Stories about "Diversity"
As part of a team including Bates humanities librarian Christina Bell, noted childrenauthor-illustrator Anne Sibley O'Brien, and Brenna Callahan '15, Associate Professor of Psychology Krista Aronson has created the Picture Book Project: a set of interrelated resources that bring new accessibility to the world of diverse childrens books:A comprehensive collection of some 2,000 diverse books, housed at the Georgeand Helen Ladd Library, that is unique in that the books are available for anyoneto sign out; the Diverse BookFinder, a database and search language mirroring the collection, which for the first time makes diverse picture books findable by both the human characteristics and, importantly, narrative themes that recur in them; and an analytical tool, based on the DBF resources, that will enable librarians tounderstand how diversity is represented in their own childrens sections.
In its third year, Bates’ Diverse BookFinder is more accessible than ever

Tuesday, November 19, 2019 2:50 pm

Between a powerful children's book Search Tool and expanded outreach to libraries, parents and book professionals alike are increasingly making use of this unique Bates resource.

Q&A: ‘Chasing Portraits’ brings Rynecki ’91 full circle, back to Bates

Thursday, November 7, 2019 2:34 pm

“It’s full circle,” says Elizabeth Rynecki ’91, “which is fabulous.” A rhetoric...

Investing in student success: Meet Bates faculty new to the tenure track in 2019

Thursday, September 19, 2019 10:40 am

Five professors newly appointed to the tenure track have found that their values, interests, and goals are reflected in the Bates community.

Convocation speaker Dolores Huerta to the Class of ’23: ‘We have the power’

Wednesday, September 4, 2019 4:04 pm

Not every Bates academic year begins with a legend of the American labor movement leading a chant of “Yes we can!”

“We are piloting the experiment for these students’ thesis experiments. They were piloting Hannah’s experiment. She’s interested in looking at the extent to which visual masking actually inhibits perception. So when you take a visual mask, you take an image followed by another image, you’re impaired at understanding the first image. The question is why. So what we’re going to do is take the neural activity that we’re measuring. And the nice thing about EEG is that it measures millisecond by millisecond electrical potentials that are generated in the brain , we measure them from the scalp. And we can see over time what the brain is processing and we use machine learning, we put these signals into a computer system tha t reads out the extent to which there is information about what the picture is. We’re wondering, does that information persist when you change the image? Does that persist over time? Hannah’s made the experiment, and we are going to try it out to make sure everything’s ready for participants.”? Michelle Greene, assistant professor of neuroscience, says of three thesis students in neuroscience: “They’re all terrific, I might add.”Hanna De Bruyn ‘18, Old Lyme, Conn. (black striped sweater with glasses)Katherine “Katie” Hartnett ’18 of St. Paul, Minn. (wearing EEG cap with Bates sweatshirt)Julie Self ’18 of Redwood City, Calif. (blue plaid shirt)Email from Hanna: Katie Harnett and I will be testing out our computational neuroscience theses and will be hooking each other up to the EEG tomorrow, Friday, at 12:45-2:30ish in the Bates Computational Vision Lab (Hathorn 108). 
Bates announces $3.97 million National Science Foundation grant for visual database project

Friday, August 16, 2019 11:02 am

The largest-ever federal grant awarded to Bates, the award will fuel creation of a vast video gallery to support research in various fields, including artificial intelligence.

Professor of Biology April Hill in her Carnegie Science Lab, Room 404, training two "new scientists." “For me, it’s like being a coach," she says. Names forthcoming.The two students in the lab with Hill are Sara King ’21 of Newton Center, Mass., and Jasmine Nutakki ’21 of Augusta, Maine. Hill says: “They were learning to use a technique called the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to amplify genes from freshwater sponges. Both students (and some others) will be working over short term on a project funded by my NSF grant to study the gene networks involved in animal:algal symbioses. In this case, the animals are sponges and the algae are Chlorella.” 
Hill and Wageners team up to ensure that all STEM students thrive at Bates

Thursday, May 2, 2019 1:57 pm

Students in science and math are entitled to thrive, not just survive, says April Hill, the Wagener Family Professor for Equity and Inclusion in STEM.

To address today’s problems, look to Ella Baker, says scholar-activist Barbara Ransby

Thursday, March 28, 2019 4:19 pm

In her postponed Martin Luther King Jr. Day keynote, the renowned historian helps us parlay lessons of the past into a brighter future.

Look What We Found: Wes Chaney’s historical contracts

Tuesday, March 5, 2019 6:06 pm

“The history of Chinese emperors and generals has been written,” says Assistant Professor of History Wes Chaney. “I’m interested in telling the stories of everyday life.”

Recalling when Bates fought, yet benefited from, a racist debate organization

Thursday, February 28, 2019 3:33 pm

Fraught and frustrating efforts by Bates to get the national Delta Sigma Rho debate society to admit black members reveals a stark conflict between Bates’ ideals and the reality in which it operated.

Video: Student talent and creativity take the stage on Sangai Asia Night

Thursday, February 28, 2019 12:04 pm

“Seeing all the Asian cultures come together and celebrate each other’s art” — that's Sangai Asia Night at Bates.

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