Campus events (illustrated edition): Nov. 1–30, 2018

A critically acclaimed jazz trio, The Bad Plus performs at Bates on Nov. 13. From left: Reid Anderson (bass), Dave King (drums) and Orrin Evans (piano).

Hello from Bates!

This is a listing of public events at the college during November 2018.

Updates to this edition: The end date for Amy Stacey Curtis’s exhibition at the art museum has been moved to March 23, 2019.

The public is invited to these events. Except as noted, admission is free.

Need directions? Here’s a campus map.

Want the latest events information? Visit the daily Events page.

Can’t attend the game? Watch the livestream:

  • Go to gobatesbobcats.com
  • Hover over the “Media” tab
  • Click the “Livestreams” link and look for your event. (Not all games are livestreamed.)

Questions or comments? Contact events editor Doug Hubley at calendar@bates.edu.


Women’s basketball opens at home on Nov. 20 as Bates welcomes the University of Southern Maine. This 2017 image shows the spirited sophomore guard Julia Middlebrook of Ridgefield, Conn., in action against Colby. (Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College)

Recurring Events

Taking place while Bates is in session. Please confirm before you go.

4:15pm daily | Dharma Society sit: A 20-minute group meditation. Wednesday–Sunday, meditation is silent. Beginners are welcome and orientations provided. FMI abrownel@bates.edu.
Gomes Chapel

12:15pm Mon | Monday Meditation: Start your week well with a 20-minute meditation facilitated by the Multifaith Chaplaincy. Beginners welcome. FMI 207-786-8272.
Gomes Chapel

6:30pm Mon | Zen meditation led by Associated Buddhist Chaplain Jaime McLeod. Cushions provided, beginners welcome. FMI jaime@treetopzencenter.org.
Gomes Chapel

6pm Wed | Life drawing with the Museum of Art. Dry-media easels and drawing benches provided, bring drawing board and supplies. $10/$9 museum members; $90/$80 for pre-purchased 10-session tickets. FMI 207-786-8302.
Olin 259


1 Thu

4:15pm | Housing Matters: Challenges to Housing Security for Low-Income Families: The Theory Into Practice Series presents panelists Patricia Ender of Pine Tree Legal Assistance, a pro bono legal aid organization; Amy Smith of Healthy Homeworks, a nonprofit that brings landlords and tenants together to alleviate unhealthy housing conditions; and Maine Rep. Bettyann Sheats (D-Auburn). Sponsored by the Harward Center for Community Partnerships. FMI mrotundo@bates.edu
Pettengill G52

Dr. Edward E. Curtis is Millennium Chair of Liberal Arts and professor of religious studies at the Indiana University School of Liberal Arts.

5pm | Paywall: The Business of Scholarship: Director Jason Schmitt’s documentary explores open access to research and science, questions the $25 billion a year taken in by for-profit academic publishers and examines the more-than 35% profit margin associated with academic publisher Elsevier. Q&A follows the screening. Sponsored by Information & Library Services. FMI kwilfong@bates.edu.
Olin 105

7pm | The Long History of Muslims in the United States: Muslim Contributions to American Culture: A talk by Edward Curtis, author of 10 books about the role of Islam and Muslims in U.S. history and contemporary affairs, and professor of religious studies at Indiana University. Free but RSVP required: Eventbrite. The annual Andrews Lecture honors Bertha May Bell Andrews, who established the physical education program for women at Bates and who believed that education without morality is useless. FMI 207-786-8272.
Muskie Archives

7:30pm | Eurydice: When Eurydice dies, the heartbroken Orpheus follows her to Hades and persuades the powers-that-be to return her to life — on one condition. The New York Times called Sarah Ruhl’s 2003 stage adaptation of the myth an “inexpressibly moving theatrical fable about love, loss and the pain of memory.” Dana Professor of Theater Martin Andrucki directs this innovative production. Free, but tickets required: bit.ly/bates-theater-dance. $5 donations gratefully accepted. FMI 207-786-6161.
Schaeffer Theatre


2 Fri

7pm | Step Up: Anne Fletcher’s film is the story of a young man who gets the opportunity of a lifetime: After vandalizing a performing arts school, he gains the chance to earn a scholarship and dance with an up-and-coming dancer. Sponsored by the Filmboard and the Dance Club. (2006, 104 min.) FMI dunterbe@bates.edu.
Olin 104

7:30pm | Eurydice (see Nov. 1).
Schaeffer Theatre


Hiroya Miura, associate professor of music, leads the Bates Orchestra in concert Nov. 3. (Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College)

3 Sat

2pm | Tournées Film Festival: 120 Battements par Minute (“BPM”). Writer-director Robin Campillo draws from his own experience as a member of Act Up–Paris to tell a fictionalized history of the activist group. In the early days of the HIV/AIDS outbreaks, Act Up sought to bring recognition and improved treatment to victims of the epidemic. “BPM” combines social justice in a time of fear and stigmatization with a heart-breaking love story. Q&A follows the movie. (2017, 143 min.) FMI lballadu@bates.edu.
Olin 104

5pm | Eurydice (see Nov. 1).
Schaeffer Theatre

7:30pm | Bates Orchestra plays Beethoven, Schumann: Hiroya Miura leads the orchestra in a program featuring two works by Beethoven — the Overture to Egmont and Symphony No. 3 in E-flat major (“Eroica”) — and one by Schumann, the Piano Concerto in A minor, featuring Chiharu Naruse of the Bates applied music faculty. Free but tickets required: batesconcerts.eventbrite.com. FMI 207-786-6135 or olinarts@bates.edu.
Olin Concert Hall

9:30pm | Astral Pines: The Bates Arts Society presents the Portland, Maine-based psychedelic-rock group. FMI jshea@bates.edu.
Chase Hall, Little Room


Martin Andrucki directs the November 2018 production of Eurydice. (Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College)

4 Sun

2pm | Eurydice (see Nov. 1).
Schaeffer Theatre

7pm | El Silencio de Neto: Film director Luis Argueta will introduce his award-winning film, the politically charged story of a young boy striving to follow his dreams while his country struggles to preserve democracy amidst CIA cold-war propaganda. Discussion follows the screening. (1994, 108 min.) FMI habdi@bates.edu.
Olin 104


A scene from “Petit à petit” (“Little by Little”).

5 Mon

2pm | Tournées Film Festival: Petit à Petit (“Little by Little”). Director Jean Rouche’s subversive commentary on colonialism and capitalism is a warmhearted comedy about three men on a mission to build the first residential tower in their hometown of Niamey, Niger. Their quest leads to Paris where two of the men encounter the lavishness and absurdities of Western lifestyle as they explore the experiences that cross-cultural exchange has to offer. Q&A follows the movie. (1970, 96 min.) FMI lballadu@bates.edu.
Olin 104

7:30pm | Eurydice (see Nov. 1).
Schaeffer Theatre


Co-directors Agnes Varda and JR in a scene from Visages, Villages.

7 Wed

4:15pm | Remixing the Past: Fan Fiction and Female Agency in Greek Tragedy. A talk by Amy Pistone, visiting assistant professor of classics at Notre Dame University. Presented by the Program in Classical and Medieval Studies. FMI dbegin@bates.edu.
Pettengill G52

6:30pm | Multifaith Banquet: This festive dinner celebrates the religious and spiritual diversity of Bates College. This year’s theme is “The Art of Being,” and students will share stories of finding and honing their “craft” — something they are passionate about and devoted to. Their stories will be accompanied by musical offerings and blessings from Bates Spiritual Advisors. Free but RSVP required. FMI 207-786-8272.
Chase Hall, Memorial Commons

7pm | Tournées Film Festival: Visages Villages (“Faces, Places”). In critically acclaimed director Agnès Varda’s documentary, she joins forces with famous street artist JR to search the French countryside for subjects for JR’s portraits. The journey assembles an image of France focusing on ordinary individuals, and Varda’s friendship with JR and her memories of a life well-lived create a documentary worth celebrating. Nominated for an Academy Award for the Best Documentary of 2017. A closing reception for the film festival starts at 6:30pm and a Q&A follows the movie. (2017, 94 min.) FMI lballadu@bates.edu.
Olin 104

9pm | {pause}: The Multifaith Chaplaincy offers a deeply reflective, secular half-hour of silence, poetry, music, dance and art. FMI 207-786-8272.
Gomes Chapel


A scene from Ai Weiwei’s documentary Human Flow.

8 Thu

11:45am | Public Works in Progress: Bates students share their summertime experiences, sponsored by the Harward Center for Community Partnerships, working with diverse organizations in the nonprofit and governmental sectors. FMI 207-786-8273 or mdeschai@bates.edu.
Commons 221–222

4:15pm | Freedom and Structural Domination: Two Views. A lecture on housing, gentrification and republican freedom by Rafeeq Hasan, an assistant professor of philosophy at Amherst College who focuses on the social dimensions of freedom. FMI dbegin@bates.edu.
Hedge 208

7:30pm | Human Flow: This documentary is director-artist Ai Weiwei’s detailed and heartbreaking exploration of the global refugee crisis, conducted over the course of a year as Weiwei follows a chain of urgent human stories that stretch across the globe, including Afghanistan, France, Greece, Germany and Iraq. Presented in conjunction with the Bates College Museum of Art exhibition Anthropocenic. (2017, 140 min.) FMI museum@bates.edu or 207-786-6158.
Olin 105


Dana Hartshorn ’19 performs with the contradance band Catastrophe. (Lucy Schultz Photography)

9 Fri

7pm | Ballroom Swing and Rumba Dance Social: Hosted by the Bates Ballroom Team, this swing and rumba dance social begins with a brief lesson from 7–8pm (no experience necessary) and continues with fun tunes and a few refreshments. FMI kcleary@bates.edu.
Benjamin Mays Center

8pm | Contradance: In this month’s Freewill Folk Society contradance, the trio Catastrophe — Ness Smith-Savedoff on electric drums, Kyra Bleicher ’19 on fiddle and Dana Hartshorn ’19 on keyboard — provides a groovy contemporary take on traditional folk. Calling by Dela Taylor. All dances are taught and beginners are wildly encouraged to join the fun, no experience necessary. Beginner lesson at 7:45pm, dance from 8–10:45pm. Suggested donation $5–8 (free for Bates students). FMI freewillfolk@gmail.com.
Muskie Archives


10 Sat

Noon | Football vs. Hamilton.
Garcelon Field


11 Sun

6:45pm | Restrepo: Screening and discussion. Directed by Sebastian Junger and the late Tim Hetherington, this Sundance award-winning documentary follows the experiences of an Army unit in Afghanistan. Following a screening of the film, this Veterans Day event presents a panel discussion of combat — its nature and consequences. All veterans, the panelists are Chris Beam, a former lecturer in history at Bates and director of the Muskie Archives (USMC); state Rep. Jared Golden ’11 (USMC); and G. Lamar Stewart Sr., a minister and police officer in Philadelphia (U.S. Army). Free but tickets required: restrepo-bates.eventbrite.com. (2010, 93 min.)
Olin Concert Hall


12 Mon

4:15pm | Talk by Amy Hollywood: The Elizabeth H. Monrad Professor of Christian Studies at Harvard Divinity School, Hollywood addresses a topic TBA in this event sponsored by the religious studies department. FMI jbelive2@bates.edu.
Pettengill G65

6pm | Environmental Degradation & Histories of Colonialism: Presented in conjunction with the Bates College Museum of Art exhibition Anthropocenic, this discussion features participating artists Sammy Baloji and Maika’i Tubbs; and Bates faculty Leslie Hill, associate professor of politics and of gender and sexuality studies, and Patrick Otim, assistant professor of history. A reception in the museum follows. FMI 207-786-6158 or museum@bates.edu.
Olin 104

8pm | Museum reception: This reception in the college museum follows a panel discussion (see above) related to the exhibition Anthropocenic. FMI 207-786-6158 or museum@bates.edu.
Museum of Art


13 Tue

7:30pm | The Bad Plus: The Olin Concert Series presents a piano trio famed for its relentless search for rules to break and boundaries to cross. The Bad Plus bridges genres and techniques in its exploration of the possibilities of exceptional musicians in perfect sync. $25, available at batesconcerts.eventbrite.com. FMI olinarts@bates.edu or 207-786-6135.
Olin Concert Hall


Maho Ishiguro, an expert in Indonesian dance and a doctoral candidate in ethnomusicology at Yale, performs with Darsono and the Bates Gamelan Ensemble last December. (Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College)

14 Wed

Noon | Justice & Equity Reading Group: Sponsored by the Office of Equity and Diversity, this is a space for community conversations about topics relevant to social justice. Lunch is provided and the short readings are accessible online. FMI bates.edu/diversity-inclusion/readinggroup/.
Chase Hall, Office of Intercultural Education

7:30pm | Bates Gamelan Ensemble with guest artists: A signature attraction at Bates, the gamelan ensemble is joined by Indonesian musician Darsono and dancer Maho Ishiguro in performing a traditional Central Javanese set. Admission is free, but seating is limited and tickets required: batesconcerts.eventbrite.com. FMI 207-786-6135 or olinarts@bates.edu.
Benjamin Mays Center

7:30pm | Dance performance by Johanna Hayes: Hayes, of Edwards, Colo., offers a performance in connection with her thesis in dance. Free, but tickets required: bit.ly/bates-theater-dance. $5 donations gratefully accepted. FMI 207-786-6161.
Gannett Theater (Schaeffer Theatre ground floor)

9pm | {pause} (see Nov. 7).
Gomes Chapel


A scene shot in Sudbury, Ontario, from the documentary Manufactured Landscapes.

