Curriculum

The Biology major curriculum provides a broad exposure to all levels of biological organization through core (required of all biology majors) classes and a diverse offering of electives and research-oriented coursework. AY 2019-20 marks a year of curricular transition for our incoming class of 2023 as we institute a new core curriculum. Catalog description of the biology requirements for the class of 2023

[Majors through class of 2022) The Biology major core courses begin with Bio 190, followed in the fall of the sophomore year by Bio 242 (Cell and Molecular Biology) and in Winter term, Bio 270 (Ecology and Evolution). Advanced training occurs in a variety of elective courses at the 200-300 level and research-intensive offerings, including Seminar and Research classes and thesis.

NOTE: Students who have completed Bio 190, Bio 242, and Bio 270 cannot receive credit for Bio 202, Bio 204, or Bio 206. If you are a biology major of sophomore or higher standing as of January 2020, and will not complete Bio 190, 242, and 270 by the end of Winter 2020, you will need to contact Don Dearborn about completing your core requirements.

[Beginning with the class of 2023] Incoming first year students in fall 2019 have a variety of topical Bio 195x CURE courses (Course-based Undergraduate Research Experiences) biology from which to choose as their entry point to the major. Three additional 200-level core courses currently under development: 1) Cellular Bases of Life; 2) Evolution and Interactions of Life; and 3) Biological Research Experience: Molecules to Ecosystems will complete the new core biology requirements and will be taught beginning in Fall 2020. These 200-level courses have prerequisites. Advanced training occurs in a variety of elective courses at the 200-300 level and research-intensive offerings, including Seminar and Research classes and thesis.

The Biology curriculum supports student training with and use of modern biotechnology and instrumentation including PCR, qPCR, electrophoresis, and other molecular techniques, fluorescence microscopy, analytical electron microscopy, and digital acquisition of data and images. A recent grant brought  a new laser scanning confocal microscope to Bates which will greatly expand research and teaching opportunities for cell and molecular biology, neuroscience, and physics.

Animal physiology (Bio 337) students conducting an experiment to measure the effect of temperature on the metabolic rate of mice.r

Animal physiology (Bio 337) students conducting an experiment to measure the effect of temperature on the metabolic rate of mice.

Bio270-winter-2014

Ecology and Evolution (Bio 270) class on a field trip to the Maine coast.