Courses

Courses

BIOC 360. Independent Study.

Students, in consultation with a faculty advisor, individually design and plan a course of study or research not offered in the curriculum. Course work includes a reflective component, evaluation, and completion of an agreed-upon product. Sponsorship by a faculty member in the program/department, a course prospectus, and permission of the chair are required. Students may register for no more than one independent study per semester. Normally offered every year. Staff.
Interdisciplinary Programs

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

BIOC 457. Senior Thesis.

A laboratory or library research study in an area of interest under the supervision of a member of the biology or chemistry department. Senior majors deliver presentations on their research. Students register for BIOC 457 in the fall semester and BIOC 458 in the winter semester. Majors writing an honors thesis register for both BIOC 457 and 458. [W3] Normally offered every year. Staff.
Interdisciplinary Programs

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

BIOC 458. Senior Thesis.

A laboratory or library research study in an area of interest under the supervision of a member of the biology or chemistry department. Senior majors will be asked to deliver presentations on their research. Students register for Biological Chemistry 457 in the fall semester and Biological Chemistry 458 in the winter semester. Majors writing an honors thesis register for both Biological Chemistry 457 and 458. [W3] Normally offered every year. Staff.
Interdisciplinary Programs

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

Short Term Courses

BC/SP s23. Intersection of Biomedicine and Human Rights: The Case of the Chilean Mining Experience.

This course explores the intersections between natural scientific inquiry and social and cultural studies. Through historical, scientific, cultural, and bioethical lenses, students examine biomedical science in Latin America and the struggle for civil, human, and health rights by workers in the Chilean mining industry since the nineteenth century. The study of historical and cultural narratives alongside the application of the scientific approach to problem solving and laboratory experimentation provide students with a foundation for further on-site examination of biomedical science in Chile, where they consider the Chilean mining industry to contextulize principles of science and health policy, the impact of scientific practices on human populations, and the intererconnectedness of state policy, public health, and human welfare. Prerequisite(s): SPAN 210. New course beginning Short Term 2016. Enrollment limited to 17. Instructor permission is required. [S] [Q] One-time offering. T. Lawson, C. Aburto Guzmán.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

BIOC s50. Independent Study.

Students, in consultation with a faculty advisor, individually design and plan a course of study or research not offered in the curriculum. Course work includes a reflective component, evaluation, and completion of an agreed-upon product. Sponsorship by a faculty member in the program/department, a course prospectus, and permission of the chair are required. Students may register for no more than one independent study during a Short Term. Normally offered every year. Staff.
Interdisciplinary Programs

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)