James Richter

James G. Richter

207-786-6134

jrichter@bates.edu

Politics

Professor

Pettengill Hall, Room 165

European Studies

B.A., Cornell University; M.A., Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley

Curriculum Vitae

My current research pursues two different but related tracks. First, following upon earlier scholarship on the role of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in Russian governance under Putin, I am working on a long-term project that compares and contrasts the relation between state and society in Russia and China. I am particularly interested in tracing continuing patterns of governance back through the imperial period of the 19th century.

My second line of research consists of a number of shorter studies in the politics of memory throughout Eastern Europe and Eurasia. I have two articles near completion, one comparing the different ways in which collectivization is commemorated in Kazakhstan and Ukraine, and another analyzing Putin’s efforts to manage the memory of the Russian revolutions during the centennial year of 2017. Other potential studies in this period include the politics of memory surrounding the expulsion of Germans in Poland and the Czech government, and the transnational diffusion of memory through institutes of history in many of the Eastern European states.

Earlier research has included a study of how US foreign policy impacted Soviet debates on foreign policy during the cold war, resulting in the book, published in 1994, entitled “Khrushchev’s Double Bind” as well as a number of articles on Russian identity in foreign policy, the impact of Western efforts to promote civil society and democracy in Russia, and the role of civil society in Putin’s authoritarian regime.

Courses Taught in 2017-1018

Because of my administrative duties as division chair of the social sciences, I will be teaching only two courses this year:

Fall, 2017
Ethnicity and Conflict

Winter, 2018
Politics of Post-Communism

Other Courses:
International Politics
Global Politics of Climate Change
International Peacekeeping
The Politics of Memory in Central and Eastern Europe