Justice & Equity Reading Group

The Office of Equity and Diversity (OED) invites members of the Bates College community (students, staff, and faculty) and our neighbors in Lewiston/Auburn to participate in our Justice and Equity Reading Group.

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We in the OED launched the Justice and Equity Reading Group in late-2016 in an effort to galvanize difficult but necessary conversations on issues of social and political import. Each chosen text is short and accessible online at the link below.

If you’re interested in joining our reading group, then simply read the selection(s) listed here in advance of our proposed gathering. Lunch will be provided on a first-come, first-served basis.

We meet from 12 p.m. – 1 p.m. in the Office of Intercultural Education (OIE) on the dates indicated below. We look forward to seeing you soon!

Please direct all inquires and suggestions to Christopher Petrella at cpetrell@bates.edu.

 

FALL 2017

 

WEDNESDAY: 9/13/2017

 “How Homeownership Became the Engine of American Inequality” (2017)

Matthew Desmond considers the historical and contemporary relationship among race, class, homeownership, and economic opportunity in the United States.

WEDNESDAY: 9/27/2017

“Age, Race, Class, and Sex: Women Redefining Difference” (1984)

Audre Lorde explores the ways in which notions of human difference and identity are created, sustained, and challenged through discourses of power and desire.

WEDNESDAY: 10/11/2017

“Still Loving in the (Still) War Years: On Keeping Queer Queer” (2009)

Cherríe Moraga examines the intersection of queerness and freedom in U.S. politics.

WEDNESDAY: 10/25/2017

“Growing up in Maine’s ‘Cancer Valley’” (2017)

Kerri Arsenault reflects on place, identity, and environmental classism in Maine.

WEDNESDAY: 11/8/2017

“Censorship, Not the Painting, Must Go: On Dana Schutz’s Image of Emmett Till” (2017)

Coco Fusco examines the political interworking of race, representation, and censorship.

WEDNESDAY: 11/29/2017

“The Impact of Malcolm X on Asian American Politics and Activism” (1972)

Yuri Kochiyama offers an interview on her relationship with Malcolm X and his influence on Asian American activism.

WEDNESDAY: 12/6/2017

“Google Search: Hyper-visibility as a Means of Rendering Black Women and Girls Invisible” (2013)

Safiya Umoja Noble explores the algorithmic representation of Black women and girls and the digitalization of oppression.

 

WINTER 2017:

 

WEDNESDAY: 1/18/2017

“The Case for Reparations” (2014)

Te-Nehisi Coates examines the history of American blackness from slavery to Jim Crow and beyond and assesses how best the U.S. can pay back its racialized moral debts.

WEDNESDAY 2/1/2017

“How to Tame a Wild Tongue” (1987)

Gloria Anzaldúa offers a powerful reflection on language, ethnicity, and the prospect of social resistance. 

WEDNESDAY: 2/15/2017

“The Deep Roots of ‘White Trash’ in America” (2016)

Kate Tuttle & Nancy Isenberg explore the history of the term “white trash” in the American lexicon.

WEDNESDAY: 3/1/2017

“On Whiteness and the Racial Imaginary” (2015)

Claudia Rankine & Beth Loffreda examine the challenges surrounding writing about race.

WEDNESDAY: 3/15/2017

“Mass Incarceration and its Mystification: A Review of The 13th” (2016)

Dan Berger reviews Ava DuVernay’s The 13th and assesses its interventions and omissions.

WEDNESDAY: 3/29/2017

“Let them Eat Diversity: On the Politics of Identity” (2011)

Walter Benn Michaels explores the fluctuating state of U.S. identity politics and its (possible) promise of social justice.

 

FALL 2016:

 

WEDNESDAY: 11/30/2016

“Diversity is for White People: The big lie behind a well-intended word” (2015)

Ellen Berrey considers the merits and pitfalls of using a “diversity” paradigm for tackling racial inequities in the university and beyond.

WEDNESDAY: 12/14/2016

“Stranger in the Village” (1955)

James Baldwin  philosophically reflects on his experience of being the first and only Black individual to live in a tiny Swiss village.

 

Updated: July 2017