Stories about "Collaboration"
11 words: Students describe indigenous archaeology in an Alaskan village

Friday, October 11, 2019 12:25 pm

At the site of an abandoned Alaskan village, an alumnus hears 11 words illuminating experiences of students and their professor conducting indigenous archaeology.

Associate Professor of Theater Christine McDowell’s has curated Museum L-A 's shoe exhibition.Museum L-A’s gallery is filled to the brim with shoes for its newest exhibit “Footwear: From Function to Fashion.” The exhibit explores the whimsy and artfulness that shoe designs have played with for decades to acknowledge that shoes, while primarily used as an often-forgotten functional item, can be masterpieces in their own right. A certain focus is placed on the extensive history of the shoe industry in Auburn, once the fifth largest producer of footwear in the country, through a timeline representing the ebb and flow of the local companies historically making shoes in our community. This exhibit is Museum L-A’s next step in the progression of telling this industry’s story – this time focusing on the product that was being created by the millions right in our little corner of Maine while also creating an opportunity to celebrate the 150th Anniversary of the City of Auburn, 1869-2019.
Q&A: Christine McDowell unpacks her shoes

Thursday, October 10, 2019 2:00 pm

In her written greeting to visitors entering an exhibition in Lewiston, Bates theater professor Christine McDowell bares her sole.

Announcing Bobcat339: a student-invented molecule with pharmaceutical promise

Friday, October 4, 2019 11:33 am

Protected by a provisional patent filing, the molecule Bobcat339 speaks to pharmaceutical promise and how students become cutting-edge science researchers at Bates.

Bates College announces record $28.85 million in total gifts for fiscal 2019

Thursday, September 26, 2019 12:01 pm

Gifts to Bates, both great and small, have led to a doubling of yearly giving to the college since 2013.

Move-In DayThe Class of 2023 arrives on campus. Students move into their new residences, attend meetings, eat lunch, pick up AESOP equipment, hear the President's Greeting on the Historic Quad, and say goodbye to their families.
Slideshow: Hour by hour with the Class of 2023 on Opening Day

Thursday, August 29, 2019 3:13 pm

Opening Day sets the tone for these new Bobcats. In the words of longtime dean James Reese, it's a day when the message is, "Everyone’s in!”

Move-In DayPresident’s Welcome AddressAll are invited to enjoy a warm welcome from Clayton Spencer, Bates’ eighth PresidentCoram Library QuadRain Site: Clifton Daggett Gray Athletic Building
Arriving Monday, the Bates Class of 2023 steps into a ‘world of new connections’

Thursday, August 22, 2019 4:28 pm

Learn all about the 501-member Class of 2023, selected from the largest applicant pool in Bates history, and how they'll be welcomed on Monday.

Bobcats find competition, friendship playing summer baseball

Wednesday, August 21, 2019 11:00 pm

For Bobcats playing in a premiere wood-bat summer league, it's time to work on their games and have some fun.

“We are piloting the experiment for these students’ thesis experiments. They were piloting Hannah’s experiment. She’s interested in looking at the extent to which visual masking actually inhibits perception. So when you take a visual mask, you take an image followed by another image, you’re impaired at understanding the first image. The question is why. So what we’re going to do is take the neural activity that we’re measuring. And the nice thing about EEG is that it measures millisecond by millisecond electrical potentials that are generated in the brain , we measure them from the scalp. And we can see over time what the brain is processing and we use machine learning, we put these signals into a computer system tha t reads out the extent to which there is information about what the picture is. We’re wondering, does that information persist when you change the image? Does that persist over time? Hannah’s made the experiment, and we are going to try it out to make sure everything’s ready for participants.”? Michelle Greene, assistant professor of neuroscience, says of three thesis students in neuroscience: “They’re all terrific, I might add.”Hanna De Bruyn ‘18, Old Lyme, Conn. (black striped sweater with glasses)Katherine “Katie” Hartnett ’18 of St. Paul, Minn. (wearing EEG cap with Bates sweatshirt)Julie Self ’18 of Redwood City, Calif. (blue plaid shirt)Email from Hanna: Katie Harnett and I will be testing out our computational neuroscience theses and will be hooking each other up to the EEG tomorrow, Friday, at 12:45-2:30ish in the Bates Computational Vision Lab (Hathorn 108). 
Bates announces $3.97 million National Science Foundation grant for visual database project

Friday, August 16, 2019 11:02 am

The largest-ever federal grant awarded to Bates, the award will fuel creation of a vast video gallery to support research in various fields, including artificial intelligence.

Professor of Geology Beverly Johnson uses a sediment elevation table to measure the height of the Sprague River Salt Marsh, part of the Bates–Morse Mountain Conservation Area..These data are used to measure the response of the marsh to rising sea level and storm activity, Johnson says. Four years ago, she and her Short Term geology students traveled to the Sprague, where they placed rods deep in the marsh as benchmarks to measure future changes.Show with Laura Sewall (in garnet baseball cap), Harward Center for Community Partnerships, Director of Bates Morse Mountain Conservation Area, and Vanessa Paolella '21 of Dingmen's Ferry, Pa., who has been working with Johnson on geology research over the summer.Also present: Clailre Enterline (in green shirt and blue baseball cap), Research Coordinator with the Maine Coastal Program. And (not in selects but wearing a blue baseball cap and blue shirt) Ellen Bartow-Gieelie, Coastal Fellow with the Maine Coastal Program.
Q&A: Laura Sewall on 11 years as Bates–Morse Mountain director

Friday, July 19, 2019 10:30 am

Sewall shares takeaways from the conservation area, including the role of "blue carbon," the toll of climate change, and the value in letting nature take its course.

Summer at the Bates museum: Watercolor master Hardy, seldom-seen art from collection

Monday, June 3, 2019 10:27 am

In ‘DeWitt Hardy: Master of Watercolor,’ five decades’ worth of paintings by one of Maine’s foremost watercolorists are on display at the Bates art museum this summer.

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