Spanish

Professors Fra-Molinero and López; Associate Professor Aburto Guzmán; Assistant Professor Pettway; Visiting Assistant Professor Pridgeon; Senior Lecturer George (chair)



Spanish is a cross-national and global language. It is the second language of the United States, and the first language of over 400 million people in Latin America, Europe, and Africa. It is a vehicle for myriad cultural expressions that find audiences far beyond its traditional trans-Atlantic axis to Asia and the Pacific, and it has given voice to struggles for social justice that have echoed around the world.

The Department of Spanish responds to the cultural richness and diversity of the people who speak Spanish as well as to the obligations and opportunities of a globalized world through a threefold mission:

1) the department enables students to acquire a strong and useful proficiency in Spanish that allows them to navigate cultural spaces in which over 400 million people interact worldwide.

2) the department fosters the development of interpretative skills and contextual knowledge to engage critically a broad range of cultural productions originating in the Spanish-speaking world.

3) the department contributes to the study of the humanities through a curriculum of courses taught in Spanish that includes studies of Latin American, Spanish and U.S. Latino literature, media and visual arts, covering an array of historical periods, and informed by diverse and varied theoretical approaches.

More information on the Spanish department is available on the website (bates.edu/Spanish/).

Learning Goals. The Department of Spanish has the following goals for Spanish majors and minors:

1) to understand spoken and written Spanish in a variety of linguistic registers and social contexts;

2) to communicate in Spanish orally in real-life situations and in interpersonal contexts;

3) to demonstrate presentation skills in Spanish, effectively discussing orally and in writing complex topics related to fields of academic study;

4) to display interpretative skills in Spanish (reading, viewing, and listening), engaging critically a broad range of cultural productions originating in the Spanish-speaking world;

5) to be conversant with Latin American, Spanish, and U.S. Latino literatures, media, and visual arts, across historical periods, applying diverse theoretical approaches to the study of the Spanish-speaking world.

Major Requirements for the Class of 2019 and beyond. The major consists of ten courses above SPAN 202, plus a thesis or portfolio, including:

1) SPAN 205. Advanced Spanish, which may be waived for heritage speakers or for students who have completed part of their secondary education in a Spanish-speaking country.

2) SPAN 210. Writing Spanish.

3) SPAN 211. Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis.

4) Four elective courses, which may include a combination of the following:
a) 200-level courses above SPAN 211.
b) one Short Term course offered by the Spanish department.
c) one course taught in English and cross-listed in Spanish and another department or program (e.g., African American studies, American cultural studies, European studies, Latin American studies, women and gender studies).
d) courses taken in an approved off-campus study program in a Spanish-speaking country (per study-abroad guidelines below).

5) Three 300-level courses on the literatures or cultures of Spain or Latin America taught in Spanish by Bates faculty; the required 200-level courses must be completed prior to taking these courses. Students studying for two semesters in a Spanish-speaking country need only complete two 300-level courses.

6) A capstone project, thesis, or portfolio that demonstrates proficiency in Spanish and competency in Hispanic cultural studies. This may be a literary or cultural analysis of a topic related to the Hispanic world, a creative project, a translation, or a digital portfolio. Thesis writers register for SPAN 457 in the fall, and for SPAN 457 and 458 if completing an honors thesis.

Major Requirements for the Class of 2018. The major consists of ten courses above SPAN 202 (formerly 207), plus a thesis or portfolio, including:

1) SPAN 205. Advanced Spanish, which may be waived for heritage speakers or students who have completed part of their secondary education in a Spanish-speaking country.

2) Two courses from among the following:
SPAN 210. Writing Spanish.
SPAN 211. Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis.
SPAN 230 (formerly 215). Readings in Spanish American Literature.
SPAN 231 (formerly 216). Readings in Spanish Literature.

3) Four elective courses above SPAN 211, which may include:
a) one Short term course offered by the Spanish department;
b) one course taught in English by Spanish faculty and offered in African American studies, American cultural studies, European studies, Latin American studies, or women and gender studies;
c) courses taken in an approved off-campus study program in a Spanish-speaking country.

4) Three 300-level courses on the literatures or cultures of Spain or Latin America taught in Spanish by Bates faculty.

5) A capstone project, thesis, or portfolio that demonstrates proficiency in Spanish and competency in literary and cultural analysis. This may be a literary or cultural analysis of a topic related to the Spanish-speaking world, a creative project, a translation, or a digital portfolio. Thesis writers register for SPAN 457 in the fall, and for SPAN 457 and 458 if completing an honors thesis.

Major requirements for the Class of 2017. The requirements for the major consist of ten courses beyond SPAN 202, including,

1) At least two 200-level courses beyond SPAN 205.

2) At least one 300-level course.

3) At least two seminars on the literatures or cultural histories of Spain or Latin America (400-level) taught by Bates faculty, usually taken during the senior year.

One Short Term course offered by the Spanish department may be counted toward the major.

In addition, majors must complete a senior thesis (SPAN 457 or 458) written in Spanish. This may be a literary or cultural analysis of any topic related to the Hispanic world. Honors candidates register for SPAN 457 and 458.

Spanish and Latin American Studies Double Majors. Students double-majoring in Spanish and Latin American studies may apply only one course to both the Spanish major and Latin American studies major.

Minor in Spanish. A minor requires a minimum of seven courses in Spanish above SPAN 103. At least one of the seven courses must be a 300-level course offered by Bates faculty, which may be taught in Spanish or a cross-listed course taught in English. One Short Term course offered by the Spanish department may be counted toward the minor. Advanced Placement courses may not be counted toward the minor.

Study Abroad. Spanish majors are encouraged to gain proficiency in the language through the experience of studying in a Spanish-speaking country. For the major a maximum of three credits is normally recognized for one semester, and five credits for two semesters of study in an approved program. For a minor the maximum number is two credits for one semester and three credits for two semesters. Students are encouraged to speak with their Spanish advisor regarding course offerings, before going abroad, otherwise credit toward the major or minor is not guaranteed.

Pass/Fail Grading Option. The use of the pass/fail option is restricted to one course within the major and the minor but may not be elected for the 300-level course.

Credit Transfer. Courses taken at other institutions in languages other than Spanish are not given credit by the department.

Courses

SPAN 103. Accelerated Elementary Spanish.

Designed for students with prior experience in Spanish or another Romance language and for highly self-motivated students who wish to begin Spanish, the course reviews essential constructions and vocabulary. The course emphasizes oral proficiency and the development of reading and writing skills while fostering a cross-cultural understanding of the Spanish-speaking world with authentic texts and media. Not open to juniors or seniors. Not open to students who have received credit for SPAN 101 or 102. Enrollment limited to 22. Normally offered every year. Staff.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

SPAN 201. Intermediate Spanish I.

Designed to increase students' vocabulary and to improve mastery of speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills. The course provides a thorough review of grammar as well as an emphasis on conversational proficiency, expository writing, and Hispanic culture. Prerequisite(s): SPAN 103. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 22 per section. Normally offered every year. Staff.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

SPAN 202. Intermediate Spanish II.

Intensive practice in reading, composition, and conversation, as well as attention to selected grammar problems. The course focuses on discussion through visual presentations and selections of Hispanic literature, art, and culture. Prerequisite(s): SPAN 201. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 22 per section. Normally offered every year. Staff.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

SPAN 205. Advanced Spanish.

This course develops advanced skill in reading and writing as well as oral fluency and aural acuity through classroom activities and written assignments based on literary and nonliterary texts and audiovisual media. It introduces analytical and interpretative strategies necessary to engage and decode the breadth and variety of cultural productions originating in the Spanish-speaking world. Not open to students returning from off-campus study in a Spanish-speaking country. Not open to students who have received credit for SPAN 207. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 20. Normally offered every semester. Staff.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

SPAN 210. Writing Spanish.

