Archives for "Beverly Johnson"
horiz-BMMC_Short_Ridge_0014 copy
Slideshow: Beach morning, marsh afternoon, and starry night for these geology students

Friday, August 28, 2015 12:00 pm

From beach to marsh, geology students did faculty-guided thesis fieldwork in and around the Bates–Morse Mountain Conservation Area, with time for play, too.

Students and faculty, including geology professor Bev Johnson, install research equipment on the Sprague Marsh at Bates-Morse Mountain on April 22, 2014. (Sarah Crosby/Bates College)
Video: Visiting the Sprague Marsh to measure sea level change

Friday, May 2, 2014 9:00 am

Geology faculty and students head to Bates-Morse Mountain to place measurement rods deep in the marsh.

Bates environmental economist Lynne Lewis, associate professor of economics, poses on the Auburn banks of the Androscoggin River behind The Hilton Garden Inn Auburn Riverwatch. Photograph by Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College.
Bates team featured in New England Emmy-nominated MPBN documentary

Monday, May 7, 2012 2:03 pm

"Desperate Alewives," a Maine Public Broadcasting Network documentary featuring Bates environmental economist Lynne Lewis among others, has been nominated for a New England Emmy.

Of Climate, Clams, and Colleagues

Saturday, March 1, 2008 4:39 pm

Arctic clams are sentinels of climate change, says biology professor Will Ambrose. But he didn’t find that out by himself

Australian research suggests human potential to change environment

Monday, August 8, 2005 10:59 am

Why did one species disappear while the other survived? The simple answer is diet. Genyornis couldn't adapt to radical changes in the available food supply, while the emu could, according to a geological study published in the July 8 issue of Science magazine and co-authored by Bates geochemist Beverly Johnson.

Grant will advance research into climate change, ancient Mainers

Thursday, December 19, 2002 3:04 pm

Bates College has received a state grant of nearly $170,000 for analytical equipment that will significantly advance studies of climate change, the coastal environment and the ecological impact of Maine's ancient inhabitants.