Asian Studies

Kemper (Anthropology), Maurer-Fazio (Economics), J. Strong (Religious Studies), and Yang (Chinese); Associate Professors Boucher (Psychology), Fatone (Music), and Nguyen (Art and Visual Culture, Chair); Assistant Professors Faries (Asian Studies), Liu (Asian Studies), and Melnick (Religious Studies); Visiting Assistant Professors Sturiano (Japanese) and Weetman (Japanese); Lecturer Konoeda (Japanese) and Miao (Chinese)



In the early years of the twenty-first century, Asia has gained enormous visibility across the globe. Knowledge of Asian languages gives access to enduring, complex, and constantly developing societies to which the rest of the world has repeatedly turned for insight. An understanding of Asian cultures complements language study, concentrating on ways Asians live their lives and interact with the larger world. Asian studies is an interdisciplinary program designed to acquaint students with the economies, histories, politics, arts, languages, literatures, and religions of Asian societies.

Planning for the Major or Minor. The program offers three majors, Chinese, Japanese, and East Asian studies. The major requirements and courses are listed below. Each of these majors gives students an opportunity to develop an understanding of East Asia by intensive study of Chinese or Japanese and to pursue topical courses introducing some of the most accomplished civilizations and dynamic societies in today's world. In addition to the majors, the Program in Asian Studies offers minors in Chinese, Japanese, and Asian studies. More information on the Program in Asian Studies is available on the website (bates.edu/asian/).

Chinese

The Chinese major is built around a structured sequence of instruction in language skills leading to competency in spoken and written Mandarin, with classical Chinese taught at the advanced level. Emphasis is placed on familiarizing students with the rich cultural heritage of China's 4,000-year history, which is transmitted and embodied by the native language of more than one billion people. The program strongly recommends that majors spend their junior year on a departmentally recognized study-abroad program in mainland China or Taiwan.

Major Requirements. The major consists of a minimum of twelve courses that must include:

1) Language:
a) CHI 101–102. Beginning Chinese I and II.
CHI 201–202. Intermediate Chinese I and II.
CHI 301–302. Upper-Level Modern Chinese I and II.
Students with previous experience in Chinese who begin their study of Chinese at the second-year level may elect to fulfill this requirement with CHI 201–202, 301–302, 401–402 or the equivalent.

b) One course at the 400-level from among the following:
CHI 401. Advanced Chinese I.
CHI 402. Advanced Chinese II.
CHI 415. Readings in Classical Chinese.
CHI s42. Readings in Modern Chinese Culture.
CHI 401 and/or 402 may be used in fulfillment of either this requirement or (a) above but not both.

2) Literature and Culture:
a) AS/CI 207. Traditional Chinese Literature in Translation.

b) Two courses from among the following:
AS/CI 223. Modern and Contemporary Chinese Literature in Translation.
AS/CI 225. Art and Politics in China.
AS/CI 312. Kungfu Cinemas: Asia and Beyond.
INDS s10. Between Past and Future: Contemporary Chinese Art since 1980.
Any first-year seminar on China.
CHI 415, 421, or s42 may also be used to fulfill part of this requirement if not being used toward fulfillment of requirement (1b) above.

Students may also apply, at most, one of the following courses toward the fulfillment of this requirement:
AS/HI 171. China and Its Culture.
AS/AV 234. Chinese Arts and Visual Culture.
AS/HI 274. China in Revolution.
AS/RE 208. Religions in China.

3) Thesis Sequence:
a) ASIA 320. Individual and Society in East Asia.

b) CHI 457 or CHI 458. Senior Thesis. Students are expected to utilize some source materials in Chinese in conducting research for the thesis. Qualified students may elect to write the thesis in Chinese.

Courses Taken Abroad. Students may petition the program to have courses taken in their study-abroad program applied toward the fulfillment of requirements (1a) and (2b) above.

Pass/Fail Grading Option. Pass/fail grading may not be elected for courses applied toward the Chinese major.

Advanced Placement. Students may receive credit for CHI 102 with a score of four on the Chinese Advanced Placement examination, or credit for CHI 201 with a score of five.

Minor. A minor requires seven courses, six of which must be in Chinese. At least one of the seven courses must involve the study of literature or culture. A student may petition to have up to three comparable courses, completed at other institutions in the United States or abroad, apply toward the minor.

Pass/Fail Grading Option. Pass/fail grading may not be elected for courses applied toward the minor in Chinese.



Courses

CHI 101. Beginning Chinese I.

An introduction to spoken and written modern Chinese. Conversation and comprehension exercises in the classroom and laboratory provide practice in pronunciation and the use of basic patterns of speech. Enrollment limited to 20. Normally offered every year. L. Miao, S. Yang.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

CHI 102. Beginning Chinese II.

A continuation of CHI 101 with increasing emphasis on the recognition of Chinese characters. By the conclusion of this course, students know more than one quarter of the characters expected of an educated Chinese person. Classes, conducted increasingly in Chinese, stress sentence patterns that facilitate both speaking and reading. Prerequisite(s): CHI 101. Normally offered every year. L. Miao, S. Yang.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

CHI 201. Intermediate Chinese I.

Designed to enable students to converse in everyday Chinese and to read simple texts in Chinese. Classes conducted primarily in Chinese aim at further development of overall language proficiency. Prerequisite(s): CHI 102. Open to first-year students. Normally offered every year. L. Miao, Staff.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

CHI 202. Intermediate Chinese II.

A continuation of CHI 201. Prerequisite(s): CHI 201 Open to first-year students. Normally offered every year. L. Miao, Staff.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

AS/CI 207. Traditional Chinese Literature in Translation.

An exploration of Chinese literature through reading and discussion of some of its masterworks of poetry, drama, fiction, and belles-lettres prose from ancient times through the premodern era. Not open to students who have received credit for CHI 207. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 25. [W2] Normally offered every year. S. Yang.
Concentrations

AS/CI 223. Modern and Contemporary Chinese Literature in Translation.

A survey of Chinese literature since 1911, including a wide range of fiction, poetry, and drama from mainland China and texts from the Chinese diaspora as well. Students gain a greater understanding of China's history and literary culture in three major periods: the May Fourth shift from traditional language and forms to vernacular literature; Socialist Realism and the Marxist theory of the first three decades of the People's Republic; and China's Reform Era, including expatriate authors like Ha Jin and China's two controversial Nobel Prize winners, Gao Xingjian and Moyan. Recommended background: AS/CI 207. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 40. [W2] Normally offered every year. N. Faries.
Concentrations

AS/CI 225. Art and Politics in China.

Women in Chinese art? Women making Chinese art? Chinese art about women? For women's consumption? How is art history written in gendered terms? This course examines gender politics in modern Chinese art, and rethinks the representation of women, art created by women, and as artists' ruminations on gender. Students investigate how "women" are visualized, and how images related to the feminine subject were mobilized for various social and political purposes. They consider the construction of ideal womanhood, feminine space, women as producers of art, women and religion, and women as political agents. Media include painting, sculpture, prints, textile art, photography, performance, and video art. Enrollment limited to 40. Normally offered every year. Y. Liu.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

CHI 301. Upper-Level Modern Chinese I.

Designed for students who already have a strong background in spoken Chinese, the course gives an intensive review of the essentials of grammar and phonology, introduces a larger vocabulary and a variety of sentence patterns, improves conversational and auditory skills, and develops some proficiency in reading and writing. The course makes extensive use of short texts (both literary and nonfictional) and some films. Classes are conducted primarily in Chinese. Prerequisite(s): CHI 202. Open to first-year students. Normally offered every year. L. Miao, Staff.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

CHI 302. Upper-Level Modern Chinese II.

A continuation of CHI 301. Prerequisite(s): CHI 202. Open to first-year students. Normally offered every year. L. Miao.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

AS/CI 312. Kungfu Cinemas: Asia and Beyond.

Kungfu cinema has its icons—Bruce Lee, Jackie Chan, and Jet Li—and new Kungfu movies premiere every year. What is Kungfu cinema? What are its origins, sources, influences, different schools, and contemporary manifestations in China, Japan, India, Europe, and Hollywood? How have Kungfu films participated in fashioning national identity, body image, gender perception, and nation building in Asia and beyond? Students consider these questions by closely watching, analyzing, and interpreting a variety of Kungfu films. Enrollment limited to 15. Y. Liu.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

CHI 360. Independent Study.

Students, in consultation with a faculty advisor, individually design and plan a course of study or research not offered in the curriculum. Course work includes a reflective component, evaluation, and completion of an agreed-upon product. Sponsorship by a faculty member in the program/department, a course prospectus, and permission of the chair are required. Students may register for no more than one independent study per semester. Normally offered every semester. Staff.

CHI 365. Special Topics.

Designed for the small seminar group of students who may have particular interests in areas of study that go beyond the regular course offerings. Periodic conferences and papers are required. Instructor permission is required. Staff.

CHI 401. Advanced Chinese I.

This course is designed to further enhance students' ability to understand and speak idiomatic Mandarin Chinese. Included are readings of modern and contemporary literary works, journalistic writings, and other nonliterary texts. Classical texts may also be studied upon students' request. Prerequisite(s): CHI 302. Recommended background: three years or more of Chinese. Open to first-year students. Normally offered every year. Y. Liu.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

CHI 402. Advanced Chinese II.

A continuation of CHI 401. Prerequisite(s): CHI 302 or 401. Recommended background: three years of Chinese or more. Open to first-year students. Normally offered every year. S. Yang.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

CHI 415. Readings in Classical Chinese.

An intensive study of classical Chinese through reading selections of ancient literary, historical, and philosophical texts in the original, including excerpts from the Analects, the Mencius, Laozi, Zhuangzi, Shiji, Tang-Song prose, and poetry. Conducted in Chinese. Prerequisite(s): CHI 302 or 401. Open to first-year students. S. Yang.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

CHI 457. Senior Thesis.

An extended research project on a topic in Chinese literature, culture, or language utilizing some source materials in Chinese. Qualified students may, with approval of the Committee on Asian Studies, choose to write the thesis in Chinese. Students register for 457 in the fall semester or for 458 in the winter semester unless the committee gives approval for a two-semester project. Majors invited to pursue honors register for 457 and 458, contingent on the approval of the committee. [W3] Normally offered every year. Staff.
Interdisciplinary Programs

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

CHI 458. Senior Thesis.

An extended research project on a topic in Chinese literature, culture, or language utilizing some source materials in Chinese. Qualified students may, with approval of the Committee on Asian Studies, choose to write the thesis in Chinese. Students register for 457 in the fall semester or for 458 in the winter semester unless the committee gives approval for a two-semester project. Majors invited to pursue honors register for 457 and 458, contingent on the approval of the committee. [W3] Normally offered every year. Staff.
Interdisciplinary Programs

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

Short Term Courses

INDC s10. Between Past and Future: Contemporary Chinese Art since 1980.

A book "from the sky" with imagined characters, Mao in a Mickey Mouse costume, a nude and pregnant self-portrait, the act of repeatedly "stamping" the water with a seal in Tibet: these are snapshots of Chinese contemporary art since 1980. This course examines the exhilarating last three decades of Chinese art. While focusing on the shadow of tradition in contemporary image making, topics also include gender and sexuality, political expression and activism, private and public spaces, and questions of historiography. Cross-listed in art and visual culture, Asian studies, and Chinese. Not open to students who have received credit for AV/AS 175. Enrollment limited to 30. Y. Liu.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

CHI s42. Readings in Modern Chinese Culture.

An intensive study of modern Chinese culture through reading selections of literary and nonliterary texts in the Chinese original. Prerequisite(s): CHI 402. Not open to students who have received credit for CHI 421. Enrollment limited to 30. Staff.

CHI s50. Independent Study.

Students, in consultation with a faculty advisor, individually design and plan a course of study or research not offered in the curriculum. Course work includes a reflective component, evaluation, and completion of an agreed-upon product. Sponsorship by a faculty member in the program/department, a course prospectus, and permission of the chair are required. Students may register for no more than one independent study during a Short Term. Normally offered every year. Staff.
Japanese

The major in Japanese presents an opportunity for an in-depth and focused study of Japanese language and culture. The major places emphasis on the student's acquisition of oral and written language proficiency as well as on the development of cultural awareness and competency. The program strongly recommends that majors spend their junior year at the Associated Kyoto Program or another approved year-long study-abroad program in Japan.

Major Requirements. The major consists of a minimum of twelve courses that must include:

1) Language:
a) JPN 101–102. Beginning Japanese I and II.
JPN 201–202. Intermediate Japanese I and II.
JPN 301–302. Intermediate Japanese III and IV.

b) JPN 401. Advanced Japanese I or
JPN 402. Advanced Japanese II.

2) Literature and Culture:
a) AS/JA 125. Japanese Literature and Society.

b) Two courses from the following:
AS/HI 110. East Asia between Tradition and Modernity.
AS/JA 130. Japanese Film.
AS/JA 232. Japanese Popular Culture in the Age of Globalization.
FYS 435. The Soft Power of Pop Culture: An Introduction to Japanese Visual Cultures.
INDS 255. Female Authorship: Japanese Women Writers and Filmmakers.

Students may apply one of the following courses toward the fulfillment of this requirement:
AS/RE 209. Religions of Japan.
AV/AS 236. Japanese Art and Culture.
AV/AS 247. The Art of Zen Buddhism.

3) Thesis Sequence:
a) ASIA 320. Individual and Society in East Asia.

b) JPN 457 or 458. Senior Thesis.
Students are expected to utilize some source materials in Japanese when conducting research for the thesis. Qualified students may elect to write the thesis in Japanese.

Courses Taken Abroad. Students may petition the program to have courses taken in their study-abroad program (including the Bates Fall Semester Abroad) applied toward the fulfillment of requirements (1a) and (2b).

Pass/Fail Grading Option. Pass/fail grading may not be elected for courses applied toward the Japanese major.

Advanced Placement. Students may receive credit for JPN 102 with a score of four on the Japanese Advanced Placement examination and JPN 201 with a score of five.

Minor. A minor requires seven courses, six of which must be in Japanese. At least one of the seven courses must involve a study of literature or culture. A student may petition to have up to three comparable courses, completed at other institutions in either the United States or abroad, applied toward the minor. Advanced Placement courses may not be applied toward the minor. Majors and minors in Japanese may count no more than one course toward both the Asian Studies minor and their major.

Pass/Fail Grading Option. Pass/fail grading may not be elected for courses toward the minor in Japanese.

Courses

JPN 101. Beginning Japanese I.

An introduction to the basics of spoken and written Japanese as a foundation for advanced study and proficiency in the language. Fundamental patterns of grammar and syntax are introduced together with a practical, functional vocabulary. Mastery of the katakana and hiragana syllabaries, as well as approximately seventy written characters, introduces students to the beauty of written Japanese. Normally offered every year. J. Sturiano.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

JPN 102. Beginning Japanese II.

A continuation of JPN 101, this course is normally taken immediately following JPN 101 in order to provide a yearlong introduction to the language. Through dynamic exercises carried out inside and outside the classroom, students extend their proficiency speaking, listening, reading, and writing in Japanese. An additional seventy written characters are introduced. Prerequisite(s): JPN 101. Normally offered every year. J. Sturiano.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

AS/JA 125. Japanese Literature and Society.

This course examines major trends in Japanese literature and society from its beginnings to the modern period. Students consider well-known stories, plays, and novels from the classical, medieval, early modern, and modern periods, placing each text within its unique sociohistorical context. All readings are in English. [W2] Normally offered every year. H. Weetman.
Concentrations

AS/JA 130. Japanese Film.

This course introduces students to Japanese cinema and criticism. Students consider the aesthetic style and narrative themes of films from the silent era to the present day, focusing on directors such as Ozu Yasujiro, Kurosawa Akira, and Kitano Takeshi. Is there a distinctive Japanese film style? How do cinematic techniques such as camera movement, editing, lighting, and composition provoke emotional responses and craft narrative meaning? In addition to viewing films, students read Japanese film history and criticism. No prior familiarity with Japan is required. Conducted in English. Staff.
Concentrations

AS/JA 144. The Literature of Protest in Modern Japan.

This course traces the literary products of social and political protest movements in modern Japan. Students will become familiar with a narrative of modern Japanese literature attentive to the cultural production of authors from ethnic minority groups, women writers, and others considered "outsiders" to the Japanese literary establishment. Students will analyze how literature has served as both a means of protest and a site for recording protest in modern Japan. Readings include literary prose, poetry, and expository writing from the Meiji Period (1868-1912) through the present. Readings are in English. No prior familiarity with Japan is required. One-time offering. J. Sturiano.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

JPN 201. Intermediate Japanese I.

A continuation of JPN 102, the course stresses the acquisition of new and more complex spoken patterns, vocabulary building, and increasing knowledge of cultural context through use of calligraphy, role play, video, and varied reading materials. Approximately seventy-five new written characters are introduced. A range of oral as well as written projects and exercises provides a realistic context for language use. Prerequisite(s): JPN 102. Open to first-year students. Normally offered every year. K. Konoeda.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

JPN 202. Intermediate Japanese II.

A continuation of JPN 201, this course is normally taken immediately following JPN 201. It stresses further acquisition of complex spoken patterns, vocabulary and cultural knowledge through exercises in culturally realistic contexts. Students extend proficiency in the written language through writing projects and the introduction of approximately seventy-five new characters. Open to first-year students. Normally offered every year. K. Konoeda.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

AS/JA 232. Japanese Popular Culture in the Age of Globalization.

A survey of Japanese popular culture since the 1980s, from within and outside the geographic borders of Japan. Students examine this culture through food, popular music, and anime. How have sushi chefs defined "Japanese sushi" to satisfy consumers and sell it in foreign markets? How could we define the "cuteness" of Japanese anime characters in the gender matrices that may be specific to different cultures? What elements—either material or ideological—are transferred, transformed, or discarded when introducing popular Japanese culture to different consumer markets? This course aims to produce a critical language to envision how the ongoing process of economic globalization deconstructs conventional cultural boundaries. Not open to students who have received credit for AS/JA s23. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 40. Normally offered every year. Staff.
Concentrations

INDC 255. Modern Japanese Women Writers.

How have modern Japanese women writers portrayed the complexities of their lives and the worlds in which they lived? How do they negotiate the gendered institutions of the society in which they live? How has their work shaped what is known as "Japanese literature" within and outside of Japan? Students consider issues such as family, friendship, power, gender roles, selfhood, the female body, and aging in reading a range of novels, short stories, and poems. Supplemental readings provide background in Japanese literary history and gender theory. Selected authors include Higuchi Ichiyō, Hayashi Fumiko, Enchi Fumiko, Ohba Minako, Kurahashi Yumiko, Tawara Machi, and Kawakami Mieko. Readings and discussion are in English. No prior experience studying Japanese culture necessary. Cross-listed in Asian studies, Japanese, and women and gender studies. Open to first-year students. [W2] J. Sturiano.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

JPN 301. Intermediate Japanese III.

A continuation of JPN 202, this course and its sequel, JPN 302, complete the introduction of essential Japanese syntactic forms and sentence patterns. Students continue development of oral skills through culturally realistic exercises involving a range of topics. Emphasis is placed on increased competence in the written language. Approximately one hundred new characters are introduced. Prerequisite(s): JPN 202. Normally offered every year. H. Weetman.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

JPN 302. Intermediate Japanese IV.

A continuation of JPN 301, this course is normally taken immediately following JPN 301, and completes the introduction of essential Japanese syntactic forms and sentence patterns. Students continue development of oral skills through culturally realistic exercises involving a range of topics. Emphasis is placed on increased competence in the written language. Approximately one hundred new characters are introduced. Prerequisite(s): JPN 301. Normally offered every year. H. Weetman.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

JPN 360. Independent Study.