This course teaches skills useful for writing in upper-level courses, the senior thesis, or the senior portfolio in Spanish. Students develop the ability to be flexible and versatile writers in Spanish in a variety of forms of academic writing (narrative, descriptive, expositive, argumentative) and learn the importance of the writing process (drafting, revision, rewriting, editing). The course also expands students' understanding of research and writing as tools for creating and communicating knowledge of the Spanish- speaking world by encouraging them to use Spanish to ask, research, and answer questions of significance and importance. Prerequisite(s): SPAN 205. Enrollment limited to 25. [W2] Normally offered every year. Staff.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

SPAN 211. Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis.

In this course students learn the basic tools, concepts, and terminology of textual analysis. They become familiar with recent critical approaches to the study of modern Spanish and Spanish American literary and cultural work. Prerequisite(s): SPAN 205. Open to first-year students. [W2] Normally offered every year. Staff.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

SPAN 222. Short Narrative in the Spanish-speaking World.

This course considers the development, functions, and varieties of short narrative in the Spanish-speaking world. Students examine the thematic content of stories in light of sociohistorical contexts, and explore the evolution of the elements and language of story-telling in terms of categories of literary periodization. Prerequisite(s): SPAN 210 or 211. Enrollment limited to 30. Normally offered every other year. Staff.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

SPAN 224. Protest and Justice.

At different times and in different countries, many Hispanic writers, filmmakers, and other artists have felt compelled to create works that confront various types of social injustice. These range from the effects of imperialism to political repression, and often address issues of race, sexuality, gender, and class. In this course students analyze such "texts" within their respective social, political, and historical contexts. Prerequisites(s): SPAN 210 or 211. Enrollment limited to 25. Staff.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

SPAN 226. Gender, Race and Sexuality.

This course examines Spanish and Latin American literatures and other cultural productions at the intersections of race, gender, and sexuality. It studies not only the delight and the dangers inherent in representations of sexuality, but also how definitions of race and gender form dominant ideas about sexual practices in the Spanish-speaking world. Students become familiar with patterns, shifts, and ruptures in discourses about these issues across different sociopolitical contexts, and apply specific theories and conceptual tools for reading and understanding the myriad complexities of Latin American and Spanish identities. Prerequisite(s): SPAN 210 or 211. Not open to seniors. Enrollment limited to 30. Staff.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

SPAN 228. Screen and Media.

This course examines the complex relationship between literature and screen media in terms of 1) the representative possibilities and limits each offer for the exploration and projection of relevant social, political, and cultural issues and 2) the processes, through study of different theoretical and aesthetic approaches, creators use to adapt works from one mode to the other. Through the analysis of literary and audiovisual productions from Latin America, Spain, and the United States, students engage the theoretical, technical, and practical debates among institutions, producers, and consumers that emerge in the process of transposing discourse across media forms. Prerequisite(s): SPAN 210 or 211. Not open to seniors. Not open to students who have received credit for SPAN 217. Staff.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

SPAN 230. Readings in Spanish American and Caribbean Literature.

Students engage representative readings from Spanish American and Caribbean literatures dating from the colonial period to the late nineteenth century. Literature regarding African, indigenous, and European conflict, exchange, and negotiation in the Caribbean are studied as the first locus of colonial encounters. Early developments in Spanish American literature take center stage as hispanoamericans construct their intellectual autonomy through artistic expression. The course emphasizes Spanish American nationalisms and contestatory literatures that provide divergent gendered, sexual, and racial viewpoints. The course is a multi-genre review that includes essay, chronicle, poetry, and theater. Prerequisite(s): SPAN 210 or 211. Not open to students who have received credit for SPAN 215. Open to first-year students. Normally offered every year. C. Aburto Guzmán, M. Pettway.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

SPAN 231. Readings in Spanish Literature.

