Links

  • This is the official homepage of the Geological Society of America (GSA). It contains updates on GSA Meetings, bookloads of geological information, and other various pieces of information as well. Geological Society of America
  • The United States Government’s own “geology department” is called the United States Geological Survey. Visit it below: United States Geological Survey
  • The American Geophysical Union (AGU) maintains a large Web site featuring information about the organization and its various publications and twice-yearly meetings. Abstracts for the meetings are available on-line as are the contents of recent AGU journals including the Journal of Geophysical Research, Geophysical Research Letters, Reiews of Geophysics, Tectonics, and Geotectonics (a translated Russian journal). American Geophysical Union
  • The Vermont Geological Survey has a homepage, containing information about its operations, projects, history, and other interesting resources. Vermont Geological Survey
  • The United States Geological Survey and the Vermont Geological Survey are working on a cooperative effort mapping project of Vermont. Take a look: Vermont-USGS Cooperative Geologic Mapping Project
  • To see a timeline of the earth’s history, in eras, epochs, and periods, check out this geologic time scale. Geologic Time Scale
  • The World-Wide Earthquake Locator from the Department of Geography at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland. This is a server that takes recent earthquake information from the USGS National Earthquake Information Center and map information from the Xerox PARC map server and displays custom maps showing earthquakes occurring throughout the world during the past week. Earthquake Locations
  • A web site devoted to locations and other information pertaining to the impact sights of meteors. Brought to you by the Geological Survey of Canada. Terrestrial Impact Structures (Craters)
  • Here is the impressive, information-filled geology web page of Cornell University. Take a look at their web site. Cornell University: Department of Geology
  • Check out this Structural Geology web site: Structural Geology