Posts from September 2006
2006 Orientation

Monday, September 25, 2006 12:00 am

Orientation for the Class of 2010, held Aug. 28-Sept. 8, included a little something for everyone.

Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Mary Oliver to read at Bates

Thursday, September 21, 2006 12:00 am

Poet Mary Oliver, whose writing has won the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award, visits Bates College to read from her work at 7:30 p.m. Monday, Sept. 25, in the Olin Arts Center Concert Hall, 75 Russell St.

Timothy McCall '08 researches Lewiston's Jewish community

Tuesday, September 19, 2006 3:26 pm

A visit to the local Jewish cemetery taught Timothy McCall '08 of Lawrenceville, N.J., a timeless lesson in history.

Bates students, alumni net at least six top fellowships

Friday, September 15, 2006 4:00 pm

In the 2005-06 academic season, at least six Bates students and alumni have received prestigious graduate fellowships. Most worked with the Bates Graduate Fellowship and Watson Committees to prepare their applications.

Byzantine-studies symposium features up-and-coming scholars

Wednesday, September 13, 2006 12:00 am

Four recent Ph.D. recipients present a variety of research at a Bates symposium titled "Byzantine Studies: Back to the Future," to be held from 1:30 to 5:30 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 16, in the Keck Classroom (G52), Pettengill Hall, Andrews Road.

Food historian to discuss rise of Creole cultures in African Diaspora

Tuesday, September 12, 2006 12:00 am

Food historian and cookbook author Jessica B. Harris, professor of special programs and associate professor of English at Queens College, City University of New York, will give a talk titled "The Rise of Creole Cultures in the African Diaspora" at 4 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 14, in the Edmund S. Muskie Archives, 70 Campus Ave., Bates College. The public is invited to attend the lecture, sponsored by the Office of Multicultural Affairs, at no charge. For more information, please call the Multicultural Center at 207-786-8376.

Class of 2010 at a glance

Thursday, September 7, 2006 11:28 am

Bates welcomed 494 new first-year students and 17 transfer students as the fall semester started on Sept. 6. The college received 4,482 applications, second only to last year. According to the Office of Admissions, 87 percent graduated in the top fifth of their high school class. More than 10 percent are U.S. students from underrepresented minority groups, 5 percent are international students and 4 percent hold citizenships in both the United States and another country. First-generation-to-college students make up 8 percent of the entering class. New students have residences in 33 states and 32 foreign countries, from Bangladesh to Vietnam. Almost 80 percent of the new enrolled students had an admissions interview, either on campus or through the Alumni-In-Admissions network. Some 1,717 students are expected on campus this fall, with another 155 in Bates-sponsored programs off-campus.

Poet Farnsworth inaugurates new convocation tradition

Thursday, September 7, 2006 12:00 am

Convocation is about the new, and novelty abounded at the 2006 Bates College convocation. Of course, the ceremony always opens a new academic year — this is the 152nd — and welcomes new students, some 500 of them this time around. Yet this year's convocation, held Sept. 6, also included the public debut of the College's new chaplain, Rev. William Blaine-Wallace, and marked the start of an important tradition. Where Bates for years has invited outside speakers to give the convocation address, that honor this time went to a faculty member, the poet and English professor Rob Farnsworth.

Audio slideshow: Bates production sharpened the edge on Elton play

Wednesday, September 6, 2006 12:00 am

Ben Elton's 1996 play Popcorn is a bleak comedy about the symbiotic relationship between violence and the mass media. It's the story of an American film director, known for the sensationalistic violence in his work, who is taken hostage by two serial killers on the very evening he wins an Oscar. The so-called Mall Murderers, Wayne and Scout, claim that director Bruce Delamitri inspired their brutal acts and should therefore be held responsible for them.

Robert Farnsworth's reading of a Tagliabue poem

Tuesday, September 5, 2006 9:41 am

At the September 2006 faculty meeting, English faculty member Rob Farnsworth, who spent the summer as the poet-in-residence at The Frost Place, a museum and arts center housed in poet Robert Frost's former homestead in Franconia, N.H., read a poem of his own in memory of John Tagliabue as well as this poem of Tagliabue's, "Sliding into the Future."

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