What are the points of convergence and divergence between Spain and Europe? How has Spain articulated itself as European? How and by what motives has Spain emphasized its difference vis-à-vis Europe? In this course, students consider these questions through the reading of representative literary works by Spanish writers from all periods in light of the European context in which they were crafted. Students pay special attention to how broad, sweeping historical processes that stand as markers of European identity such as wars, revolutions, and cultural and philosophical movements are reflected in Spanish literature. Central themes include religion and expansion, modern monarchies and the making of the "people," the invention of the nation and the ideal citizen, and postcolonial disorders. Prerequisite(s): SPAN 210 or 211. Not open to students who have received credit for SPAN 216. Open to first-year students. [W2] Normally offered every year. D. George.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

INDC 290. The Afro-Hispanic Diaspora.

The 500-year presence of Africans and their descendants in the Spanish-speaking world has produced a significant body of literature by blacks and about blacks. Spanish America was the main destination of the African diaspora. Afro-Hispanic writers attest to the struggle for freedom and the abolition of slavery. Their literature shows how the participation of blacks in the wars of Latin American independence was a struggle for their emancipation. Afro-Hispanic writers in Spain, the Americas, and Africa use their art and ideas to address the postnational migrations of the twenty-first century, a diaspora that has not ceased. Recommended background: AAS 100. Cross-listed in African American studies, Latin American studies, and Spanish.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

SPAN 301. Introduction to Translation.

An introduction to the basic principles of translation: theories, methods, and techniques. With an emphasis on practical issues related to both language and culture, students focus on linguistic structure, text analysis, idiomatic expressions, and cultural specificities. Students improve their knowledge of the Spanish language and develop their translation skills through extensive practice both in the classroom and beyond. Prerequisite(s): one 200-level Spanish course above SPAN 211. Enrollment limited to 15. F. López.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

INDC 321. Afroambiente: Writing a Black Environment.

This course studies the response of black writers and intellectuals of the Spanish-speaking world to issues related to the natural environment. In three countries, Ecuador, Puerto Rico, and Equatorial Guinea, modernity has brought serious challenges to notions of economic progress, human rights, and national sovereignty, as well as individual and communal identity. Course materials include written texts from local newspapers and magazines as well as other sources of information such as Internet sites that discuss issues related to the environment and the arts. All readings are in English. Cross-listed in African American studies, environmental studies, Latin American Studies, and Spanish. Prerequisite(s): one 200-level Spanish course above SPAN 205.
Concentrations

SP/WS 323. Gendered Experiences in the Américas Borderlands.

Students become acquainted with testimonies, film, comics, and fiction and nonfiction narratives that engage border tensions and issues of immigration in English and Spanish. Concepts such as sense of place, mobility, and permanence; histories of place; place of enunciation; transnational migration; and transnational historical networks are utilized as critical lenses to analyze gendered experiences of migration. All discussions and written assignments are in Spanish. Recommended background: SPAN 230. Prerequisite(s): one 200-level Spanish course above SPAN 211. Not open to students who have received credit for SPAN 223. C. Aburto Guzmán.
Concentrations

EU/SP 324. Memories of Civil War in European Film and Literature.

Issues of memory and postmemory are one of the most relevant concerns in contemporary European culture. This course explores how these concerns are represented in film and narratives of several European civil wars in the twentieth century. Although the main focus is on representations of the Spanish conflict, students also consider the cases of the former Yugoslavia, Ireland, and Greece. Theories of memory (cultural and collective) and postmemory provide the framework for textual and cultural analysis. Recommended background: at least one course on Spanish (Spain), French, German, Russian, or English literature. Enrollment limited to 15. F. López.
Concentrations

SPAN 330. Writing the Caribbean Nation: Race, Religion, and Revolution.

This course examines the twentieth-century novel and short story of Spanish Caribbean nations Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic, and Cuba. Students explore the sociocultural place of Catholicism, African descendant spirituality, and race in considering the ways Caribbean nations consecrate certain forms of religious practice while denigrating others. Race is studied in terms of the allocation of visible as well as less perceptible socioeconomic benefits. Critical writing, literary analysis, and the contextualization of the text are skills developed in this course. Recommended background: SPAN 230. Prerequisite: one 200-level Spanish course above SPAN 211. M. Pettway.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

SPAN 332. Engendering Race and Embodying Sexuality in Afro-latin America.

Engendering Race and Embodying Sexuality in Afro-Latin AmericaThe "Caribbean" is not only a geographic designation, but also defines myriad social spaces, some of which are nestled within urban communities in the United States. Those inhabiting these social spaces inexorably face the challenge of negotiating linguistic, cultural, and racial, and gender differences. In this course students examine literary, musical, and visual representations of masculinity and femininity in the Spanish-speaking Caribbean. Students examine Dominican, Cuban, and Puerto Rican short stories, novels, traditional music as well as Spanish-language hip hop. Through close readings and cultural studies analysis, this course tackles the thorny, complex, and contradictory nature of gender, sexual, and racial/ethnic performance among Spanish-speaking Caribbeans in the United States and abroad. Prerequisitie(s): one 200-level Spanish course above SPAN 211. Recommended background: SPAN 211, 222, 224, 226, 230, 231. Not open to students who have received credit for SPAN 232. Enrollment limited to 30. Normally offered every other year. M. Pettway.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

SPAN 341. Cervantes.

A careful reading and a comprehensive formal and thematic study of Don Quijote de la Mancha. This course examines in particular the representation of the Muslim Other in this work. The effects of Don Quijote on the development of the novel as a genre are seen in relation to giving voice to women and cultural, social, and political minorities. Prerequisite(s): one 200-level Spanish course above SPAN 211. Recommended background: SPAN 231. B. Fra-Molinero.
Concentrations

SPAN 343. Postcolonial Thought in Latin America.

This course examines Latin American intellectual inquiry on postcoloniality in dialogue with transnational postcolonial thought. The course considers critical readings of recent work by Spanish American scholars, authors, poets, and filmmakers. Theoretical work may be in English; the class is conducted in Spanish and all student work is in Spanish. Prerequisite(s): one 200-level Spanish course above SPAN 211. Enrollment limited to 20. C. Aburto Guzmán.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

SP/WS 344. Gendering Social Awareness in Contemporary Spain.

In this course, students use gender as the main category of analysis, paying particular attention to its interconnectedness with power. Carefully examining texts written by women in contemporary Spain, students explore the deliberate use of gender as a lens through which to understand different forms of domination—economic, political, and social. Prerequisite(s): one 200-level Spanish course above SPAN 211. Recommended background: SPAN 230. Instructor permission is required. F. López.
Concentrations

SPAN 345. Twentieth-Century Spanish Drama.

In this course, students consider drama from a cultural-studies perspective, paying attention to the representation of social, political, and cultural matters in twentieth- and twenty-first-century Spain. The course focuses on how playwrights use different dramatic trends to address such themes as censorship, exile, gender, memory, and migration. The authors discussed are representative and inclusive, ranging from Lorca and Buero Vallejo to Paloma Pedrero and Itziar Pascual. Prerequisite(s): one 200-level Spanish course above SPAN 211. Recommended background: SPAN 231. F. López.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

SPAN 347. Building Memory: Narratives of the Spanish Civil War.

The Spanish Civil War is both an important historical landmark and the main theme of myriad literary and film narratives produced since the establishment of democracy in Spain. In this seminar, students consider the increasing popularity of fictional representations of this armed conflict, its political antecedent (Segunda República), and its consequence (el régimen de Francisco Franco). What is the role of these narratives? What do they say about the roots of Spanish democratic traditions? How do they negotiate conflict? What type of Spain do they propose? Prerequisite(s): one 200-level Spanish course above SPAN 211. Recommended background: SPAN 231. Enrollment limited to 15. F. López.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

AA/SP 350. Representing Blacks in Cuban Literature: From the Colony to the Revolution.

