Bates Fall Semester Abroad, Germany

Bates Fall Semester Abroad, Germany

Associate Professor Greer (Mathematics); Assistant Professors Cernahoschi and Kazecki


During the fall semester of 2015, Bates students, including entering first-year students, can experience the excitement of living and learning in Berlin, Germany. A meeting point of past and present, Berlin has played a major role in world history and is a vibrant setting for contemporary culture. One of the most important intellectual powers in Europe in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, Berlin is home to two world-class universities and many research institutes, which profoundly affected the development of mathematics and science and changed culture and politics far beyond Germany's borders. Berlin also illustrates the tragic course of the twentieth century: the rise of totalitarian regimes, two world wars, and the post-World War II division of the city, the country, and the continent.

Since the fall of the Berlin Wall and German reunification, Berlin has risen rapidly as a symbol of change in the New Europe. Today it is the capital of Germany's largest economy and is a young and energetic cosmopolitan center. Berlin's proximity to the Polish border invites exploration of the region's multicultural landscape, its changing borders, and the social transition of former communist countries such as the German Democratic Republic and Poland after 1989.

The Fall Semester Abroad program in Berlin offers students the opportunity to deepen their understanding of European history, immerse themselves in German culture, and enhance their proficiency in German language. The program begins in late August with a four-week intensive German course; students are placed based on their ability. After the intensive German course, students continue their study of German throughout the semester, and take two courses with Bates faculty. Program trips bring students to Bavaria, the coast of the Baltic Sea, and Poland. No prior knowledge of German is required.

Courses

BSAG 003. Intensive German I.

Courses at novice, intermediate, and advanced levels are designed to help students communicate with their surroundings. course work focuses on the rapid improvement of comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Open to first-year students. Staff.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

BSAG 004. Intensive German II.

Courses at novice, intermediate, and advanced levels are designed to help students communicate with their surroundings. course work focuses on the rapid improvement of comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Open to first-year students. Staff.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

BSAG 009. Mapping the City: The Urban Landscape as Text.

When reading a text or watching a film about a city we imagine its space, creating mental maps of buildings, squares, and parks, and taking in the architectural and human character of the place. By exploring narratives about Berlin in Berlin, students draw their own maps of the city and compare them with existing urban landscape. They follow the traces of the Berlin Wall, place destroyed buildings back on the skyline, discover the city's empty spaces, listen to the voices of its missing inhabitants, and cross bridges between cultures and languages, interacting with the past through language, architecture, literature, and the visual arts. Conducted in English. Open to first-year students. [W2] [W1] J. Kazecki, R. Cernahoschi.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

BSAG 010. Culture, Controversy, Cryptography, Calculus.

German history is filled with groundbreaking discoveries that have changed art and science around the world. Contemporary Berlin is both a hub of ongoing invention and a home to museums that showcase ancient and modern innovations. This course highlights many German contributions to art, architecture, music, military strategy, and other fields from the perspective of mathematics. Topics include code making and breaking in World War II; trailblazing connections between fractals and infinity that were initially rejected; the centuries-old debate over who invented calculus; and the symmetry employed by Babylonians, Greeks, and Romans and adopted by architects in Berlin. Students select a topic based on their interests for in-depth study. No background in college-level mathematics is required. Conducted in English. Open to first-year students. [Q] M. Greer.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations