German and Russian Studies

Associate Professors Browne, Cernahoschi, and Kazecki; Visiting Assistant Professor Hamilton; Lecturer Loginova



Contemporary central and eastern Europe consists of heterogeneous societies with contested cultural traditions. Offerings in the Department of German and Russian Studies investigate important interconnections among history, society, culture, and language in the region. The curricula in German and Russian explore societies challenged and invigorated by change and stress the importance of attaining fluency not only in the language but also in the nuances of cultural understanding.

The department offers a major and a minor in German and a minor in Russian. The department also contributes to the interdisciplinary Program in European Studies. More information on the Department of German and Russian Studies is available on the website (www.bates.edu/german-russian).

All students, and especially majors and minors, are strongly encouraged to spend an extended period of time abroad prior to graduation. Opportunities to do so include participation in the Bates Fall Semester Abroad programs in Germany and Russia; junior-year- or junior-semester-abroad programs; summer sessions; and the various off-campus Short Term courses sponsored by the department.

Entering students are assigned to the appropriate level in language courses according to the following criteria: their performance on the SAT II or Advanced Placement Test of the College Entrance Examination Board taken in secondary school, relative proficiency based on length of previous study, and/or after consultation with an appropriate member of the department. Incoming students with previous knowledge of German should complete the German Language Placement Questionnaire on the departmental website (https://www.bates.edu/german-russian/academics/german/language-placement/) to determine the appropriate German course to take.

Literatures and Cultures in Translation

While the department emphasizes the importance of acquiring the fluency needed to study literature and culture in the original, the German and Russian and affiliated faculty offer many courses in translation. See course listings in German, Russian, and European studies the relevant departments and programs for detailed descriptions of these courses.

ES/RU 216. Nature in the Cultures of Russia.
EUS 215. Jewish Lives in Eastern Europe: History, Memory, Story.
EUS 240. Daily Life under Hitler and Stalin.
EUS 261. Slavic Europe.
EUS 300. Sport in Europe.
EUS s24. Slavic Europe.
EUS s26. Russian and East European Film.
EU/GR 254. Berlin and Vienna, 1900-1914.
EU/HI 288. Modern Russia: From Revolution to Today.
EU/HI 301L. Nazi Germany and the Holocaust.
EU/RU 213. Russian Identities and National Values in Russian Literature.
GER s26. The Split Screen: Reconstructing National Identities in West and East German Cinema.

German

Major Requirements in German

The major consists of ten courses in the German program. Required are: GER 233, at least one 300-level seminar, and GER 457 or GER 458. German majors must take a course in German both semesters of their senior year.

Students starting the major with GER 101 typically take the sequence GER 101, GER 102, GER 201, GER 202, and GER 233, before taking upper-level seminars. Students who have started their major with GER 101 and are studying abroad in a German-speaking country during the fall of their junior year may substitute an appropriate course taken abroad for GER 233.

The major may include one elective in English from among the courses taught by the German faculty at Bates. Courses on German and European history and culture, as well as courses relevant to German studies offered in other departments or programs may be counted toward the major with the approval of the faculty advisor. Students may petition to have up to three electives in English counted toward the major in some circumstances.

Minor in German

A minor requires a minimum of seven courses in the German program. At least six of the seven courses must be taught in German. At least one of the seven courses must focus on the study of literature or culture (taught either in German or in English). Advanced Placement courses may not be applied toward the minor.

Pass/Fail Grading Option for the Classes of 2021, 2022, and 2023

Pass/fail grading may not be elected for courses applied toward the major except for 201, 202, and/or 233; nor for the minor except for 101, 102, 201, 202, and/or 233.

Pass/Fail Grading Option for the Classes of 2024 and beyond

The use of the pass/fail option is restricted to one course within the major and the minor but may not be elected for 300-level courses.

Study Abroad

German majors and minors are strongly encouraged to deepen their engagement with German language and culture through the experience of studying in a German-speaking country. The completion of four college-level German courses is typically required before commencing a study-abroad program in German. Majors normally receive a maximum of three credits for one semester of study and five credits for two semesters of study in a recognized program. Minors normally receive a maximum of two credits for one semester of study and three credits for two semesters. Students are encouraged to speak with their faculty advisor regarding course offerings before going abroad, otherwise credit toward the major or minor is not guaranteed. More information is available on the Russian and German Studies departmental website
(https://www.bates.edu/german-russian/study-abroad/).

Courses
GER 101. Introduction to German Language and Culture I.
This course, part of a yearlong sequence, introduces students to the German language and its cultural contexts. By emphasizing communicative skills, students learn to speak, build vocabulary, and develop their listening comprehension, reading, and writing skills. GER 101 is only offered in the fall semester. GER 101 is not open to students who have had two or more years of German in secondary school. Enrollment limited to 29. Normally offered every year. [AC] [CP] R. Cernahoschi, J. Kazecki.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

GER 102. Introduction to German Language and Culture II.
This course, a continuation of GER 101, introduces students to the German language and its cultural contexts. By emphasizing communicative skills, students further develop their speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing skills. GER 102 is only offered in the winter semester. GER 102 is not open to students who have had two or more years of German in secondary school. Prerequisite(s): GER 101. Enrollment limited to 29. Normally offered every year. [AC] [CP] R. Cernahoschi, A. Hamilton, J. Kazecki.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

GER 201. Intermediate German Language and Culture I.
Offered in the fall, this course is a continuation of GER 101-102. Students further expand their skills through sustained interactive practice in reading, writing, listening and speaking, as well as their cultural knowledge about the German-speaking countries through wide-ranging, authentic material. Open to first-year students who enter with at least two years of German. Prerequisite(s): GER 102. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 29. Normally offered every year. [AC] [CP] R. Cernahoschi, A. Hamilton, J. Kazecki.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

GER 202. Intermediate German Language and Culture II.
This course, offered in the winter semester, is a continuation of GER 201. Students further expand their skills through sustained interactive practice in reading, writing, listening and speaking, as well as their cultural knowledge about the German-speaking countries through wide-ranging, authentic material. Open to first-year students who enter with at least two years of German. Prerequisite(s): GER 201. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 29. Normally offered every year. [AC] [CP] R. Cernahoschi, J. Kazecki.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

GER 233. Advanced German Language and Introduction to German Studies.
A topical course offered in the fall semester and designed to develop linguistic and cultural competency at the advanced level, as well as to introduce students to some of the analytical and interpretative strategies necessary to engage and decode the breadth and variety of cultural productions originating in the German-speaking world. The course focuses on analysis and critical thinking applied to a variety of written and audiovisual media. Prerequisite(s): GER 202. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 29. Normally offered every year. [CP] [HS] R. Cernahoschi, A. Hamilton, J. Kazecki.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

GER 251. The Age of Revolution: The German Enlightenment, Classicism, and Romantic Rebellion, 1750-1830.
A study of selected German literary works written during the Enlightenment, the period of Weimar Classicism, and early Romanticism, including writings by Lessing, Schiller, Goethe, and Kleist. Topics include artistic responses to enlightened absolutism, the French Revolution and the impact of Napoleon's victories on Germany, images of authority and rebellion, gender relations, growing urbanization, and attitudes toward religion and nature. Prerequisite(s): GER 233. Enrollment limited to 29. [AC] [HS] J. Kazecki.
GER 252. Tracing the Autobiographical: Personal Narratives in German Literature.
The course focuses on autobiographical writings in German literature. Students consider questions about the self-presentation of the authors as narrators of their own stories, the relationship between disclosure and literary invention, and the contested area between truth and fiction in autobiographical forms. They investigate how "life-writing" and "self-writing" can be a literary genre that presents issues such as identity, belonging and Otherness, memory, and trauma. Prerequisite(s): GER 233. Enrollment limited to 29. [AC] [CP] R. Cernahoschi, J. Kazecki.
EU/GR 254. Berlin and Vienna, 1900–1914.
From the beginning of the twentieth century to the outbreak of World War I, the capital cities of Berlin and Vienna were home to major cultural and political developments, from diverse movements in art, architecture, literature, and music to the growth of mass party politics. The ascending German Empire and the multiethnic Habsburg Empire teetering on the verge of collapse provide the context within which this course examines diverse texts illuminating the national, generational, class, and gender questions of the time.. Topics may include urban growth and planning, class and gender-based divisions, masculinity and militarism, and imperial ambitions. Conducted in English. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 29. [AC] [HS] R. Cernahoschi, J. Kazecki.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

GER 256. The Age of Materialism, 1830-1899.
The nineteenth century saw the profound transformation of Germany and Austria at all levels of society. The Napoleonic Wars, the failed revolutions of 1848, the ascent of Prussia and the divisions within the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy, the crumbling of feudalism and the emergence of nationalism, scientific advances, and industrialization contributed to the rethinking of political, economic, and social roles, the relationship between the human and the natural worlds, and the nature of reality itself. The course focuses on the investigation of the materiality of the human condition through selected literary, artistic, journalistic, and other texts of the period. Prerequisite(s): GER 233. Enrollment limited to 29. [AC] [HS] R. Cernahoschi, A. Hamilton.
GER 264. World War I in German Culture.
This course explores the ways in which the memory of World War I informs German culture from 1918 to the present, with an emphasis on the literature and film of the Weimar Republic. Topics include the literary representation of the experience of the war, the impact of the war on Weimar cinema, the instrumentalization of the Great War in Nazi ideology and artistic production, as well as strategies of commemoration of World War I in post-1945 German culture. Prerequisite(s): GER 233. Enrollment limited to 29. [AC] [CP] J. Kazecki.
Interdisciplinary Programs

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

GER 350. Margins and Migrations.
What is German literature? The course examines this question through the lens of writers who are difficult to incorporate into a national narrative. The first part of the course focuses on literatures produced on the margins of the German and Austrian empires in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, while the second part studies the effects of postwar labor migrations and globalization on contemporary German, Austrian, and Swiss literatures. Prerequisite(s): GER 233. This course may be repeated once for credit. Enrollment limited to 15. [AC] [CP] R. Cernahoschi, J. Kazecki.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

GER 358. Literature and Film of the German Democratic Republic.
This course explores the ways in which literature and film reflect and refract the social and political experiments of the GDR. Topics include the doctrine of Socialist Realism and its (mis)applications, coming to terms with the past, the emergence and problematization of new gender models, youth culture and generational tensions, the role of the individual in socialist society, censorship and artistic experimentation, conformity and resistance, popular culture and the artistic underground, and industrialization and environmental concerns. Attention is given to the sociohistorical contexts of the examined works and the means and ends of literary and cinematic creations of (alternate) realities. Prerequisite(s): GER 233. Enrollment limited to 15. R. Cernahoschi.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

GER 360. Independent Study.
Students, in consultation with a faculty advisor, individually design and plan a course of study or research not offered in the curriculum. Course work includes a reflective component, evaluation, and completion of an agreed-upon product. Sponsorship by a faculty member in the program/department, a course prospectus, and permission of the chair are required. Students may register for no more than one independent study per semester. Normally offered every semester. Staff.
GER 365. Special Topics.
Designed for the small seminar group of students who may have particular interests in areas of study that go beyond the regular course offerings. Periodic conferences and papers are required. Permission of the department is required. Staff.
GER 457. Senior Thesis.
A capstone project, which may take the form of a written research paper, community-engaged project, translation project, or digital portfolio, designed in consultation with the faculty advisor. Students register for German 457 in the fall semester. Majors writing an honors thesis register for both German 457 and 458. Enrollment limited to 15. [W3] Normally offered every year. Staff.
GER 458. Senior Thesis.
A capstone project, which may take the form of a written research paper, community-engaged project, translation project, or digital portfolio, designed in consultation with the faculty advisor. Students register for German 458 in the winter semester. Majors writing an honors thesis register for both German 457 and 458. Enrollment limited to 15. [W3] Normally offered every year. Staff.
Short Term Courses
GER s26. The Split Screen: Reconstructing National Identities in West and East German Cinema.
This course investigates selected films from West and East German after 1945. Students engage a broad range of topics and issues that define the popular view of Germany and its cultures today. They discuss Germany's Nazi past, the postwar division of the country and its reunification in 1990, the legacies of the 1968 generation, and the role of minorities in contemporary Germany. The course also provides students with basic tools of film analysis, which are used in the discussion of cinematic art and in the analysis of the specific aesthetic qualities of a film. Conducted in English. Not open to students who have received credit for GER 262. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 29. [AC] [HS] J. Kazecki.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

GER s50. Independent Study.
Students, in consultation with a faculty advisor, individually design and plan a course of study or research not offered in the curriculum. Course work includes a reflective component, evaluation, and completion of an agreed-upon product. Sponsorship by a faculty member in the program/department, a course prospectus, and permission of the chair are required. Students may register for no more than one independent study during a Short Term. Normally offered every year. Staff.
Russian

Minor in Russian

A minor requires a minimum of seven courses in Russian. At least one of the seven courses must involve a study of literature or culture (taught either in the language or in translation), but only one course in translation may be counted toward the minor. A student may petition to have up to three comparable courses, completed at other institutions either in the United States or abroad, apply toward the minor. Advanced Placement courses may not be applied toward the minor.

Pass/Fail Grading Option

Pass/fail grading may be elected for 101, 102, 201, 202, 301, and 302.

Courses
RUSS 101. Elementary Russian I.
This course, offered in the fall semester as part of a yearlong sequence, introduces students to Russian language and culture with an emphasis on listening and speaking. Students also experience the richness of modern Russia through a variety of authentic texts including music, art, film, and television. Conducted in Russian. Enrollment limited to 29. Normally offered every year. [AC] [CP] D. Browne, M. Loginova.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

RUSS 102. Elementary Russian II.
This course, offered in the winter semester, is a continuation of RUSS 101 with an emphasis on listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students continue their introduction to modern Russia through authentic texts including music, film, and television excerpts, and selected items from recent newspapers and the Internet. Conducted in Russian. Enrollment limited to 29. Normally offered every year. [AC] [CP] D. Browne, M. Loginova.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

RUSS 201. Intermediate Russian I.
This course, offered in the fall semester, is a continuation of Elementary Russian, focusing on vocabulary acquisition and greater control of more complex and extended forms of discourse. Conducted in Russian. Prerequisite(s): RUSS 102. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 29. Normally offered every year. [AC] [CP] D. Browne, M. Loginova.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

RUSS 202. Intermediate Russian II.
This course, offered in the winter semester, is a continuation of RUSS 201 and completes students' introduction to the formal aspects of Russian language. Emphasis is placed on students' use of Russian to express themselves orally and in writing. Conducted in Russian. Prerequisite(s): RUSS 201. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 29. Normally offered every year. [AC] [CP] D. Browne, M. Loginova.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

EU/RU 213. Russian Identities and National Values in Russian Literature.
The present tensions between the United States and Russia have often been described as a clash of civilizations. This course places the contemporary debates into a wider historical context. Students analyze Russian literary texts from nineteenth and twentieth centuries, with some study of much earlier works. Students examine works by Alexander Pushkin, Nickolay Gogol, Fyodor Dostoevsky, and Mikhail Bulgakov, among others, to critically consider Russian national values, the construction of a Russian national identity, and Russia's relationship to the "West." They also study Russian and Soviet films and their representations of these questions. Conducted in English. Enrollment limited to 29. [W2] [AC] [HS] M. Loginova.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

ES/RU 216. Nature in the Cultures of Russia.
This course explores the connections among environment, culture, and identity in the Eurasian landmass that has been home to Russians, Siberians, and Central Asians. After a brief consideration of the ways in which Russian identities have been grounded in deeply conservative understandings of land and peasantry, students consider alternative and revisionist versions that draw on "nature" to explore gender, sexuality, and ethnicity, often in direct opposition to the state. Conducted in English. Prerequisite(s): ENVR 205 or one course in European studies or Russian. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 29. Staff.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

RUSS 301. Advanced Russian I.
This course, normally offered in the fall semester, focuses on the essentials of contemporary colloquial Russian. Students read short unabridged texts in both literary and journalistic styles, and write one- and two-page papers on a variety of topics. Conducted in Russian. Prerequisite(s): RUSS 202. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 15. Normally offered every year. [AC] [CP] D. Browne, M. Loginova.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

RUSS 302. Advanced Russian II.
This course, normally offered in the winter semester, is a continuation of RUSS 301, in which students read and discuss texts in a variety of styles from political speeches to short novels, from songs to feature-length films. Students write a number of short papers ranging from opinion pieces to literary parodies. Conducted in Russian. Prerequisite(s): RUSS 202. Enrollment limited to 15. Normally offered every year. [AC] [CP] D. Browne, M. Loginova.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

RUSS 306. Advanced Russian Culture and Language.
This course develops oral fluency and aural acuity as well as reading and writing skills through directed and spontaneous classroom activities and individual and collaborative written assignments. Conversations and compositions are based on feature films and film criticism, documentary films, and short fiction and nonfiction texts. Conducted in Russian. Prerequisite(s): RUSS 202. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 15. [AC] [CP] M. Loginova.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

RUSS 360. Independent Study.
Students, in consultation with a faculty advisor, individually design and plan a course of study or research not offered in the curriculum. Course work includes a reflective component, evaluation, and completion of an agreed-upon product. Sponsorship by a faculty member in the program/department, a course prospectus, and permission of the chair are required. Students may register for no more than one independent study per semester. Normally offered every semester. Staff.
RUSS 365. Special Topics.
Designed for the small seminar group of students who may have particular interests in areas of study that go beyond the regular course offerings. Periodic conferences and papers are required. Conducted in Russian. Instructor permission is required. Staff.
RUSS 401. Contemporary Russian I.
The course is designed to perfect students' ability to understand and speak contemporary, idiomatic Russian. Included are readings from Chekhov, Vysotsky, Okudzhava, Galich. Students also view selected documentary and theatrical performances. Conducted in Russian. Prerequisite(s): Russian 301 or 302. Maybe be repeated with permission of instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. [AC] [CP] D. Browne.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

Short Term Courses
RUSS s50. Independent Study.
Students, in consultation with a faculty advisor, individually design and plan a course of study or research not offered in the curriculum. Course work includes a reflective component, evaluation, and completion of an agreed-upon product. Sponsorship by a faculty member in the program/department, a course prospectus, and permission of the chair are required. Students may register for no more than one independent study during a Short Term. Normally offered every semester. Staff.