This course examines innovations and shifts in the representation of African descendants in Cuban literature. Students read narrative pieces, essays, letters, and poetry written by and about blacks from the early colonial period to the revolutionary era. Adapting an in-depth multidisciplinary approach, black as object is critically analyzed in opposition to literary and historical texts that construct black as subject. Race, religion, slavery, and gender as well as the formation of Afro-Cuban subjectivities are the primary topics of study, revealing the black struggle against multiple structures of domination as well as the resilience to negotiate with power. Prerequisite(s): one-level Spanish course above SPAN 211. Recommended background: SPAN 230. M. Pettway.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

EU/SP 351. Iberian Modernisms: Modernity, Literature and Crisis in Portugal and Spain.

This course explores literary and artistic responses to the social, political, and cultural crises of modernity in Portugal and Spain from 1890 to 1934. It traces the emergence of the concept of the "modern" in early twentieth-century Europe, and examines the particular forms and content of Iberian modernism in terms of language, the unconscious, sexuality and gender, religion, liberalism, Europe as Other, empire, and cosmopolitanism. Students discuss works translated into English by Portuguese and Spanish authors such as Antonio Machado, Fernando Pessoa, Pio Baroja, Concha Espina, and Mário Sá-Caneiro as well as contemporary film, art, and critical readings in history and cultural theory. Recommended background: at least one course on Spanish (Spain), French, German, Russian, or English literature. Enrollment limited to 15. D. George.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

SPAN 360. Independent Study.

Students, in consultation with a faculty advisor, individually design and plan a course of study or research not offered in the curriculum. Course work includes a reflective component, evaluation, and completion of an agreed-upon product. Sponsorship by a faculty member in the program/department, a course prospectus, and permission of the chair are required. Students may register for no more than one independent study per semester. Normally offered every semester. Staff.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

EU/SP 366. Iberian Nightmares: Fantasy and Horror in Spanish and Portuguese Cinemas.

This course explores the genres of fantasy and horror in Spanish and Portuguese cinemas from the silent era to the present. It considers how such films represent the supernatural, the diabolical, evil violence, fear, paranoia, and magic; create, perpetuate, and subvert categories of gender, class, race, and sexuality; and adapt and participate in key European literary and cinematic genres such as the Gothic, parody, adventure, family drama, magical realism, and science fiction. Special attention is given to how these particular forms of popular cinema reinterpret Iberian traditions at the same they reflect the anxieties of contemporary Spanish and Portuguese societies vis-à-vis processes of modernization, democratization, integration in Europe and globalization. Taught in English. Recommended background: RHET 120, 240, or SPAN 228 or other introductory film studies course. Enrollment limited to 20. D. George.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

SPAN 368. Realismo.

This course studies the emergence and evolution of the Realist novel in late-nineteenth-century Spain as an aesthetic response to the vast social, political and cultural changes wrought by the uneven processes of modernity. Special attention is given to how Spanish writers debated, embraced, and rejected the techniques of Realism and Naturalism cultivated elsewhere in Europe, and also how they sought to revive the Spanish Realist tradition by looking to works by Cervantes, Velázquez, and Goya. Readings include novels and essays by authors such as Emilia Pardo Bazán, Juan Valera, Vicente Blasco Ibáñez, Benito Pérez Galdós and Caterina Albert, which are engaged in light of issues such as gender, class, nationalism, and religion. Recommended background: SPAN 231. Prerequisite(s): one 200-level Spanish course above SPAN 211. Enrollment limited to 20. D. George.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

SPAN 457. Senior Thesis.

A capstone project, which may take the form of a written research paper, literary or cultural analysis, translation project, creative project, or digital portfolio, designed in consultation with the faculty advisor. Students register for SPAN 457 in the fall semester. Majors writing an honors thesis register for both SPAN 457 and 458. A detailed outline and bibliography must be approved by the department. [W3] Normally offered every year. Staff.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

SPAN 458. Senior Thesis.

A continuation of SPAN 457. Majors writing an honors thesis register for both SPAN 457 and 458. [W3] Normally offered every year. Staff.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

Short Term Courses

LS/SP s21. Human Rights and Social Art in Latin America: The Case of Nogales, Mexico.

