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Courses

Courses

GER 101. Introduction to Language and Culture I.This course, part of a yearlong sequence, introduces students to the German language and its culture context. By emphasizing communicative skill, students learn to speak, build vocabulary, and develop their listening comprehension, reading, and writing skills. GER 101 is offered in the fall semester. GER 101 is not open to students who have had two or more years of German in secondary school. Normally offered every year. C. Decker, R. Cernahoschi, J. Kazecki. Concentrations

GER 102. Introduction to German Language and Culture II.This course, a continuation of GER 101, introduces students to the German Language and its cultural contests. By emphasizing communicative skills, students further develop their speaking listening comprehension, reading, and writing skills. GER 102 is offered in the winter semester. GER 102 is not open to students who have had two or more years of German in secondary school. Normally offered every year. C. Decker, R. Cernahoschi, J. Kazecki. Concentrations

GER 201. Intermediate German I.Offered in the fall, this course is a continuation of GER 101-102, with emphasis on the development of reading strategies and composition skills. Open to first-year students who enter with at least two years of German. Prerequisite(s): GER 102. Open to first-year students. Normally offered every year. R. Cernahoschi, J. Kazecki. Concentrations

GER 202. Intermediate German II.This course, offered in the winter semester, is a continuation of GER 201, with added emphasis on the development of reading strategies and composition skills. Open to first-year students who enter with at least two years of German. Prerequisite(s): GER 102. Normally offered every year. R. Cernahoschi, J. Kazecki. Concentrations

EU/GR 220. Remembering War: The Great War, Memory and Remembrance in Europe.The course focuses on ways in which the experience of the First World War changed established narratives of violence and armed conflict in Central Europe. It further investigates how the new narratives became sites of memory, mourning, and remembrance in the 20th and 21st centuries on the examples of Germany, Poland, Czechoslovakia, and Hungary. New course beginning Fall 2014. Normally offered every other year. J. Kazecki. Concentrations

GER 233. German Composition and Conversation I.A topical course offered in the fall semester and designed to develop linguistic and cultural competency. Through reading and discussing a variety of texts, working with multimedia, and completing writing assignments, students attain greater oral and written proficiency in German while deepening their understanding of the culture of German-speaking countries. Open to first-year students. Normally offered every year. C. Decker, R. Cernahoschi. Concentrations

GER 234. German Composition and Conversation II.A topical course offered in the winter semester and designed to develop linguistic and cultural competency. Through reading and discussing a variety of texts, working with multimedia, and completing writing assignments, students attain greater oral and written proficiency in German while deepening their understanding of the culture of German-speaking countries. Open to first-year students. Normally offered every year. C. Decker, R. Cernahoschi. Concentrations

GER 241. German Modernisms.A study of German and Austrian literature and society from 1890 through 1933, with emphasis on the aesthetic and sociohistorical underpinnings of Naturalism, Impressionism, Expressionism, and selected works of Mann, Kafka, and Brecht. Prerequisite(s): GER 234. Open to first-year students. [W2] C. Decker. Concentrations   |   Interdisciplinary Programs.

GER 244. Staged Marriages.A study of major issues in German dramaturgy from the Enlightenment to the present, explored through texts that dramatize problems relating to marriage. Authors include Lessing, Büchner, Brecht, and Horváth. Prerequisite(s): GER 234. Open to first-year students. [W2] C. Decker. Concentrations   |   Interdisciplinary Programs.

GER 262. The Split Screen: Reconstructing National Identities in West and East German Cinema.This course investigates selected works of West and East German cinematic production after 1945. Students engage a broad range of topics and issues that define the popular view of Germany and its culture today. They discuss Germany's Nazi past, the post-war division of the country and its reunification in 1990, the legacies of the 1968 generation, and the role of minorities in contemporary Germany. The course also provides students with basic tools of film analysis, which are used in the discussion of cinematic art and in the analysis of the specific aesthetic qualities of a film. Conducted in English. J. Kazecki. Concentrations   |   Interdisciplinary Programs.

GER 264. World War I in German Culture.This course explores the ways in which the memory of World War I informed German culture from 1918 to the present, with an emphasis on the literature and film of the Weimar Republic. Topics include the literary representation of the experience of the war, the impact of the war on Weimar cinema, the instrumentalization of the Great War in Nazi ideology and artistic production, as well as strategies of commemoration of World War I in post-1945 German culture. Pre-Prerequisite(s): GER 234 (European.) J. Kazecki. Concentrations   |   Interdisciplinary Programs.

GER 270. Living with the Nazi Legacy.A study of contemporary works from Austria and Germany that articulate the experiences of children of Nazis. Texts, which include autobiographical writings, novels, films, interviews, and essays, are analyzed in terms of their representation of the Nazi past and its continuing impact on the present. Prerequisite(s): GER 234. [W2] C. Decker. Concentrations   |   Interdisciplinary Programs.

