Stories about "Diversity"
PHOTO DATE: November 05, 2018LOCATION: NBL - Pool TopsideSUBJECT: 2017 ASCAN class members Warren Hoburg and Loral O'Hara (Blue Team) during ASCAN EVQ NBL 3 training.PHOTOGRAPHER: Josh Valcarcel
Here’s what the NASA astronaut said to the Bates sophomore STEM students

Wednesday, December 9, 2020 4:36 pm

NASA astronaut Loral O'Hara joined a sophomore science class as part of program that seeks to disrupt the "weed-out" approach to STEM education.

Just July. Or as Professor of French and Francophone Studies Kirk Read says: “We are in that month we wish could last forever.”Hathorn Hall and Historic Quad
Transformative: The Bates Mission Statement at age 10

Thursday, May 28, 2020 1:09 pm

Even as COVID-19 puts it to the test, the 2010 mission statement is a cultural touchstone for Bates.

2020 MLK Day Keynote AddressBiased: Uncovering the Hidden Prejudice That Shapes What We See, Think, and DoJennifer Lynn Eberhardt, Professor of Psychology, Stanford University.Jennifer Lynn Eberhardt of Stanford University gives the 2020 Martin Luther King Jr. Day keynote address at Bates. (Nana Kofi Nti)Jennifer Lynn Eberhardt of Stanford University gives the 2020 Martin Luther King Jr. Day keynote address at Bates. (Nana Kofi Nti)A social psychologist at Stanford, Eberhardt investigates the consequences of the psychological association between race and crime. Through interdisciplinary collaborations and a wide ranging array of methods — from laboratory studies to novel field experiments — Eberhardt has revealed the startling, and often dispiriting, extent to which racial imagery and judgments suffuse our culture and society, and in particular shape actions and outcomes within the domain of criminal justice.
Q&A: Senior Speaker Alexandria Onuoha ’20 and her hope that ‘Bates has students who love all people’

Tuesday, May 26, 2020 2:27 pm

From Onuoha's first campus visit to her majors in psychology and dance to work around inclusivity, the senior looks back, and forward.

Times and dates of five plays during Black History Month at Bates

Thursday, February 6, 2020 10:13 am

Bates’ Africana program offers five plays during Black History Month that use historical events as a springboard to explore white oppression and black resistance.

"According to Mark: Part I: Blood in the Revolution." Commencing a series of plays marking Black History Month at Bates, this 10-minute reading is one of four looking at the 18th-century experiences of black New Englanders and written by Lecturer in Theater Clifford Odle. Sponsored by the Africana program. Commons, Fireplace LoungeThe title character in According to Mark “was a slave who could read and was looking for a way to free himself from an oppressive master. And he felt the Bible provided a path to murdering him as long as he didn’t spill blood.”The play is set during the planning of the murder, which also involved two other slaves, Mark’s sister Phyllis and a woman called Phoebe. In the actual event, Mark was hanged for the murder and Phyllis was burned at the stake — a punishment that in Colonial America was reserved for female slaves who kill their masters, Odle says.Cast: Charles Nero as MarkPerla Figuereo as PhyllisSam Alexander as PhoebeDawrin Silfa as Quaco
The play’s the thing as Bates honors Black History Month

Wednesday, February 5, 2020 1:29 pm

Using theater to convey history “makes things more immediate, more alive," says a Bates playwright.

Moviemakers aren’t the only winners in Bates Film Festival Awards

Friday, January 31, 2020 9:03 am

The process is prized by the students who pick the award-winners, too.

Erni Whitaker '20, a chemistry and philosophy double major.Memphis, 1968: Mixing Material and Virtual RealitiesVirtual reality experience. Derek Ham’s interactive virtual reality (VR) video I Am a Man explores the 1968 Memphis sanitation workers’ strike as one of the events leading up to the assassination of Dr. King. The VR provides a personal experience that deepens our understanding of the struggles of the Black workers and residents of Memphis. Along with Ham’s award-winning VR experience, the exhibit includes replicas and copies of primary documents from the Memphis strike. Led by: Cori Hoover, Academic Technology Consultant, and Chris Schiff, Music and Arts Librarian. Organized by: Michael Hanrahan, Director for Curricular and Research Computing.Coram 102
Picture story: MLK Day at Bates 2020

Friday, January 24, 2020 1:15 pm

Bates photographers Phyllis Graber Jensen and Theophil Syslo cover the college’s 2020 MLK Day observance from start to finish.

‘Ask questions’: Insights from student legal translators

Friday, January 24, 2020 12:01 pm

In an MLK Day panel, volunteers explained the complexities of providing legal translation for refugees and asylum seekers. 

2020 MLK Day Keynote AddressBiased: Uncovering the Hidden Prejudice That Shapes What We See, Think, and DoJennifer Lynn Eberhardt, Professor of Psychology, Stanford University.Jennifer Lynn Eberhardt of Stanford University gives the 2020 Martin Luther King Jr. Day keynote address at Bates. (Nana Kofi Nti)Jennifer Lynn Eberhardt of Stanford University gives the 2020 Martin Luther King Jr. Day keynote address at Bates. (Nana Kofi Nti)A social psychologist at Stanford, Eberhardt investigates the consequences of the psychological association between race and crime. Through interdisciplinary collaborations and a wide ranging array of methods — from laboratory studies to novel field experiments — Eberhardt has revealed the startling, and often dispiriting, extent to which racial imagery and judgments suffuse our culture and society, and in particular shape actions and outcomes within the domain of criminal justice.
‘I don’t know why I said that’: MLK Day keynote looks at hidden bias

Thursday, January 23, 2020 10:12 am

Biased author Jennifer Eberhardt's talk was rich in science, often sobering, yet ultimately uplifting.

Martin Luther King Jr. Day 2020: Building justice from the ground up

Thursday, January 16, 2020 1:09 pm

The theme for this year's programming: “From the Ground Up: Inequity, Bias, Privilege, Structure, Death.”

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