Faculty External Grants Awarded 2007-2008

The following faculty received external grant awards between August 2007 and July 2008

William G. Ambrose, Jr. (Biology) received funding from the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration for Growth and long Term Abundance Patterns of the Bloodworm (Glycera dibranchiate).

Rachel N. Austin (Chemistry) received funding from the Department of Energy – University of Maine subcontract for Thermal conversion of Woody Biomass to Fuels and Chemicals, and funding from the National Institute of Health for the Environmental Bioinorganic Gordon Research Conference.

Anna S. Bartel (Harward Center for Community Partnerships) received funding from the Corporation for National Community Service – Princeton University CBR Innovation Subaward.

Ryan W. Bavis (Biology) received additional funding from the Maine INBRE (IDeA Network of Biomedical Research Excellence)/NIH for Mechanisms Underlying Hyperoxia-induced Respiratory Plasticity.

Rebecca Herzig (Women and Gender Studies) received funding from the National Science Foundation for RNAi, Race, and the Domestication of Biotechnology: The Emergence of Cosmetic Genomics.

Nancy W. Kleckner (Biology) received funding from the National Science Foundation for Characterization of Glutamate Receptors in the Pond Snails, Helisoma trivolvis  and Biomphalaria glabrata.

Nancy S. Koven (Psychology) received funding from the Maine Institute for human Genetics and Health for Neurogentics of Executive Dysfunction in Alexithymia: The Role of the COMT Genotype.

Lynne Y. Lewis (Economics) received funding from the Maine Water Research Institute for Measuring and Incorporating Stakeholders Values into River Restoration Decisions: A Socio-economic Analysis.

Kathryn G. Low (Psychology) received funding from the American Association of Colleges and Universities for Engaged Learning and Mental health: Exploring the types of Learning Associated with Student Flourishing.

Rebecca J. Sommer (Biology) received additional funding from the Maine INBRE (IDeA Network of Biomedical Research Excellence)/NIH for Dioxin Exposure Impairs Embryonic Heart Development: Comparative and Functional Genomics of Cardiac β1-adrenergic Receptors.

Thomas J. Wenzel (Chemistry) received additional funding from the National Science Foundation for Chiral NMR Shift Reagents.