GER 350. Margins and Migrations.What is German literature? The course examines this question through the lens of writers who are difficult to incorporate into a national narrative. The first part of the course focuses on literatures produced on the margins of the German and Austrian Empires in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, while the second part studies the effects of postwar labor migrations and globalization on contemporary German, Austrian, and Swiss literatures. Conducted in German. Prerequisite(s): GER 233 or 234. New course beginning Fall 2014. Normally offered every other year. R. Cernahoschi. Concentrations

GER 356. Representing Austrian Fascism.Official state documents and popular historical imagination frequently present Austria as the "first victim of Nazi aggression," thus discounting the active role that Austrians played in the Anschluss and the Third Reich. This course explores the myth of Austria's victimization through analysis of government documents, literary texts, and documentary films that represent Austrian involvement in and response to the Nazi past. Prerequisite(s): one 200-level literature course taught in German. C. Decker. Concentrations   |   Interdisciplinary Programs.

GER 357. Austrian Literature.A study of Austrian fiction that emerges from and responds to three important periods in Austrian political and cultural history: the restorative and revolutionary period of the mid-nineteenth century; fin-de-siècle Vienna and the impending collapse of the Habsburg Empire; and the post–World War II Second Austrian Republic. Prerequisite(s): one 200-level literature course taught in German. C. Decker. Concentrations   |   Interdisciplinary Programs.

GER 358. Literature and Film of the German Democratic Republic. This course explores the ways in which literature and film reflect and refract the social and political experiments of the GDR. Topics include the doctrine of Socialist Realism and its (mis)applications, coming to terms with the past, the emergence and problematization of new gender models, youth culture and generational tensions, the role of the individual in socialist society, censorship and artistic experimentation, conformity and resistance, popular culture and the artistic underground, and industrialization and environmental concerns. Attention is given to the sociohistorical contexts of the examined works and the means and ends of literary and cinematic creations of (alternate) realities. Prerequisite(s): one 200-level literature course taught in German. Recommended background: GER 242. R. Cernahoschi. Concentrations   |   Interdisciplinary Programs.

GER 360. Independent Study.Students, in consultation with a faculty advisor, individually design and plan a course of study or research not offered in the curriculum. Course work includes a reflective component, evaluation, and completion of an agreed-upon product. Sponsorship by a faculty member in the program/department, a course prospectus, and permission of the chair are required. Students may register for no more than one independent study per semester. Normally offered every semester. Staff. Concentrations

GER 365. Special Topics.Designed for the small seminar group of students who may have particular interests in areas of study that go beyond the regular course offerings. Periodic conferences and papers are required. Permission of the department is required. Staff. Concentrations

GER 457. Senior Thesis.Research leading to writing of a senior thesis. Open to senior majors, including honors candidates. Students register for German 457 in the fall semester. Majors writing an honors thesis register for both German 457 and 458. [W3] Normally offered every year. Staff. Concentrations

GER 458. Senior Thesis.Research leading to writing of a senior thesis. Open to senior majors, including honors candidates. Students register for German 458 in the winter semester. Majors writing an honors thesis register for both German 457 and 458. [W3] Normally offered every year. Staff. Concentrations

Short Term Courses

EU/GR s21. Weimar and Berlin: German Culture in European Context.The course traces the sociopolitical transformations that inform Germany's current role in the European Union through the example of two very different capitals: Weimar, the sleepy hamlet turned Germany's premier intellectual center, and Berlin, the once-divided city reinvented as intercultural meeting place. Using selected sites in the two cities, students focus on key moments in German history, which absorbed international trends and, in turn, reverberated across Europe. On campus and in Germany, students learn about important intellectual developments from the Reformation to the presnt day, cultural personalities and artifacts, and the crises and cooperations that produced them. New course beginning Short Term 2014 Enrollment limited to 16. Normally offered every other year. R. Cernahoschi, J. Kazecki. Concentrations

GR/RU s21. Weimar and Berlin: German Culture in European Context.The course traces the sociopolitical transformations that inform Germany's current role in the European Union through the example of two very different capitals: Weimar, the sleepy hamlet turned Germany's premier intellectual center, and Berlin, the once-divided city reinvented as intercultural meeting place. Using selected sites in the two cities, students focus on key moments in German history, which absorbed international trends and, in turn, reverberated across Europe. On campus and in Germany, students learn about important intellectual developments from the Reformation to the present day, cultural personalities and artifacts, and the crises and cooperations that produced them. Course numbered as EU/GR s21 beginning Short Term 2014. Enrollment limited to 16. Instructor permission is required. R. Cernahoschi, J. Kazecki. Concentrations

GER s50. Independent Study.Students, in consultation with a faculty advisor, individually design and plan a course of study or research not offered in the curriculum. Course work includes a reflective component, evaluation, and completion of an agreed-upon product. Sponsorship by a faculty member in the program/department, a course prospectus, and permission of the chair are required. Students may register for no more than one independent study during a Short Term. Normally offered every year. Staff. Concentrations


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