This course focuses on the social dynamics that generate social art committed to change in Latin America. Students examine three settings in which artists utilize the arts to generate aesthetic and production models that represent the "uniqueness of place." During ten days off campus, students work with artists who engage technology to raise consciousness about the "needs of place." In Nogales, Mexico, students consider human rights discourses that address migrants' dislocation. They also work with volunteers, hike the desert, and visit shelters to contextualize the social and natural environments. Prerequisite(s): SPAN 205. Enrollment limited to 15. Instructor permission is required. C. Aburto Guzmán.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

SP/WS s22. Militants, Queers, and Thugs: Latino and African American Masculinities and Social Movements.

Students engage questions about Latino and African American masculinities in the contemporary moment. How do the politics of ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and race complicate social perceptions of Latino and African American men? How do African American and Latino men take hold of narrative to construct and negotiate their gender identities? How do social-movement narratives contest stereotypical notions of Latino and black masculinity? Students analyze Puerto Rican, Dominican, and African American fiction and testimonial narrative about masculinity during the 1960s and 1970s in New York City. Students employ intersectionality, queer theory, and racial theories to consider the relationship and tensions between militancy and queerness in the formation of Latino, Afro-Latino, and African American masculinities. Conducted in English. Enrollment limited to 15. Instructor permission is required. M. Pettway.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

SPAN s29. Cinema in Spain.

This course traces the evolution of Spanish cinema from the introduction of the cinematógrafo in 1896 to the Oscar-winning films of Trueba and Almódovar of the 1990s. The study of cinema as popular entertainment, political propaganda, and as a medium for intellectual experimentation and social and political contestation draws attention to the role those working in the film industry, or at its margins, have played in shaping Spanish culture and society in the twentieth century. Particular attention is given to film genre and narrative technique, and to such theoretical concepts as national cinema, studio systems, the auteur, and gender and sexuality. Recommended background: SPAN 228. D. George.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

SPAN s30. Escritura creativa: Cuento.

This course combines reading and intensive writing. Students read carefully selected short stories in order to gain an understanding of the genre and to apply what they learn to their own craft. The focus is on the fundamentals of short fiction writing: structure, plot, voice, point of view, description, and dialogue. Class meetings follow a workshop format, with writing exercises, class discussions, and in-depth critique of students' writing. Prerequisite(s): one 200-level Spanish course above 205. Enrollment limited to 15. F. López.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

SPAN s34. The Practice of Translation in Three Specialty Areas.

The course gives the students the opportunity to practice translating documents pertinent to three specialty areas: medicine, environmental studies, and literature. Students translate documents daily and the translations are revised in class. Students develop new vocabulary, insight into the profession of translating, and familiarity with document formatting. Prerequisite(s): SPAN 211 or an advanced Spanish course. C. Aburto Guzmán.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

INDC s38. Cannibalism as an Eating Disorder in the Conquest of America.

Christopher Columbus coined the word cannibal during his first voyage to the American continent. The word and the concept have been used ever since to situate the Other, people to be conquered or worthy of destruction. This course explores historical texts of the conquest that describe cannibalism and challenge the practice's very existence among Caribs, Aztecs, Incas, and enslaved Africans. Students explore the related concept of the manhunt, the use by the state of modern and ancient technologies of persecution against individuals and groups it has determined to eliminate. All readings are in English. All readings are in English. Cross-listed in African American studies, American cultural studies, Latin American studies, and Spanish. Prerequisite(s): one 200-level Spanish course above SPAN 205. Recommended background: course work in African American studies, American cultural studies, anthropology, history, literature, or women and gender studies.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

SPAN s50. Independent Study.

Students, in consultation with a faculty advisor, individually design and plan a course of study or research not offered in the curriculum. Course work includes a reflective component, evaluation, and completion of an agreed-upon product. Sponsorship by a faculty member in the program/department, a course prospectus, and permission of the chair are required. Students may register for no more than one independent study during a Short Term. Normally offered every year. Staff.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations