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Research

Arctic ice flows.

Professor Ambrose’s research interests include understanding the  biological and physical processes structuring marine seafloor communities and how these processes may change in response to changes in  climate, using the environmental record stored in the hard parts of marine organisms to reconstruct Holocene climate history, and managing invertebrate fisheries

Research Grants 

(Last ten years)
2012-2014  Maine Sea Grant Program: “Spatial and Temporal Variation in the Growth of the Soft-Shell Clam (Mya arenaria) Along the Coast of Maine” (P.I. $147,473).

2011-2012  Norwegian Department of Environmental Protection: “Pilot Study of Contaminants in Freshwater Mussels in Northern Norway” (Co. P.I. $50,000).

2011-2012  Norwegian Department of Environmental Protection: “Ecosystem Structure and Use of Marine Resources from Bivalve and Fish Bone Proxies” (Co. P.I. $68,000). 

2011-2012  Norwegian Department of Environmental Protection:  “Developing an Exhibition at Polaria on Bivalve Behavior and Growth to Inform the Public about the Effects of Climate Change and Pollution in the Arctic”  (Co. P.I. $37,000).

2011-2012  The Research Council of Norway: “Remote Online Biosensors:  Detection of Climate Change and Industrial Impact on Bivalve Behavior”  (Co. P.I. $500,000).

2011-2012  Statoil, Shell Oil Company, and ENI “Effects of Dispersed Oil on Shallow Water Barents Sea Species”  (Co. P.I. $416,000).

2010-2013  National Science Foundation: “Shetland Islands Climate and Settlement Project: Multidisciplinary Analysis of Environmental Catastrophes on Northern Coastlines” ARC-1026911(Co. P.I. $257,324).

2009-2013  National Science Foundation: “Changes in baseline conditions in Gulf of Maine coastal ecosystems over the Last 4000 years” OCE-0929900 (Co. P.I. $392,803).

2008-2009  Maine Department of Marine Resources Growth and long-term abundance patterns of the bloodworm (Glycera dibranchiata). (P.I. $7000).

2008-2009  Maine Sea Grant Program: Growth and long-term abundance patterns of the bloodworm (Glycera dibranchiata) (P.I. $49,000).

2007-2010  The Research Council of Norway: “Diet and Reproductive Output in Arctic Mollusks: The importance of ice algae and phytoplankton” (Co. P.I, $135,000).

2006-2007  Maine Department of Marine Resources: “Harvest Size, growth, and harvest efficiency of Glycera dibranchiata/from intertidal mud flats in mid-coast Maine” (P.I. $2,500).

2006-2008  Maine Department of Marine Resources: “Frequency, intensity, and ecological consequences of blood worm (Glycera dibranchiata) harvesting on intertidal mudflats in Maine” (P.I. $12,722).

2006-2008  Maine Sea Grant Program: “Frequency, intensity, and ecological consequences of blood worm (Glycera dibranchiata) harvesting on intertidal mudflats in Maine” (P.I. $134,204).

2004  Maine Sea Grant Program: “Preliminary investigation of sediment disturbance from blood worm digging” (P.I. $3000).

2003  The Research Council of Norway: “Environmental effects of offshore oil activities in the Norwegian Arctic: Experimental tests of petroleum-associated components on benthos at community, individual, and cellular levels” (Co. P.I. $452,121).

2002  The Research Council of Norway: “Carbon flux and ecosystem feedback in the northern Barents Sea in an era of climate change (CABANERA)” (Foreign investigator, $900,000).

2002  The Research Council of Norway “Life at the edge:  Benthic communities at the Barents Sea ice edge in a changing climate (BASICC)” (Foreign investigator, $150,000).

2002  National Science Foundation: “Digestibility of ice algae and phytoplankton: The potential impacts of changing food supply to the arctic benthos” OPP-0222423 (Co. P.I. $124,000).

2002  National Science Foundation: Cultural Anthropology, Arctic Social Sciences, Arctic Natural Sciences Programs: “Investigating ecological change in the near-shore Kotzebue Sound Ecosystem: Simultaneous application of traditional and scientific knowledge” OPP-0138596 (Co. P.I. $795,000).

 


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