Major

Anthropology as a Discipline

In the past, anthropology concentrated on documenting so-called “primitive” culture. Today it is better characterized as the study of contemporary social life from more complex industrial societies to technologically simpler ones, as well as those known only by way of the archaeological record. An emerging interest in anthropology is the transnational character of most human lives.

The discipline traditionally included four subfields:

  1. Social anthropology, which is concerned with institutionalized patterns of social life (e.g., economics, kinship, gender, politics, race, religion).
  2. Physical anthropology, which studies human beings as biological organisms, focusing on human genetics, race, and evolution.
  3. Archaeology, which investigates societies of the past by excavating and analyzing their material remains.
  4. Linguistics, which studies languages as systems of communication.

Anthropology majors at Bates are exposed to all subfields, though the emphasis is on social anthropology.

Some anthropology courses have a geographical focus and others a methodological or theoretical one. Besides our shared contemporary North Atlantic culture, the department emphasizes Southern Asia, Sub-Saharan Africa, the Caribbean, and the Mediterranean, as well as the prehistoric and early historic cultures of northeastern North America. The Bates Anthropology faculty include:

Bruce Bourque (Ph.D., Harvard), Senior Lecturer in Anthropology. Professor Bourque is senior archaeologist at the Maine State Museum. In addition to museum work, his research interests include cultural evolution and ecology and ethnohistory. His archaeological fieldwork has been in New England.

Patricia Buck (Ph.D., U Penn), Assistant Professor of Education. Professor Buck is trained in ethnographic methods and teaches and advises our students, although she is appointed full-time in the Education Department.

Val Carnegie (Ph.D., Johns Hopkins), Professor of Anthropology. Professor Carnegie’s interests include transnationalism, ethnicity, race, and economic development with a focus on the Caribbean.

Loring Danforth (Ph.D., Princeton), Professor of Anthropology. Professor Danforth’s research interests include folklore, psychological anthropology, and the study of ethnicity and nationalism. His fieldwork has been in Greece and Australia where he has studied Macedonian immigrants.

Elizabeth Eames (Ph.D., Harvard), Associate Professor of Anthropology. Professor Eames’ geographical area of specialization is Africa. Her interests include gender issues, economic anthropology, colonialism, and film.

Steven Kemper (Ph.D., Chicago), Professor of Anthropology. Professor Kemper is a South Asianist with special interests in the religions and politics of that region. His primary fieldwork has been in Sri Lanka where he researches consumption and citizenship.

Heather Lindkvist (ABD, Chicago), Visiting Instructor. Professor Lindkvist is completing her Ph.D. research in Lewiston – an ethnographic study of Somali Muslims in the diaspora. She teaches medical anthropology, the anthropology of sexuality, Islamic studies, and methodology courses in the Bates Anthropology Department.