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Neuroscience

Professor Kelsey (Psychology; chair); Associate Professors Kleckner (Biology) and Sargent (Psychology); Assistant Professor Koven (Psychology)

Neuroscience examines the bidirectional interrelations between the nervous system and behavior. Neuroscience takes an interdisciplinary approach that includes perspectives from biology, psychology, chemistry, and philosophy. Neuroscience majors become familiar with neurobiology, physiological psychology, and cognitive neuroscience through classroom and laboratory experiences that include a thesis. More information on the neuroscience program is available on the Web site (www.bates.edu/NRSC.xml).

Major Requirements. The fifteen courses required to major in neuroscience include four core neuroscience courses (Neuroscience/Psychology 200, 330, 363 and Biology/Neuroscience 308), which should be completed by the end of the junior year. In addition, three upper-level courses from the two elective lists below are required. All three courses may come from list A, consisting of neuroscience-related courses. Alternatively, one course from list B, consisting of background courses, may be substituted for a course from list A. Also required are Biology 101 and 242; Psychology 218; Chemistry 107A or Chemistry/Environmental Studies 107B; Chemistry 108A or Chemistry/Environmental Studies 108B; Chemistry 217 and 218. Some of these courses have prerequisites.

Required Senior Thesis. At least a one-semester thesis, typically supervised by the neuroscience faculty, is required of all neuroscience majors (Neuroscience 457 and/or 458). Given the difficulty of generating sufficient data in one semester, a two-semester thesis is the norm and is highly recommended, especially for those who intend to go on to graduate school. Preliminary thesis proposals are due during the second semester of the junior year. Seniors are also required to present their thesis in the form of a poster or oral presentation at the end of the winter semester.

Pass/Fail Grading Option. Pass/fail grading may not be elected for courses applied toward the major.

Courses
NS/PY 200. Introduction to Neuroscience.In this course, students learn how the structure and function of the central and peripheral nervous systems support mind and behavior. Topics introduced include neuroanatomy, developmental neurobiology, neurophysiology, neuropharmacology, and neuropsychiatry. The course is aimed at prospective majors and nonmajors interested in exploring a field in which biology and psychology merge, and to which many other disciplines (e.g., chemistry, philosophy, anthropology, linguistics, computer science) have contributed. Prerequisite(s): Psychology 101 or any 100-level biology course. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 50. Normally offered every year. N. Koven.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

BI/NS 308. Neurobiology.The course is an introduction to the molecular and cellular principles of neurobiology and the organization of neurons into networks. Also included are the topics of developmental and synaptic plasticity, and the role invertebrate systems have played in our understanding of these processes. Laboratories include electrical recordings from nerve cells, computer simulation and modeling, and the use of molecular techniques in neurobiology. Prerequisite(s): Biology 242 or s42. Enrollment limited to 12 per section. [S] [L] [Q] Normally offered every year. N. Kleckner.
Concentrations
NS/PY 330. Cognitive Neuroscience.This course explores how the neurological organization of the brain influences the way people think, feel, and act. Particular emphasis is given to the brain systems that support motor control, object recognition, spatial processing, attention, language, memory, executive functions, and emotion. Students also investigate clinical syndromes and unusual cognitive phenomena. A wide range of research techniques is introduced, including positron emission topography, functional magnetic resonance imaging, neuropsychological assessment, startle blink response, event-related potentials, magnetoencephalography, and transcranial magnetic stimulation. Prerequisite(s): Neuroscience/Psychology 200 or 363 or Psychology 230. Normally offered every year. N. Koven.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

NRSC 360. Independent Study.Students, in consultation with a faculty advisor, individually design and plan a course of study or research not offered in the curriculum. Course work includes a reflective component, evaluation, and completion of an agreed-upon product. Sponsorship by a faculty member in the program/department, a course prospectus, and permission of the chair are required. Students may register for no more than one independent study per semester. Normally offered every semester. Staff.
NS/PY 363. Physiological Psychology.The course is an introduction to the concepts and methods used in the study of physiological mechanisms underlying behavior. Topics include an introduction to neurophysiology and neuroanatomy; an examination of sensory and motor mechanisms; and the physiological bases of ingestion, sexual behavior, reinforcement, learning, memory, and abnormal behavior. Laboratory work includes examination of neuroanatomy, development of neurosurgical and histological skills, and behavioral testing of rodents. Prerequisite(s): Neuroscience/Psychology 200 or Biology/Neuroscience 308. [L] Normally offered every year. J. Kelsey.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

