Faculty Workshop Archive

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Fall 2017 Writing @ Bates Workshops for Faculty & Staff

Reading Like A Writer: Using Assigned Reading to Improve Students’ Genre Awareness

Workshop materials available here.

9/12/17, Noon, Hathorn 303

Encouraging Students to Practice (in Writing) the Critical Thinking You Value

We think carefully about our course designs and many of us have course objectives that we outline in our syllabi to reflect the kinds of critical thinking we value in our field. But how do we know our students are clued in to those values? How can we make more apparent and encourage students to practice the kinds of critical thinking we value? This workshop will offer a space for instructors to consider and share the kinds of critical thinking skills valued in their disciplines and to brainstorm strategies for supporting and guiding students to practice those skills in their writing.

Workshop materials available here. Powerpoint. Handout.

10/3, Noon, PGILL G10

The Norton Field Guide to Writing Coursepack: An Overview and How-to Guide

The Norton Field Guide to Writing comes with electronic access, for both you and your students, to a large library of materials (quizzes, tutorials, handouts, and other resources) that supplement the text and support the teaching of writing. These materials are excellent and helpful, but can be a bit overwhelming to dive into.This session will provide an overview of these materials, and a guide to integrating them with your Lyceum course.

Facilitated by Dan Sanford

10/11, 4:15 PM, Coram Computer Lab

InQuizitive: Gamified Learning to support the Teaching of Writing

InQuizitive is an adaptive quizzing tool that combines interactive questions about writing, academic honesty, citation, and grammar with game-like elements to engage students in a format similar to popular language-learning apps. If you’re interested in using this resource (which is available to all FYS faculty and to all faculty using the Norton Field Guide to Writing) in your courses, please come for in introduction to the tool and a guide to integrating it with your course in Lyceum. For a preview of InQuizitive, visit http://inquizitive.wwnorton.com.

Facilitated by Dan Sanford

10/17, Noon, Coram Computer Lab

The Gallery Walk and Other Strategies for Teaching Research as a Recursive Process

This interactive workshop will lead participants through a series of activities that help writers generate good research questions, define the scope of a research project, and revise their questions and their scope in response to preliminary research. While you are invited to bring your own research questions, your students’ research questions, or assignments from your classes, no prior preparation is necessary. Please RSVP here.

10/25, 4:15 PM, PGILL G10

Tools for Faster, Better Grading

Commenting on and grading papers can be one of the most time-consuming parts of faculty life. By focusing your energy, it’s possible to both spend less time grading, and provide more useful feedback for your students. In this workshop, we’ll cover a few principles for fast and pedagogically effective assessment, as well as a few tools that can completely change the way you grade. Please RSVP here.

10/31, Noon, PGILL 257

The Four R’s of Effective Peer Review

Asking students to peer workshop their writing can seem like a time-consuming activity that doesn’t always pay off in ways you’d hoped. However, offering students a few preparatory pointers on how (and why) to read each other’s writing respectfully and responsibly with an eye towards revision can build communities of writers that insist on responsible membership and avoid the “culture of nice.” This workshop will present research on effective peer review and offer tangible and simple go-to strategies for facilitating targeted and more generative peer feedback in your courses. Cover Sheet for Post Review Draft, Peer Review Benefits, Review Memo, SAMPLE of a Class Peer Review Contract, Straub: Responding to Student Writing, The Four Rs of Effective Peer Review

11/7, Noon, PGILL G10

Inclusive Research Methods

In this workshop, we will begin to address the pressing issue of inclusivity by exploring the following questions: What are the origins of research methods in the sciences, the social sciences, and the humanities? How do research methods relate to culturally-specific epistemologies? Where have underrepresented minorities been marginalized in conventional histories of research? What can we learn from alternative histories and indigenous methodologies? How can we make our research methods more inclusive? Workshop slideshow available here.

11/8, 4:15 PM, PGILL G10

Supporting English Language Learners as Writers

Working with ELL writers presents a unique set of challenges. How do you work with student writers when your usual guiding principles don’t apply? How do you focus your efforts, presented with a large number of surface errors? How can you use your class to meaningfully move your ELL students towards fluency? Join us as we explore these and other questions!

11/15, 4:15 PM, PGILL G10

Revisioning Strategies: Helping Students Re-see Their Writing

Students often consider proofreading, editing, and revising interchangeable writing skills. However, each implies a very different way of re-seeing a piece of writing and each requires a particular level of close reading and metacognitive self-awareness. In this workshop, participants will tease apart the differences between proofreading, editing, and revision and will learn about and share strategies for helping students grasp these differences and attempt bigger revision risks (with bigger pay-offs) in their writing.

12/5, Noon, PGILL G10

Winter 2018 Writing @ Bates Workshops for Faculty & Staff

Writing@Bates Drop-in Hours at the Den

Interested in making changes to an upcoming writing assignment? Thinking ahead to designing next year’ courses? Wondering how best to work with a particular student writer? Would you like someone to talk through one of your own papers with? From 4 to 5 on Wednesdays, we’ll be available at the Den to help you think & work through any issue that you may be facing as a writer, scholar, or teacher of writing.

