Courses

Courses

RUSS 101. Elementary Russian I.

This course, offered in the fall semester as part of a yearlong sequence, introduces students to Russian language and culture with an emphasis on listening and speaking. Students also experience the richness of modern Russia through a variety of authentic texts including music, art, film, and television. Conducted in Russian. Normally offered every year. D. Browne, M. Loginova.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

RUSS 102. Elementary Russian II.

This course, offered in the winter semester, is a continuation of RUSS 101 with an emphasis on listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students continue their introduction to modern Russia through authentic texts including music, film, and television excerpts, and selected items from recent newspapers and the Internet. Conducted in Russian. Normally offered every year. D. Browne, M. Loginova.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

RUSS 201. Intermediate Russian I.

This course, offered in the fall semester, is a continuation of Elementary Russian, focusing on vocabulary acquisition and greater control of more complex and extended forms of discourse. Conducted in Russian. Prerequisite(s): RUSS 102. Open to first-year students. Normally offered every year. D. Browne, M. Loginova.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

RUSS 202. Intermediate Russian II.

This course, offered in the winter semester, is a continuation of RUSS 201 and completes students' introduction to the formal aspects of Russian language. Emphasis is placed on students' use of Russian to express themselves orally and in writing. Conducted in Russian. Prerequisite(s): RUSS 201. Open to first-year students. Normally offered every year. D. Browne, M. Loginova.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

EU/RU 213. Russian Identities and National Values in Russian Literature.

The present tensions between the United States and Russia have often been described as a clash of civilizations. This course places the contemporary debates into a wider historical context. Students analyze Russian literary texts from nineteenth and twentieth centuries, with some study of much earlier works. Students examine works by Alexander Pushkin, Nickolay Gogol, Fyodor Dostoevsky, and Mikhail Bulgakov, among others, to critically consider Russian national values, the construction of a Russian national identity, and Russia's relationship to the "West." They also study Russian and Soviet films and their representations of these questions. Conducted in English. [W2] M. Loginova.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

ES/RU 216. Nature in the Cultures of Russia.

This course explores the connections among environment, culture, and identity in the Eurasian landmass that has been home to Russians, Siberians, and Central Asians. After a brief consideration of the ways in which Russian identities have been grounded in deeply conservative understandings of land and peasantry, students consider alternative and revisionist versions that draw on "nature" to explore gender, sexuality, and ethnicity, often in direct opposition to the state. Conducted in English. Prerequisite(s): ENVR 205 or one course in European studies or Russian. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 29. J. Costlow.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

INDC 256. Rites of Spring.

Le Sacre du printempsThe Rite of Spring— began as a ballet, with music by Igor Stravinsky, choreography by Vaslav Nijinsky, and sets and costumes by Nicholas Roerich. Premiered in 1913 to riots in Paris, The Rite of Spring has lived on to become one of the most important pieces of music in the Western canon and the zenith of stature and daring for choreographers. This course examines where it came from and how it has evolved over time through dance works, music, and cultural context. Cross-listed in dance, music, and Russian. [W2] Staff.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

RUSS 301. Advanced Russian I.

This course, normally offered in the fall semester, focuses on the essentials of contemporary colloquial Russian. Students read short unabridged texts in both literary and journalistic styles, and write one- and two-page papers on a variety of topics. Conducted in Russian. Prerequisite(s): RUSS 202. Open to first-year students. Normally offered every year. D. Browne, M. Loginova.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

RUSS 302. Advanced Russian II.

This course, normally offered in the winter semester, is a continuation of RUSS 301, in which students read and discuss texts in a variety of styles from political speeches to short novels, from songs to feature-length films. Students write a number of short papers ranging from opinion pieces to literary parodies. Conducted in Russian. Prerequisite(s): RUSS 202. Normally offered every year. D. Browne, M. Loginova.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

RUSS 306. Advanced Russian Culture and Language.

This course develops oral fluency and aural acuity as well as reading and writing skills through directed and spontaneous classroom activities and individual and collaborative written assignments. Conversations and compositions are based on feature films and film criticism, documentary films, and short fiction and nonfiction texts. Conducted in Russian. Prerequisite(s): RUSS 202. Open to first-year students. M. Loginova.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

RUSS 360. Independent Study.

Students, in consultation with a faculty advisor, individually design and plan a course of study or research not offered in the curriculum. Course work includes a reflective component, evaluation, and completion of an agreed-upon product. Sponsorship by a faculty member in the program/department, a course prospectus, and permission of the chair are required. Students may register for no more than one independent study per semester. Normally offered every semester. Staff.

RUSS 365. Special Topics.

Designed for the small seminar group of students who may have particular interests in areas of study that go beyond the regular course offerings. Periodic conferences and papers are required. Conducted in Russian. Instructor permission is required. Staff.

RUSS 401. Contemporary Russian I.

The course is designed to perfect students' ability to understand and speak contemporary, idiomatic Russian. Included are readings from Chekhov, Vysotsky, Okudzhava, Galich. Students also view selected documentary and theatrical performances. Conducted in Russian. Prerequisite(s): Russian 301 or 302. Maybe be repeated with permission of instructor. D. Browne.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

Short Term Courses

RUSS s50. Independent Study.

Students, in consultation with a faculty advisor, individually design and plan a course of study or research not offered in the curriculum. Course work includes a reflective component, evaluation, and completion of an agreed-upon product. Sponsorship by a faculty member in the program/department, a course prospectus, and permission of the chair are required. Students may register for no more than one independent study during a Short Term. Normally offered every semester. Staff.