background

Courses


Greek

Courses

GRK 101. Elementary Ancient Greek.The objective of the course, the first half of a yearlong sequence, is to begin a study of classical Greek as a foundation for upper-level reading courses. It covers the basics of grammar, syntax, and vocabulary building. Students learn to read Greek sentences and passages and to translate from English into Greek. During the early stage much learning by rote of forms and rules is necessary, but students find that Greek is a structured and beautiful language, and the pleasure of reading "in the original" is inestimable. Normally offered every year. D. O'Higgins, Staff. Concentrations   |   Interdisciplinary Programs.

GRK 102. Elementary Ancient Greek.A continuation of GRK 101, and designed to be taken in the same academic year, this course develops the understanding of Greek syntax. By the end of the year students are competent to read extended passages of classical Greek. Prerequisite(s): GRK 101. Normally offered every year. Staff. Concentrations   |   Interdisciplinary Programs.

GRK 201. Classical Prose.Called the "age of enlightenment," classical Greece witnessed the invention of democracy, philosophy, and medicine, to name but a few. Students read Plato, Thucydides, Demosthenes, or Lysias in order to understand how and why the Greeks created these disciplines and institutions. Prerequisite(s): GRK 101 and 102. Open to first-year students. Staff. Concentrations   |   Interdisciplinary Programs.

GRK 202. Classical Poetry.From Oedipus' self-blinding to the trial of a cheese grater, Athenian tragedies and comedies portray the human condition and the Athenian political world. Students read the works of the comedians, Aristophanes and Menander, and the tragic poets, Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides, who dramatized and satirized the human condition. Prerequisite(s): GRK 101 and 102. Open to first-year students. Staff. Concentrations   |   Interdisciplinary Programs.

GRK 203. Prose about Archaic Greece.As the population exploded in archaic Greece, so did political, social, religious, and cultural institutions. The Persians invaded Greece, the Olympics were inaugurated, tyrants were overthrown, and law courts invented. Students examine these momentous events in archaic authors such as Herodotus and Antiphon or in later writers such as Plutarch and Pausanias. Prerequisite(s): GRK 101 and 102. Open to first-year students. Staff. Concentrations   |   Interdisciplinary Programs.

GRK 204. Poetry from Archaic Greece.Homer sang about Troy's destruction and Odysseus' travels; Hesiod, about the birth of gods and his cheating brother. Sappho praised the power of Aphrodite; Alcaeus, the power of wine. Students explore how the poets in archaic Greece sang about their lives and their world. Prerequisite(s): GRK 101 and 102. Open to first-year students. Staff. Concentrations   |   Interdisciplinary Programs.

GRK 301. Classical Prose: Advanced.This course covers the same material as GRK 201 but is designed for students who have completed two or more years of college-level Greek. Open to first-year students. Staff. Concentrations   |   Interdisciplinary Programs.

GRK 302. Classical Poetry: Advanced.This course covers the same material as GRK 202 but is designed for students who have completed two or more years of college-level Greek. Open to first-year students. Staff. Concentrations   |   Interdisciplinary Programs.

GRK 303. Prose about Archaic Greece: Advanced.This course covers the same material as GRK 203 but is designed for students who have completed two or more years of college-level Greek. Open to first-year students. Staff. Concentrations   |   Interdisciplinary Programs.

GRK 304. Poetry from Archaic Greece: Advanced.This course covers the same material as GRK 204 but is designed for students who have completed two or more years of college-level Greek. Open to first-year students. Staff. Concentrations   |   Interdisciplinary Programs.

GRK 360. Independent Study.Students, in consultation with a faculty advisor, individually design and plan a course of study or research not offered in the curriculum. Course work includes a reflective component, evaluation, and completion of an agreed-upon product. Sponsorship by a faculty member in the program/department, a course prospectus, and permission of the chair are required. Students may register for no more than one independent study per semester. Normally offered every semester. Staff. Interdisciplinary Programs.


