background
Published on Description

Thursday

March 19, 2009
4:31 pm

Eric Peters '86 raises oysters for the raw bar

In season, Peters and a part-time employee hand-harvest up to 8,000 shellfish weekly from the riverbed acreage that Peters leases from the state. Currently wholesaling through a distributor to restaurants in Boston and elsewhere, Peters will begin retailing in 2009 as Norumbega Oyster Inc. to diversify his clientele and boost revenues.

Friday

February 27, 2009
3:09 pm

Bates students to take part in D.C. energy demonstration

Fifty Bates College students are among an estimated 10,000 young people from around the United States who will gather in the nation’s capital on Feb. 27 for a four-day summit supporting immediate action on climate, energy and economic issues.

Wednesday

January 7, 2009
12:40 pm

Bates alums producing sustainable food

The College’s 2008–09 initiative Bates Contemplates Food got cover treatment in the recent Bates Magazine with “The Maine Course,” a…

Tuesday

January 6, 2009
11:03 am

Alan Hunt '03 brings synergy to food policy

“You need to look at the whole food system” instead of the input-output view that typifies much of U.S. agriculture, says Alan Hunt ’03, an agricultural policy analyst at the Northeast Midwest Institute.

Monday

October 20, 2008
11:40 am

Science historian discusses views of climate change

Historian of science at the University of California, San Diego, Naomi Oreskes gave a lecture on the science of climate change and the notion of scientific consensus. (Total length: 1:16:12)

Wednesday

October 8, 2008
9:00 pm

UChicago professor celebrates Darwin at Bates

“What advice would you give to Maine students interested in science?”

Monday

July 7, 2008
12:00 pm

Economist Lynne Lewis measures dams' effects on property values

Recent research by Bates environmental economist Lynne Lewis shows the benefits of removing a hydropower dam on Maine’s Kennebec River 10 years ago.

Saturday

March 1, 2008
4:39 pm

Of Climate, Clams, and Colleagues

Arctic clams are sentinels of climate change, says biology professor Will Ambrose. But he didn’t find that out by himself