The Den – Every Wednesday, 4PM-5PM

 

Writing Workshop for Faculty

Starting with the premise that explicit attention to our own writing processes and the processes of our colleagues not only helps us improve as writers but also helps us improve as writing teachers, we invite you to join Writing @ Bates’s faculty writing workshop. Bring your own writing in any form–even just notes and ideas–to these interactive workshop where we will share research-based practices for developing and refining writing projects and invite you to share your works-in-progress. Our goal is to create a community of faculty writers that will help participants improve their writing and teaching.

Facilitated by Bridget Fullerton and Stephanie Wade

Monday, Jan 22, 4PM, Hedge 208

Coffee and a snack will be provided. Please RSVP here.

 

Integrating ARC with your courses

While almost everyone knows that students can be referred to ARC for tutoring, ARC offers so much more. Did you know that you have a say in who the tutor is for your course? Did you know that ARC can train your TA in peer-led learning? Did you know you can hold office hours at ARC or send your students to do group work there? Did you know that ARC tutors can visit your class to talk about study habits? This session will explore the many ways that you might consider integrating ARC with your course.

Presented by Dan Sanford and Stephanie Wade
Tuesday, January 23, Noon, Hedge 208
Lunch will be provided. Please RSVP here.
Assigning and Grading Writing in the Large Course

This workshop presents tried & tested strategies for effectively integrating writing assignments in large courses.

Presented by Dan Sanford
Tuesday, January 30, Noon, Hedge 208
Lunch will be provided. Please RSVP here.
Digital Writing and Multimodal Composition Workshops

Media literacy. Multimedia. Re-mediation. Multimodality. The field of composition has long been interested in these concepts and the implications they have for writing pedagogy and student engagement at the college level. Please join Stephanie Wade and Bridget Fullerton of Writing at Bates along with Matthew Jadud of Digital and Computational Studies Michael Hanrahan of Curricular and Research Computing in this interactive, two-part series in which we will define and review examples of digital writing and multimodal projects, discuss the benefits and challenges of writing in and beyond alphabetic text, and workshop your assignments to incorporate more modal and digital diversity. Feel free to attend one or both. Please bring an assignment to share and revise (i.e. re-mediate).

February 16, 2018 12pm-1pm

March 2, 2018 12pm-1pm

Lunch will be provided. Please RSVP here.

Implicit Bias and the Grading of Student Writing

Writing, and the assessing of writing, can get messy. Our reactions to any given piece of writing can be extremely personal and idiosyncratic, and often depend critically on our own educational and literary background. More troublingly, our own unconscious assumptions and attitudes about language and writing may show up in our assessment of student of writing. This workshop explores strategies for avoiding an effect from implicit bias on our grading.

Presented by Dan Sanford
Tuesday, February 27, Noon, Hedge 208
Lunch will be provided. Please RSVP here.
Writing Workshop for Faculty

Starting with the premise that explicit attention to our own writing processes and the processes of our colleagues not only helps us improve as writers but also helps us improve as writing teachers, we invite you to join Writing @ Bates’s faculty writing workshop. Bring your own writing in any form–even just notes and ideas–to these interactive workshop where we will share research-based practices for developing and refining writing projects and invite you to share your works-in-progress. Our goal is to create a community of faculty writers that will help participants improve their writing and teaching.Facilitated by Bridget Fullerton and Stephanie Wade

Tuesday, March 6, Noon, Hedge 208

Lunch will be provided. Please RSVP here.

“Portfolio” Is Not A Four Letter Word

The portfolio, which has its roots in the art and design fields, made its way onto the post-secondary scene in the mid-1980s when composition scholars Peter Elbow and Pat Belanoff at SUNY Stony Brook adapted them as a more ethical and holistic alternative to the models of writing assessment current at the time: grammar tests and timed or one-off cumulative essays. Over the past thirty years, their model has been readily assimilated and reconfigured by researchers and instructors to meet local needs and goals. In other words, portfolios, also known as learning records, can be as dynamic and multidimensional as the institution, program, department, or course instructor that seeks to make a portfolio model its/his/her own. At these two roundtable sessions, we hope to inspire a renewed understanding of the possibilities of portfolios for the Bates community while getting a sense of your past experiences with them–both positive and expletive-riddled. We will offer info on some relevant portfolio models and invite discussion for using portfolios at Bates in ways that honor best practices and meet y/our local needs. Optional: Bring examples of portfolios you’ve composed or used for instruction. You need only attend one session.

Facilitated by Bridget Fullerton and Stephanie Wade from Writing at Bates.

Tuesday, March 27, Noon, Hedge 208, Lunch will be provided.

or

Monday, April 2, 4PM, Hedge 208, Coffee and a snack will be provided.

Please RSVP here.