Students, in consultation with a faculty advisor, individually design and plan a course of study or research not offered in the curriculum. Course work includes a reflective component, evaluation, and completion of an agreed-upon product. Sponsorship by a faculty member in the program/department, a course prospectus, and permission of the chair are required. Students may register for no more than one independent study per semester. Normally offered every semester. Staff.

JPN 401. Advanced Japanese I.

Through the discussion and study of contemporary literary texts and other journalistic modes, the course seeks to utilize, develop, and integrate skills acquired in the earlier stages of language learning. Particular emphasis is placed on reading and writing, and translation. Through class presentations and discussion students further develop oral skills and expand their understanding of Japanese culture. JPN 401 may be taken before or after JPN 402. Prerequisite(s): JPN 302. Normally offered every year. K. Konoeda.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

JPN 402. Advanced Japanese II.

This course covers materials in Japanese such as newspaper articles, other media material, and short stories. Through presentations and discussions students utilize, develop, and integrate spoken skills acquired in the earlier stages of language learning. Written skills are also emphasized; normally students complete a final research project on a topic of their choice. Students taking this course in conjunction with the thesis should also register for JPN 458. JPN 402 may be taken before or after JPN 401. Prerequisite(s): JPN 302. Normally offered every year. K. Konoeda.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

JPN 457. Senior Thesis.

An extended research project on a topic in Japanese literature, culture, or language utilizing some source materials in Japanese. Qualified students may, with approval of the Committee on Asian Studies, choose to write the thesis in Japanese. Students register for 457 in the fall semester or for 458 in the winter semester unless the committee gives approval for a two-semester project. Majors invited to pursue honors register for 457 and 458, contingent on the approval of the committee. [W3] Normally offered every year. Staff.

JPN 458. Senior Thesis.

An extended research project on a topic in Japanese literature, culture, or language utilizing some source materials in Japanese. Qualified students may, with approval of the Committee on Asian Studies, choose to write the thesis in Japanese. Students register for 457 in the fall semester or for 458 in the winter semester unless the committee gives approval for a two-semester project. Majors invited to pursue honors register for 457 and 458, contingent on the approval of the committee. [W3] Normally offered every year. Staff.
Short Term Courses

AS/JA s21. Japan: A Culture of Four Seasons.

“Does your country have four seasons?" Many who travel to Japan are caught off-guard by this seemingly simple and oft-asked question. The impetus behind the inquiry, however, is not nearly as superficial or mundane as it might seem. In this course students explore Japanese expressions of kisetsukan—a "sensitivity to the seasons”—to understand how an ideological sensitivity to nature and temporality have shaped dominant cultural practices from poetry, literature, and visual media to food, fashion, and festivals. Readings, screenings, tastings, and hands-on creative projects are designed to cultivate an embodied experience for all participants. Enrollment limited to 30. Staff.

AS/JA s24. Transfiguring Desire in Japanese Culture: The Legend of Ono no Komachi from Noh Drama to Anime.

How did a ninth-century Japanese female poet end up with her name on a bag of rice? Only a handful of Ono no Komachi’s poems survive, yet her name is a cultural byword in Japan that conjures up an ideal of classical beauty as well as images both of a sensuous lover and an abandoned old hag. This course traces the evolving figure of Komachi in Japanese culture, considering matters of gender, taste, patronage, and politics. Coursework encourages creative engagement with theater, literature, art, and pop culture. Conducted in English; readings are in English and no prior familiarity with Japanese culture is required. New course beginning Short Term 2017. Enrollment limited to 30. One-time offering. H. Weetman.

JPN s50. Independent Study.

Students, in consultation with a faculty advisor, individually design and plan a course of study or research not offered in the curriculum. Course work includes a reflective component, evaluation, and completion of an agreed-upon product. Sponsorship by a faculty member in the program/department, a course prospectus, and permission of the chair are required. Students may register for no more than one independent study during a Short Term. Normally offered every year. Staff.
Interdisciplinary Programs

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

East Asian Studies

The East Asian studies major provides students with a broad introduction to the cultures and societies of East Asia and their interrelationships. The major includes, first, a core curriculum that consists of two years of Chinese or Japanese language study as well as two courses introducing the East Asian experience, and, second, a major concentration that focuses either on traditional or modern society and culture. East Asian studies majors are also encouraged to spend at least one semester at an approved program in mainland China, Taiwan, or Japan. Majors in Chinese or Japanese may count no more than two courses toward both their major in East Asian Studies and their major in Chinese or Japanese.

Major Requirements. Students majoring in East Asian studies must complete the core requirement, a major concentration, and the thesis sequence. Students must take at least one course dealing primarily with China and one dealing primarily with Japan.

The following core courses are required of all majors:
1) Either
Four courses of Chinese language and
AS/HI 171. China and Its Culture.
or
Four courses of Japanese language and one of the following:
AS/JA 125. Japanese Literature and Society.
AS/RE 209. Religions of Japan.
AV/AS 236. Japanese Art and Culture.

2) AS/HI 110. East Asia between Tradition and Modernity.

3) Each major elects a major concentration, either East Asian Cultural Traditions or Modern East Asian Society and Culture.

a) East Asian Cultural Traditions: Three courses on traditional East Asian culture from at least two of the following four groups:
I) Literature:
AS/JA 125. Japanese Literature and Society.
AS/CI 207. Traditional Chinese Literature in Translation.
CHI 415. Readings in Classical Chinese.
FYS 386. Chinese Traditions, Great and Small.

II) Visual and performing art:
AVC 229. Modern Vietnamese Culture through Film.
AS/JA 130. Japanese Film.
AS/CI 225. Art and Politics in China.
AS/CI 312. Kungfu Cinemas: Asia and Beyond.
AV/AS 234. Chinese Visual Culture.
AV/AS 236. Japanese Art and Culture.
AV/AS 243. Buddhist Visual Worlds.
AV/AS 246. Visual Narratives: Storytelling in East Asian Art.
AV/AS 247. The Art of Zen Buddhism.
CI/TH 230. Drama and Theater of China.
FYS 435. The Soft Power of Pop Culture: An Introduction to Japanese Visual Cultures.
INDS s10. Between Past and Future: Contemporary Chinese Art since 1980.


III) Religion:
AS/RE 208. Religions in China.
AS/RE 209. Religions in Japan.
AS/RE 251. Religions of Tibet.
AS/RE 309. Buddhism in East Asia.

IV) History:
AS/HI 171. China and Its Culture (if not taken as a core course).
AS/HI 172. Japanese History: From Jōmon to J-Pop. (if not taken as a core course).

b) Modern East Asian Society and Culture: Three courses from the following list:
AS/JA 130. Japanese Film.
AS/CI 223. Modern and Contemporary Chinese Literature in Translation.
AS/CI 225. Art and Politics in China.
AS/EC 231. The Economic Development of Japan.
AS/JA 232. Japanese Popular Culture in the Age of Globalization.
AS/EC 241. China's Economic Reforms.
AS/EC 242. Work and Workers in China.
AS/PY 260. Cultural Psychology.
AS/HI 274. China in Revolution.
AS/CI 312. Kungfu Cinemas: Asia and Beyond.
FYS 435. The Soft Power of Pop Culture: An Introduction to Japanese Visual Cultures.
FYS 439. Defining Difference: How China and the US Think about Racial Diversity.
INDS 255. Female Authorship: Japanese Women Writers and Filmmakers.
INDS s10. Between Past and Future: Contemporary Chinese Art since 1980.

4) One additional course from the general lists of courses in Asian Studies, Chinese, or Japanese (i.e., any course with the designation ASIA, AS, CHI, CI, JA, JPN), with the exception of those courses that focus on South or Southeast Asia (AV/AS 245, AS/RE 249, 250 AS/MU 252, AS/RE 308).

5) Thesis Sequence:
a) Asia 320. Individual and Society in East Asia.
b) Senior Thesis (ASIA 457 or 458).

Pass/Fail Grading Option. Pass/fail grading may not be elected for courses applied toward the major in East Asian studies.

Courses Taken Abroad. Students may petition the Asian studies program to have relevant courses taken in their study-abroad program (including the Bates Fall Semester Abroad) applied toward the fulfillment of the major requirements except for ASIA 110 and the thesis sequence.

Advanced Placement. Students may receive credit for CHI 102 or JPN 102 with a score of 4 on the corresponding language's AP examination, or credit for CHI 201 or JPN 201 with a score of 5.

Minor in Asian Studies. Students may fulfill a minor in Asian studies by completing six courses from the list of courses in Asian studies, Chinese, and Japanese. In consultation with an Asian studies faculty member (chosen or appointed by the Asian studies chair) and in accordance with program guidelines, students may design their own course of study. Among the six courses, at least four should be related as a coherent group. Examples include a group of courses related to Buddhist studies, South Asia, gender issues, environmental concerns, a specific historical period, or the socioeconomic or political situation of a particular region.

The minor may include one Short Term course and a maximum of four language courses. No more than two of those language courses may be counted toward the coherent group. With the approval of the minor advisor, students may apply up to two courses taken on study-abroad programs toward the minor, as well as courses taken on Bates Fall Semester Abroad programs in Asia. Majors in Chinese, Japanese, or East Asian studies and minors in Chinese or Japanese may count no more than one course toward both the Asian studies minor and their major or minor.

Additional Courses for the Minor. All courses designated ASIA, AS, CI, CHI, JA, or JPN may be taken to fulfill the minor in Asian studies. In addition, the following courses may be taken to fulfill the minor in Asian studies:

ANTH 240. Person and Society in South Asia.
ANTH 263. Buddhism and the Social Order.
ANTH 264. India and Its World: Bhangra, Bollywood, and Buddhism.

AV/RE 244. Visual Narratives in South and Southeast Asia.
AVC 248. The Art of Rock-Cut Architecture in Asia.

EN/WS 121G. Asian American Women Writers.
ENG 260. Passages to and from India.
EN/WS 395s. Asian American Women Writers, Filmmakers, and Critics.

FYS 435. The Soft Power of Pop Culture: An Introduction to Japanese Visual Cultures.
FYS 439. Defining Difference: How China and the United States Think about Racial Diversity.

MUS s25. Performing Musical Art of Indonesia.

Pass/Fail Grading Option. Pall/fail grading may not be elected for courses applied toward the minor in Asian Studies.

Courses

AS/HI 110. East Asia between Tradition and Modernity.

China, Japan, and Korea each had a watershed moment in which they transformed into modern, independent nations. This course first provides an introduction to traditional cultures, and then explores the violent changes that swept over East Asia from the mid-nineteenth century through the Chinese Civil War and the destruction of World War II. Imperialism, women's liberation, and cultural nationalism are examined through an interdisciplinary approach that draws from intellectual history, literature, and visual and performing arts. Not open to students who have received credit for ASIA 110. Enrollment limited to 50. (East Asian.) (Modern. ) Normally offered every year. N. Faries.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

AS/JA 125. Japanese Literature and Society.

This course examines major trends in Japanese literature and society from its beginnings to the modern period. Students consider well-known stories, plays, and novels from the classical, medieval, early modern, and modern periods, placing each text within its unique sociohistorical context. All readings are in English. [W2] Normally offered every year. H. Weetman.
Concentrations

AS/JA 130. Japanese Film.

This course introduces students to Japanese cinema and criticism. Students consider the aesthetic style and narrative themes of films from the silent era to the present day, focusing on directors such as Ozu Yasujiro, Kurosawa Akira, and Kitano Takeshi. Is there a distinctive Japanese film style? How do cinematic techniques such as camera movement, editing, lighting, and composition provoke emotional responses and craft narrative meaning? In addition to viewing films, students read Japanese film history and criticism. No prior familiarity with Japan is required. Conducted in English. Staff.
Concentrations

AS/JA 144. The Literature of Protest in Modern Japan.

This course traces the literary products of social and political protest movements in modern Japan. Students will become familiar with a narrative of modern Japanese literature attentive to the cultural production of authors from ethnic minority groups, women writers, and others considered "outsiders" to the Japanese literary establishment. Students will analyze how literature has served as both a means of protest and a site for recording protest in modern Japan. Readings include literary prose, poetry, and expository writing from the Meiji Period (1868-1912) through the present. Readings are in English. No prior familiarity with Japan is required. One-time offering. J. Sturiano.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

AS/RE 155. Introduction to Asian Religions.

An introduction to the major religious traditions of Asia, in both their classical and modern forms, with a focus on the lifestories of individual figures in the Hindu, Buddhist, Tibetan, Chinese, and Japanese traditions. The course explores their basic teachings, examines their historical and social contexts, and seeks answers to questions such as: What is the nature of religious experience? What are the functions of myth and ritual? How do Asian world views differ from each other and from Western ones? Enrollment limited to 40. A. Melnick.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

AS/HI 171. China and Its Culture.

An overview of Chinese civilization from the god-kings of the second millennium and the emergence of the Confucian familial state in the first millennium B.C.E., through the expansion of the hybrid Sino-foreign empires, to the revolutionary transformation of Chinese society by internal and external pressures in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Enrollment limited to 48. (East Asian.) (Premodern.) (Early Modern.) (Modern. ) Normally offered every year. W. Chaney.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

AV/AS 175. Between Past and Future: Contemporary Chinese Art since 1980.

A book "from the sky" with imagined characters, Mao in a Mickey Mouse costume, a nude and pregnant self-portrait, the act of repeatedly "stamping" the water with a seal in Tibet: these are snapshots of Chinese contemporary art since 1980. This course examines the exhilarating last three decades of Chinese art. While focusing on the shadow of tradition in contemporary image making, topics also include gender and sexuality, political expression and activism, private and public spaces, and questions of historiography. New course beginning Winter 2017. Not open to students who have received credit for INDS s10. Enrollment limited to 40. Y. Liu.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

AS/CI 207. Traditional Chinese Literature in Translation.

An exploration of Chinese literature through reading and discussion of some of its masterworks of poetry, drama, fiction, and belles-lettres prose from ancient times through the premodern era. Not open to students who have received credit for CHI 207. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 25. [W2] Normally offered every year. S. Yang.
Concentrations

AS/RE 208. Religions in China.

A study of the various religious traditions of China in their independence and interaction. The course focuses on the history, doctrines, and practices of Daoism, Confucianism, and various schools of Mahayana Buddhism. Readings include basic texts and secondary sources. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 40. N. Faries.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

AS/RE 209. Religions in Japan.

A study of the various religious traditions of Japan in their independence and interaction. The course focuses on the doctrines and practices of Shinto, folk religion, and various schools of Buddhism. These are considered in the context of Japanese history and culture and set against their Korean and Chinese backgrounds. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 40. A. Melnick.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

AS/CI 223. Modern and Contemporary Chinese Literature in Translation.

A survey of Chinese literature since 1911, including a wide range of fiction, poetry, and drama from mainland China and texts from the Chinese diaspora as well. Students gain a greater understanding of China's history and literary culture in three major periods: the May Fourth shift from traditional language and forms to vernacular literature; Socialist Realism and the Marxist theory of the first three decades of the People's Republic; and China's Reform Era, including expatriate authors like Ha Jin and China's two controversial Nobel Prize winners, Gao Xingjian and Moyan. Recommended background: AS/CI 207. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 40. [W2] Normally offered every year. N. Faries.
Concentrations

AS/CI 225. Art and Politics in China.

Women in Chinese art? Women making Chinese art? Chinese art about women? For women's consumption? How is art history written in gendered terms? This course examines gender politics in modern Chinese art, and rethinks the representation of women, art created by women, and as artists' ruminations on gender. Students investigate how "women" are visualized, and how images related to the feminine subject were mobilized for various social and political purposes. They consider the construction of ideal womanhood, feminine space, women as producers of art, women and religion, and women as political agents. Media include painting, sculpture, prints, textile art, photography, performance, and video art. Enrollment limited to 40. Normally offered every year. Y. Liu.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

AS/EC 231. The Economic Development of Japan.

This course surveys the development of Japan's economy. A brief historical introduction focuses on the preconditions for economic modernization and the role of the government in Japan's late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century experience. The course then concentrates on an overview of Japan's post–World War II experience of recovery, explosive growth, slowdown, and attempted reform. Students consider whether the Japanese economy operates according to principles, objectives, and structures that are substantially different from those of the West. Japan's economic impact on other East Asian countries and relatedness with the world economy are also explored. Prerequisite(s): ECON 101 or 103. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 30. [W2] M. Maurer-Fazio.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

AS/JA 232. Japanese Popular Culture in the Age of Globalization.

A survey of Japanese popular culture since the 1980s, from within and outside the geographic borders of Japan. Students examine this culture through food, popular music, and anime. How have sushi chefs defined "Japanese sushi" to satisfy consumers and sell it in foreign markets? How could we define the "cuteness" of Japanese anime characters in the gender matrices that may be specific to different cultures? What elements—either material or ideological—are transferred, transformed, or discarded when introducing popular Japanese culture to different consumer markets? This course aims to produce a critical language to envision how the ongoing process of economic globalization deconstructs conventional cultural boundaries. Not open to students who have received credit for AS/JA s23. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 40. Normally offered every year. Staff.
Concentrations

AV/AS 234. Chinese Arts and Visual Culture.

This course introduces Chinese visual cultures, from the Neolithic period to the present day, focusing on a period of particular cultural significance from the Han to Qing dynasties. The course reveals interrelationships among Chinese art, literature, religious philosophy, and politics. Topics discussed include artists' places within specific social groups, theories of arts, questions of patronage, and the relation of traditional indigenous art forms to the evolving social and cultural orders from which they draw life. Principal objects include ritual objects, bronze vessels, ceramics, porcelain, lacquer ware, sculptures, rock-cut temples, gardens, painting, calligraphy, and wood-block prints. Recommended background: AS/HI 171, AS/RE 208, and CHI 261. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 45. (Non-Western Canon.) T. Nguyen.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

AV/AS 236. Japanese Arts and Visual Culture.

This course surveys the history of Japanese art and visual culture focusing on the development of pictorial, sculptural, and architectural traditions from the Neolithic to the present time. The course explores the relationship between indigenous art forms and the foreign concepts, art forms and techniques that influenced Japanese culture, and social political and religious contexts as well as the role of patronage for artistic production. Topics include architecture, sculpture, painting, narrative handscrolls, the Zen arts, monochromatic ink painting, woodblock prints, decorative arts, contemporary architecture, photography, and fashion design. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 30. (Non-Western Canon.) T. Nguyen.
Concentrations

AS/EC 241. China's Economic Reforms.

China's economy, now among the world's largest, has grown more rapidly than any other nation's over the last three decades. In this course, students explore the dynamism of China's recent economic transformation and the challenges it faces in the context of the enormous structural changes China has experienced in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. They address fundamental questions about the transition from socialism, the nature of market systems, and how institutions and institutional change affect economic development. Prerequisite(s): ECON 101 or 103. Enrollment limited to 25. [W2] M. Maurer-Fazio.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

AS/EC 242. Work and Workers in China.

In this course students investigate how China's economic reforms are affecting the working lives and well-being of its immense work force. Over the last three decades, China has experienced rapid structural change as tens of millions of Chinese have moved out of the agriculture sector and into the industrial and service sectors. The concomitant migration of workers from the countryside to urban areas is the largest migration in human history. Students focus on the distributional implications of China's reform experience. They consider which institutional legacies are shaping emerging labor markets, how far China has moved toward a market-determined labor system, and which segments of China's enormous population have benefited and which have been harmed by the reforms. Prerequisite(s): ECON 101 or 103. Enrollment limited to 25. [W2] M. Maurer-Fazio.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

AV/AS 243. Buddhist Arts and Visual Cultures.

The course examines the history of Buddhist visual cultures. It provides a basic introduction to a broad spectrum of Buddhist art, beginning with the emergence of early Buddhist sculpture in India and ending with modern Buddhist visual works. It examines selected works of architecture, sculpture, and paintings in their religious, social, and cultural contexts. It also briefly surveys regional Buddhism and its arts. Open to first-year students. (Non-Western Canon.) Normally offered every year. T. Nguyen.
Concentrations

AV/AS 245. Architectural Monuments of Southeast Asia.

This course examines the arts of Southeast Asia by focusing on significant monuments of the countries in the region. It examines the architecture, sculpture, and relief carvings on the ancient monuments and their relations to religious, cultural, political, and social contexts. Sites covered include Borobudur, Angkor, Pagan, Sukkhothai, and My-Son. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 40. (Non-Western Canon.) (Premodern.) T. Nguyen.
Concentrations

AV/AS 246. Visual Narratives: Storytelling in East Asian Art.

This course examines the important artistic tradition of narrative painting in China and Japan. Through study of visually narrative presentations of religious, historical, and popular stories, the course explores different contexts in which the works—tomb, wall, and scroll paintings—were produced. The course introduces various modes of visual analysis and art-historical contexts. Topics include narrative theory, text-image relationships, elite patronage, and gender representation. Open to first-year students. (Non-Western Canon.) T. Nguyen.
Concentrations

AV/AS 247. The Art of Zen Buddhism.

The art of Zen (Chan) as the unique and unbounded expression of the liberated mind has attracted Westerners since the mid-twentieth century. But what is Zen, its art, and its culture? This course considers the historical development of Zen art and its use in several genres within monastic and lay settings. It also examines the underlying Buddhist concepts of Zen art. The course aims to help students understand the basic teachings of Zen and their expression in architecture, gardens, sculpture, painting, poetry, and calligraphy. Recommended background: AV/AS 243. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 30. (Non-Western Canon.) T. Nguyen.
Concentrations

AS/RE 249. The Hindu Tradition.

An examination, through the use of primary and secondary texts, of the various traditions of Hinduism, with some consideration of their relation to Jainism and Indian Buddhism. Special attention is paid to the Vedas, Upanishads, and Bhagavad-Gita, as well as to the classical myths of Hinduism embodied in the Puranas, and to ritual and devotional practices. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 40. A. Melnick.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

AS/RE 250. The Buddhist Tradition.

The course focuses on the Buddha's life and teachings; on early Buddhism in India and the rise of various Buddhist schools of thought; on the development of Mahayana philosophies; on rituals, meditation, and other forms of expression in India and Southeast Asia. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 40. A. Melnick.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

AS/RE 251. Religions of Tibet.

Tibetan religions are a complex mixture of Indian, Chinese, and indigenous elements. This course focuses on the history, doctrines, practices, literatures, major personalities, and communities of the different religious traditions that are expressions of this mixture, including the rNying ma, bKa' brgyud, Sa skya, and dGe lugs sects of Buddhism as well as the Bön and "folk" traditions. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 40. A. Melnick.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

AS/MU 252. Musics of Southeast Asia.

Designed for students interested in performing arts cultures based outside the West, this course introduces selected historical and contemporary musical traditions of mainland and island Southeast Asia. The integration of music, dance, theater, and ritual is a unifying theme of the course. Special attention is given to historical and contemporary gong-chime cultures of the region. The study of Southeast Asian arts contributes to students' understanding of the region. Several practical sessions, in which students learn to play instruments of the Bates Gamelan Ensemble, enhance the grasp of formal principles common to a variety of Southeast Asian musics. Prerequisite(s): any course in music or Asian studies. Open to first-year students. [W2] G. Fatone.
Concentrations

INDC 255. Modern Japanese Women Writers.

How have modern Japanese women writers portrayed the complexities of their lives and the worlds in which they lived? How do they negotiate the gendered institutions of the society in which they live? How has their work shaped what is known as "Japanese literature" within and outside of Japan? Students consider issues such as family, friendship, power, gender roles, selfhood, the female body, and aging in reading a range of novels, short stories, and poems. Supplemental readings provide background in Japanese literary history and gender theory. Selected authors include Higuchi Ichiyō, Hayashi Fumiko, Enchi Fumiko, Ohba Minako, Kurahashi Yumiko, Tawara Machi, and Kawakami Mieko. Readings and discussion are in English. No prior experience studying Japanese culture necessary. Cross-listed in Asian studies, Japanese, and women and gender studies. Open to first-year students. [W2] J. Sturiano.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

AS/PY 260. Cultural Psychology.

This course provides an introduction to the theoretical perspectives and research findings of cultural psychology, with an emphasis on comparisons between North American and East Asian cultural groups. Topics include defining culture as a topic of psychological inquiry; the methods of conducting cultural research; the debate between universality versus cultural specificity of psychological processes; acculturation and multiculturalism; and cultural influences on thought, emotion, motivation, personality, abnormality, and social behavior. Prerequisite(s): PSYC 101. Enrollment limited to 50. (Diversity.) Normally offered every year. H. Boucher.
Concentrations

INDC 266. Environmental History of China.

This course investigates the deep historical roots that lie behind China's contemporary environmental dilemmas. From the Three Gorges Dam to persistent smog, a full understanding of the environment in China must reckon with millennia-old relationships between human and natural systems. In this course studenst explore the advent of grain agriculture, religious understandings of nature, the impact of bureaucratic states, and the environmental dimensions of imperial expansion as well as the nature of kinship and demographic change. The course concludes by turning to the socialist "conquest" of nature in the 1950s and 1960s and China's post-1980s fate. Cross-listed in Asian studies, environmental studies, and history. New course beginning Winter 2017. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 40. (East Asian.) W. Chaney.

AS/HI 274. China in Revolution.

Modern China's century of revolutions, from the disintegration of the traditional empire in the late nineteenth century, through the twentieth-century attempts at reconstruction, to the tenuous stability of the post-Maoist regime. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 40. (East Asian.) (Modern. ) Normally offered every year. W. Chaney.
Concentrations

AS/RE 308. Buddhist Texts in Translation.

This seminar involves the close reading and discussion of a number of texts representing a variety of Buddhist traditions. Emphasis is placed on several different genres including canonical sutras, commentarial exegeses, philosophical treatises, and popular legends. Prerequisite(s): AS/RE 250, AN/RE 263, or AV/AS 243. Enrollment limited to 15. [W2] A. Melnick.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

AS/RE 309. Buddhism in East Asia.

This seminar focuses on the teachings, traditions, and contemplative practices of a number of East Asian schools of Buddhism, including the Tiantai (Tendai), Huayan (Kegon), Chan (Zen), Zhenyan (Shingon), and Pure Land traditions. Special consideration is given to the question of the continuities and discontinuities in the ways these schools became established in China, Korea, and Japan. Prerequisite(s): one of the following: AS/RE 208, 209, or 250. Enrollment limited to 15. [W2] A. Melnick.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

AS/CI 312. Kungfu Cinemas: Asia and Beyond.

Kungfu cinema has its icons—Bruce Lee, Jackie Chan, and Jet Li—and new Kungfu movies premiere every year. What is Kungfu cinema? What are its origins, sources, influences, different schools, and contemporary manifestations in China, Japan, India, Europe, and Hollywood? How have Kungfu films participated in fashioning national identity, body image, gender perception, and nation building in Asia and beyond? Students consider these questions by closely watching, analyzing, and interpreting a variety of Kungfu films. Enrollment limited to 15. Y. Liu.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

ASIA 320. Individual and Society in East Asia.

This advanced seminar provides key tools for the study of modern and contemporary East Asia. It takes a multidisciplinary approach, giving attention to literature, film, music, visual and performing arts, and makes use of a heterogeneous body of texts including primary sources, theoretical framing, and secondary literature. Topics include the construction of national and personal identity, gender, sexuality, mass media, and consumer culture, and the continued relevance and redifinition of traditional culture in contemporary society. This course is designed for students who have traveled in East Asia or have a significant background in one or more aspects of East Asian cultures, as it lends theoretical perspectives to students' experiences. The course also aims to strengthen senior thesis proposals in East Asian studies. Prerequisite(s): two courses in Asian studies. Normally offered every year. H. Weetman.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

AS/RE 348. Epics of Asia: Myth and Religion.

This course considers the intersection of religion and society in Asia through the lens of popular Asian myths. Students examine how religious doctrine, ideals, and art have influenced the creation and interpretation of this unique narrative form, while also learning about specific Asian traditions. Close study of several tales, including narratives from India, Thailand, China, Tibet, and Japan, include reading texts in translation as well as viewing cinematic and theatrical representations of myths intended for popular audiences. Students explore the dialogic process of myth by creating their own modern versions of one text. Enrollment limited to 15. A. Melnick.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

ASIA 360. Independent Study.

Students, in consultation with a faculty advisor, individually design and plan a course of study or research not offered in the curriculum. Course work includes a reflective component, evaluation, and completion of an agreed-upon product. Sponsorship by a faculty member in the program/department, a course prospectus, and permission of the chair are required. Students may register for no more than one independent study per semester. Normally offered every semester. Staff.
Interdisciplinary Programs

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

ASIA 457. Senior Thesis.

An extended research project on a topic relevant to East Asian society and culture that adopts one or more of the disciplinary approaches represented in the Asian studies curriculum. Students register for 457 in the fall semester or for 458 in the winter semester unless the Asian studies program committee gives approval for a two-semester project. Majors invited to pursue honors register for 457 and 458, contingent on the approval of the program committee. [W3] Staff.
Interdisciplinary Programs

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

ASIA 458. Senior Thesis.

An extended research project on a topic revelant to East Asian society and culture that adopts one or more of the disciplinary approaches represented in the Asian Studies curriculum. Students register for 457 in the fall semester or for 458 in the winter semester unless the Asian studies program committee gives approval for a two-semester project. Majors invited to pursue honors register for 457 and 458, contingent on the approval of the program committee. [W3] Staff.
Interdisciplinary Programs

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

Short Term Courses

INDC s10. Between Past and Future: Contemporary Chinese Art since 1980.

A book "from the sky" with imagined characters, Mao in a Mickey Mouse costume, a nude and pregnant self-portrait, the act of repeatedly "stamping" the water with a seal in Tibet: these are snapshots of Chinese contemporary art since 1980. This course examines the exhilarating last three decades of Chinese art. While focusing on the shadow of tradition in contemporary image making, topics also include gender and sexuality, political expression and activism, private and public spaces, and questions of historiography. Cross-listed in art and visual culture, Asian studies, and Chinese. Not open to students who have received credit for AV/AS 175. Enrollment limited to 30. Y. Liu.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

AV/AS s16. Understanding Vietnam: Its History and Culture.

In this course students consider a wide range of Vietnamese history and culture through a multidisciplinary lens. Students explore Vietnam within the framework and context of specific historical and visual culture, ranging from ancient monuments to contemporary sites. Students visit a variety of field sites including national museums, historical monuments, imperial palaces and tombs, and traditional craft villages as well as important sites of battles during the Vietnam War. Students discuss background texts and field trip experiences in light of their historical and cultural contexts. Recommended background: AVC 245 or s29. Enrollment limited to 14. Instructor permission is required. T. Nguyen.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

AS/JA s21. Japan: A Culture of Four Seasons.

“Does your country have four seasons?" Many who travel to Japan are caught off-guard by this seemingly simple and oft-asked question. The impetus behind the inquiry, however, is not nearly as superficial or mundane as it might seem. In this course students explore Japanese expressions of kisetsukan—a "sensitivity to the seasons”—to understand how an ideological sensitivity to nature and temporality have shaped dominant cultural practices from poetry, literature, and visual media to food, fashion, and festivals. Readings, screenings, tastings, and hands-on creative projects are designed to cultivate an embodied experience for all participants. Enrollment limited to 30. Staff.

AS/JA s24. Transfiguring Desire in Japanese Culture: The Legend of Ono no Komachi from Noh Drama to Anime.

How did a ninth-century Japanese female poet end up with her name on a bag of rice? Only a handful of Ono no Komachi’s poems survive, yet her name is a cultural byword in Japan that conjures up an ideal of classical beauty as well as images both of a sensuous lover and an abandoned old hag. This course traces the evolving figure of Komachi in Japanese culture, considering matters of gender, taste, patronage, and politics. Coursework encourages creative engagement with theater, literature, art, and pop culture. Conducted in English; readings are in English and no prior familiarity with Japanese culture is required. New course beginning Short Term 2017. Enrollment limited to 30. One-time offering. H. Weetman.

ASIA s50. Independent Study.

Students, in consultation with a faculty advisor, individually design and plan a course of study or research not offered in the curriculum. Course work includes a reflective component, evaluation, and completion of an agreed-upon product. Sponsorship by a faculty member in the program/department, a course prospectus, and permission of the chair are required. Students may register for no more than one independent study per semester. Normally offered every year. Staff.
Interdisciplinary Programs

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)