15 Thu

7pm | Manufactured Landscapes: Bates’ Otis Lecturer in 2015, Jennifer Baichwal directed this documentary about renowned photographer Edward Burtynsky, whose large-scale images of “manufactured landscapes” — quarries, recycling yards, factories, mines, dams — raise challenging questions about ethics and aesthetics. The film follows Burtynsky to China as he captures the evidence and effects of that country’s massive industrial revolution. Presented in conjunction with the Museum of Art exhibition Anthropocenic. (2006, 86 min.) FMI 207-786-6158 or museum@bates.edu.
Olin 105

7:30pm | Dance performance by Johanna Hayes (see Nov. 14).
Gannett Theater (Schaeffer Theatre ground floor)


16 Fri

3:30pm | Family Printmaking Workshop: The Bates College Museum of Art hosts this workshop for ages 5-plus. Participants will learn about block printing through examples from the museum collection, and will learn to handle printmaking tools, carve or cut their own design into a block and make prints from the block. $5 per person. Space is limited, registration required. To register or FMI: 207-786-8212.
Benjamin Mays Center


17 Sat–25 Sun

Thanksgiving Recess: No classes. Administrative offices are open through Nov. 21.


Men’s basketball opens at home against Brandeis on Nov. 17. This scene from last year’s opener shows Eli Frater ’19 of Brooklyn, N.Y., who scored a career-high 17 points in Bates’ 107-103 victory over the University of New England on Nov. 26, 2017. (Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College)

17 Sat

3pm | Men’s basketball vs. Brandeis.
Alumni Gym


20 Tue

5:30pm | Women’s basketball vs. Southern Maine.
Alumni Gym

7:30pm | Men’s basketball vs. Southern Maine.
Alumni Gym


25 Sun

3pm | Women’s basketball vs. University of New England.
Alumni Gym


26 Mon

Noon | EnviroLunch: One in a series of presentations (topic TBA) on issues relating to sustainability and the environment. Sponsored by the environmental studies program. FMI 207-786-6464 or cparrish@bates.edu.
Commons 221

4:15pm | Can Africa Feed Africa? A talk by Joanne Gaskell, an agricultural economist from the World Bank in Washington, D.C. Presented by the economics department. FMI dbegin@bates.edu.
Pettengill G21


27 Tue

4:15pm | Evidence for a Keynesian Hypothesis: Nominal Wage Rigidity and Job Destruction. A talk by Seth Murray of the Department of Economics at the University of Maryland. Presented by the economics department. FMI dbegin@bates.edu.
Pettengill G21

7pm | Women’s basketball vs. Maine–Farmington.
Alumni Gym


28 Wed

Noon | Justice & Equity Reading Group (see Nov. 14).
Chase Hall, Office of Intercultural Education

6pm | Men’s & women’s squash vs. Bowdoin.
Bates Squash Center, 56 Alfred Plourde Parkway

9pm | {pause} (see Nov. 7).
Gomes Chapel


Visiting poet at Bates this academic year, Myronn Hardy reads from his work in a Literary Arts Live event on Nov. 29.

29 Thu

7pm | Human Flow (see Nov. 8).
Olin 105

7:30pm | Myronn Hardy, poet: Literary Arts Live presents a reading by the 2018–19 visiting poet at Bates. The author of four collections, Hardy writes “the most effective kind of witness poetry; the kind that doesn’t preach and is much more emotionally affecting for simply presenting the reader with a concrete image.” — Rattle.com. Followed by book sales and signing. FMI 207-753-6963.
Muskie Archives


“20 Hours” (2010) is a work in graphite and charcoal by Amy Stacey Curtis.

Museum of Art

bates.edu/museum

museum@bates.edu

Through March 23

Amy Stacey Curtis: Time and Place: Curtis is recognized for her ambitious and interactive sculpture installations, notably an 18-year project in which nine “solo-biennials” were composed of 81 installation and new-media works. This show, however, focuses on drawings by Curtis, which illustrate her fascination with themes of order, chaos and repetition. No less impressive than her large-scale installations, these graphic works provide a more intimate and personal approach to her continued examination of interconnectedness.

Anthropocenic: Art About the Natural World in the Human Era: Scientists are thinking about how the Holocene, the geological period that began after the end of the last ice age around 12,000 years ago, has perhaps been replaced by the Anthropocene — an epoch named for humans and defined as one in which our impact on the world has been so acute that it is in the geologic evidence. Anthropocenic is a topical and compelling group exhibition by artists who — embracing widely varied conceptual strategies, artistic practices and media — make art about the natural world and our effects on and interrelation with it in the 21st century.

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