Latin

Courses

LATN 101. Elementary Latin I.A humanistic introduction to classical Latin vocabulary, forms, and syntax, with special emphasis on reading the actual words of ancient authors. Relations to English grammar and etymology are stressed. The course concentrates on Latin-English translation, with some English-Latin composition. Latin 101 is not open to students with two or more years of Latin in secondary school. Normally offered every year. M. Imber. Concentrations   |   Interdisciplinary Programs.

LATN 102. Elementary Latin II.A continuation of LATN 101. Normally offered every year. Staff. Concentrations   |   Interdisciplinary Programs.

LATN 201. Introduction to Latin Prose.Introduction to the study of Latin prose from the Republic to the Middle Ages. Prerequisite(s): LATN 101 and 102. Open to first-year students. Staff. Concentrations   |   Interdisciplinary Programs.

LATN 202. Introduction to Latin Poetry.Introduction to the study of Latin Poetry from the Republic to the Middle Ages. Open to first-year students. Staff. Concentrations   |   Interdisciplinary Programs.

LATN 301. Prose of the Empire.The persecution of Christians, the eruption of Mount Vesuvius, and Nero's fiddle are topics of the diverse literature of the Roman Empire. Students read letters, philosophical treatises, histories, and novels from the likes of Tacitus, Seneca, Pliny, and Suetonius. Open to first-year students. Staff. Concentrations   |   Interdisciplinary Programs.

LATN 302. Poetry of the Empire.From Ovid's fables of women turning into trees to Lucan's descriptions of battles and Seneca's drama of Thyestes who feasts on his sons, the tumultuous events of the Roman Empire find strange expression in the poets who could not write openly about the cruelties of their emperors. Students read the works of Ovid, Seneca, Lucan, Statius, and Martial. Open to first-year students. Staff. Concentrations   |   Interdisciplinary Programs.

LATN 303. Republican Prose.The Roman Republic was imagined to be the result of fratricide and rape. Caesar crossed the Rubicon and Cicero's hands and ears were cut off and then hung in the Forum. The course explores the social, political, and religious foundations as well as the violence of the Roman Republic through the eyes of authors such as Livy, Cato, Cicero, Sallust, and Caesar. Open to first-year students. Staff. Concentrations   |   Interdisciplinary Programs.

LATN 304. Republican Poetry.Why do slaves always have the leading roles in Roman comedy? Was Aeneas pious or power-hungry? Did Lesbia really have 300 lovers? The Roman Republic was explained, celebrated, criticized, and ignored in the works of its poets. The course answers why and how through a study of such writers as Plautus, Catullus, Virgil, and Horace. Open to first-year students. Staff. Concentrations   |   Interdisciplinary Programs.

LATN 360. Independent Study.Students, in consultation with a faculty advisor, individually design and plan a course of study or research not offered in the curriculum. Course work includes a reflective component, evaluation, and completion of an agreed-upon product. Sponsorship by a faculty member in the program/department, a course prospectus, and permission of the chair are required. Students may register for no more than one independent study per semester. Normally offered every semester. Staff. Concentrations   |   Interdisciplinary Programs.

LATN 365. Special Topics.Designed for the small seminar group of students who may have particular interests in areas of study that go beyond the regular course offerings. Periodic conferences and papers are required. Instructor permission is required. Interdisciplinary Programs.

Short Term Courses

LATN s30. Medieval Latin.An intensive introduction to reading medieval Latin, from early to late periods in several genres. Prerequisite(s): LATN 102. Enrollment limited to 30. Instructor permission is required. Staff. Concentrations

LATN s50. Independent Study.Students, in consultation with a faculty advisor, individually design and plan a course of study or research not offered in the curriculum. Course work includes a reflective component, evaluation, and completion of an agreed-upon product. Sponsorship by a faculty member in the program/department, a course prospectus, and permission of the chair are required. Students may register for no more than one independent study during a Short Term. Normally offered every year. Staff. Concentrations   |   Interdisciplinary Programs.


  • Contact Us