Bates Fall Semester Abroad, Germany

Bates Fall Semester Abroad, Germany

Professors Kazecki, Cernahoschi and Greer

About the Program
The program starts in late August and concludes in mid-December 2015. It begins with a four-week intensive German course taught by an experienced Berlin-based instructor. Students will be placed according to their abilities, from beginner to advanced. After this intensive course, participants continue their study of German.

Throughout the semester, students also take two courses with Bates faculty. These courses serve as co-requisites for each other. The course Mapping the City: The Urban Landscape as Text (with Prof. Jakub Kazecki and Prof. Raluca Cernahoschi, German and Russian Studies) satisfies the W1 or W2 writing requirement. The Culture, Controversy, Cryptography, Calculus (with Prof. Meredith Greer, Mathematics) course satisfies the Quantitative (Q) requirement.

Courses

BSAG 003. Intensive German I.

Open to first-year students. Staff.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

BSAG 004. Intensive German II.

Open to first-year students. Staff.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

BSAG 009. Mapping the City: The Urban Landscape as Text.

Reading a text or watching a film about a city is a process of imagining its space. We are not only creating a mental map of buildings, stores, squares and parks, but also tracking the walks of fictional characters on the streets, getting a sense of the city’s dimensions in space and taking in its architectural and human character. The physical city and its narratives overlap and comment on one another — but sometimes also contradict each other. By exploring narratives about Berlin in Berlin, we draw our own maps of the city and compare them with the existing urban landscape. We follow the traces of the Berlin Wall in the streets, place destroyed buildings back on the skyline of the German capital, discover its empty spaces, hear the voices of its missing inhabitants, and see bridges between its cultures and languages. We engage with contemporary Berlin as a multilayered area in which people experience and interact with the past through language, architecture, literature and the visual arts. This course is taught in English. Open to first-year students. [W2] [W1] J. Kazecki, R. Cernahoschi.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

BSAG 010. Culture, Controversy, Cryptography, Calculus.

German history is filled with groundbreaking discoveries that have changed art and science worldwide. Modern-day Berlin is both a hub for ongoing invention and a home for museums that showcase ancient and modern innovations. This course highlights many of these German contributions—to art, architecture, music, military strategy, and more—from the perspective of mathematics. Topics will include code making and breaking in World War II; trailblazing connections between fractals and infinity that were at first harshly rejected; the hundreds-year-old controversy over who invented calculus; and types of symmetry employed by Babylonians, Greeks, and Romans in ancient buildings on display in Berlin. Students in this course will each select a relevant topic, according to their interests, for in-depth study. No background in German or college mathematics is required for this course. Open to first-year students. [Q] M. Greer.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations