Links

  • This is the official homepage of the Geological Society of America (GSA). It contains updates on GSA Meetings, bookloads of geological information, and other various pieces of information as well. Geological Society of America
  • The United States Government’s own “geology department” is called the United States Geological Survey. Visit it below: United States Geological Survey
  • The American Geophysical Union (AGU) maintains a large Web site featuring information about the organization and its various publications and twice-yearly meetings. Abstracts for the meetings are available on-line as are the contents of recent AGU journals including the Journal of Geophysical Research, Geophysical Research Letters, Reiews of Geophysics, Tectonics, and Geotectonics (a translated Russian journal). American Geophysical Union
  • The Maine Geological Survey has a homepage, containing information about its operations, projects, history, and other interesting resources. Maine Geological Survey
  • The World-Wide Earthquake Locator from the Department of Geography at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland. This is a server that takes recent earthquake information from the USGS National Earthquake Information Center and map information from the Xerox PARC map server and displays custom maps showing earthquakes occurring throughout the world during the past week. Earthquake Locations
  • Here is the impressive, information-filled geology web page of Cornell University. Take a look at their web site. Cornell University: Department of Geology
  • Check out this Structural Geology web site: Structural Geology
  • The New England Intercollegiate Geological Conference (NEIGC) is held annually in the fall.  NEIGC
  • The entire NEIGC 2017 guidebook as well as individual field guides for each of the trips are available on-line for free download here: http://scarab.bates.edu/neigc2017/