NRSC 457. Senior Thesis.Independent laboratory research in neuroscience under the supervision of a faculty member. Students register for Neuroscience 457 in the fall semester and/or for Neuroscience 458 in the winter semester. Majors writing an honors thesis register for both Neuroscience 457 and 458. [W3] Normally offered every year. Staff.
NRSC 457, 458. Senior Thesis.Independent laboratory research in neuroscience under the supervision of a faculty member. Students register for Neuroscience 457 in the fall semester and/or for Neuroscience 458 in the winter semester. Majors writing an honors thesis register for both Neuroscience 457 and 458. [W3] Normally offered every year. Staff.
NRSC 458. Senior Thesis in Neuroscience.Independent laboratory research in neuroscience under the supervision of a faculty member. Students register for Neuroscience 457 in the fall semester and/or for Neuroscience 458 in the winter semester. Majors writing an honors thesis register for both Neuroscience 457 and 458. [W3] Normally offered every year. Staff.
Short Term Courses
NRSC s50. Independent Study.Students, in consultation with a faculty advisor, individually design and plan a course of study or research not offered in the curriculum. Course work includes a reflective component, evaluation, and completion of an agreed-upon product. Sponsorship by a faculty member in the program/department, a course prospectus, and permission of the chair is required. Students may register for no more than one independent study during a Short Term. Open to first-year students. Normally offered every year. Staff.



Required Courses
NS/PY 200. Introduction to Neuroscience.
NS/BI 308. Neurobiology.
NS/PY 330. Cognitive Neuroscience.
NS/PY 363. Physiological Psychology.
NRSC 457 or 458. Senior Thesis.

BIO 101. Organismal Biology.
BIO 242. Cellular and Molecular Biology.

CHEM 107A. Atomic and Molecular Structure or CH/ES 107B. Chemical Structure and Its Importance in the Environment.
CHEM 108A. Chemical Reactivity or CH/ES 108B. Chemical Reactivity in Environmental Systems.
CHEM 217. Organic Chemistry I.
CHEM 218. Organic Chemistry II.

PSYC 218. Statistics and Experimental Design.

Elective Courses
Majors must take three courses from these two lists, either all three from list A or two from list A and one from list B. Students are encouraged to take these courses from different faculty members. A student may count only one of Biology 320, Biology 338, or Psychology 362 toward the major. Students may count only Biology 476 or s44, Psychology 305 or s19, and Psychology 401 or s41 toward the major. Only one Short Term unit can count toward the major.

List A: Courses Related to Neuroscience.

BIO 331. Molecular Biology.
BIO 337. Animal Physiology.
BIO 338. Drug Actions on the Nervous System.
BIO 351. Immunology.

PSYC 305. Animal Learning.
PSYC 362. Psychopharmacology: How Drugs Affect Behavior.
PSYC 401. Junior-Senior Seminar in Biological Psychology.

List B: Background Courses.

BIO 320. Pharmacology.
BIO s44. Experimental Neuro/Physiology.

CHEM 321. Biological Chemistry I.

PHIL 211. Philosophy of Science.
PHIL 232. Philosophy of Psychology.
PHIL 235. Philosophy of Mind.
PHIL s26. Biomedical Ethics.

PSYC 261. Research Methodology.
PSYC 302. Sensation and Perception.
PSYC 303. Health Psychology.
PSYC 333. Advanced Topics in Abnormal Psychology.
PSYC s19. Animal Cognition: Exploring the Minds of Birds, Bee, Chimps and Dolphins.
PSYC s41. Seminar in Biological Psychology/Neuroscience.