Grant News

Check out these recent articles about grant-funded research and initiatives at Bates from the Bates Communications team!

GRANTS@BATES

March 2019

In this Issue:

  • Caroline Shaw wins a NEH Fellowship to study the “right to reputation” in Britain
  • Does going to college affect your health outcomes in life? Nate Tefft and his collaborators study this question
  • Andrew Kennedy receives support for research on Pitt-Hopkins Syndrome
  • Jeff Oishi has received two installments of NASA funding for his research
  • Bates Dance Festival receives two grants to support the upcoming Bates Dance Festival 2019 season
  • National Science Foundation awards grant to Amy Douglass to study effects of using video-recording during eyewitness lineup identifications
  • Calling all Pivot Users – an important change in URL

Caroline Shaw wins a NEH Fellowship to study the “right to reputation” in Britain

Caroline Shaw has received a $60K Fellowship from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Caroline, a recipient of a 2017 NEH Summer Stipend, will use the fellowship to complete a draft of her book on the contentious right to personal reputation in modern Britain c. 1750-2000. Drawing on legal reports, political commentary, gossip columns, and etiquette manuals, among other sources, the book explores the history of Britain’s peculiar defamation laws during a time of growing freedom of speech.

Does going to college affect your health outcomes in later life? Nate Tefft and his collaborators study this question

Prof. Nathan Tefft, as part of a collaboration team led by Dr. Ben Cowan at the Washington State University, has been awarded a two-year grant from the Evidence for Action Program of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to research how post-secondary education is associated with health outcomes in later life.  Prof. Tefft has received an initial subaward from Washington State University of $5,320 for year 1 of the project. FMI: http://news.cahnrs.wsu.edu/article/go-to-college-to-live-longer-wsu-economist-receives-grant-to-study-health-effects-of-higher-learning/

Andrew Kennedy receives support for research on Pitt-Hopkins Syndrome

Last month, the Orphan Disease Center at the University of Pennsylvania awarded Prof. Andrew Kennedy a grant entitled, “Tissue-specific and temporal reinstatement of Tcf4 function to treat Pitt-Hopkins Syndrome.” The grant, in the amount of $51,242, will test whether gene replacement therapy is effective at improving cognition in Pitt-Hopkins Syndrome, a rare monogenic intellectual disability on the autism spectrum.

Jeff Oishi has received two installments of NASA funding for his research

Prof. Jeff Oishi has received two NASA subawards from multi-institutional collaborations led by Prof. Benjamin Brown at the University of Colorado at Boulder. The first award, in the amount of $35,076, is the final installment of Year 4 funding on the NASA-funded project, entitled, “Stellar Insights into Solar Magnetism: Exploring Fundamental Dynamo Physics across the Lower Main Sequence.” Prof. Oishi will continue his study of the how the sun builds its magnetic field by performing high-resolution numerical simulations. The second award, in the amount of $7,291, is the first installment of a three year NASA-funded research project, entitled, “Atmospheric waves in gas planets: energy and chemical transport.” Prof. Oishi will use the award funding to develop analytical models and simulations to explore gravity wave breaking activity found in the atmospheres of giant planets. Total award expected over three years is $37,778.

Bates Dance Festival receives two grants to support the upcoming Bates Dance Festival 2019 season

The Bates Dance Festival (BDF), an international destination for contemporary dance, has received two grants to help support the Bates Dance Festival 2019 season. BDF has received a $10,000 grant from the Department of Economic & Community Development’s Maine Office of Tourism under the Tourism Enterprise Marketing Grant program. The grant will fund marketing and advertising fees in several major metropolitan areas to increase visibility of the festival to promote tourism to the Lewiston-Auburn region. BDF has also secured support for another year from the National Endowment for the Arts, with an ArtWorks grant in the amount of $40K, to fund multiple performances throughout the Lewiston/Auburn Community and to attract more cultural tourism to the area.

National Science Foundation awards grant to Amy Douglass to study effects of using video-recording during eyewitness lineup identifications

Currently the criminal justice system recommends the use of video-recording during eyewitness lineup identifications even though there is almost no research available on the effects of such a recommendation on eyewitness accuracy. Prof. Amy Douglass and her collaborator, Prof. Charman from the Florida International University, through a three-year grant from the National Science Foundation’s Law and Social Sciences program, will study what the benefits and costs are on using video-recording during lineup identification procedures and to test this method for evaluating eyewitness accuracy. Total award for Bates College is $130,772 and is funded through the Research in Undergraduate Institutions funding mechanism at NSF.  

Calling all Pivot Users – an important change in URL

Bates College subscribes to an online funding opportunity search database called Pivot, which is accessible to all Bates employees. As of March 1, 2019, Pivot has moved to a new URL: https://pivot.proquest.com. Please be sure to update saved links to Pivot as the old URL is now discontinued. Not a Pivot user but interested in learning more about Pivot? The Office of Sponsored Programs and Research Compliance (SPaRC) provides information and training on how to use Pivot and can help set up curated searches to find funding opportunities for your project interests.

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