Stories about "Science and technology"
From a Distance: The meandering Sprague River at Bates–Morse Mountain

Friday, June 19, 2020 11:51 am

Check out this aerial photo of Bates–Morse Mountain Conservation Area and fun facts from Bates geologists Bev Johnson and Dyk Eusden '80.

Current affairs: Student programmers simplify electricity management

Thursday, June 4, 2020 8:11 am

In a special Digital and Computational Studies project, three seniors join EcoReps to improve how Bates measures campus electrical use.

Associate Professor of Digital and Computational Studies Carrie Diaz Eaton teaches (in Carnegie 226) her course DCS 105. Calling Bull in a Digital World.Our world is rife with misinformation. This course is designed to hone digital citizenship skills. It is about "calling b***s*** ": spotting, dissecting, and publicly refuting false claims and inferences based on quantitative, statistical, and computational analysis of data (with R). Students explore case studies in policy and science; possible examples include food stamps, caffeine, improving traffic, and gendered mortality rates. Students practice visualizing data; interpreting scientific claims; and spotting misinformation, fake news, causal fallacies, and statistical traps. In so doing, the course offers an introduction to programming. New course beginning Winter 2019. Enrollment limited to 29. [Q] C. Diaz Eaton.
Bates professor Carrie Diaz Eaton wins $300K grant to support open education

Friday, April 24, 2020 8:16 am

Reflecting Bates' leadership in the field, Bates professor Carrie Diaz Eaton and colleagues will use a $300,000 grant from the Hewlett Foundation to create and share free educational materials — with a focus on equity.

‘Great work!’ Two seniors meet the honors thesis deadline

Friday, April 3, 2020 12:23 pm

"Hannah Johnson and Emma Wheeler have been great to work with — always positive, always thinking,” says thesis adviser Mike Retelle. ⁣

I am a philosophy major and I got the idea from a younger sibling who has a large interest in entomology told me about the Zophobas morio. I keep the larvae in storage and I use a large plastic storage bin as their enclosure. Theoretically, with the number of worms (2,000) that I have, it should take them a year to consume 92 grams of styrofoam. I will just use the adult beetles for breeding and the only reason why adult beetles would stop breeding is that they have died. Thursday would be best for the photo. Best, Henri Emmet
Worms ate my coffee cup! and other Green Innovation Grants for 2019–20

Tuesday, February 25, 2020 4:36 pm

From plastic-eating worms to stapleless staplers, Bates' Green Innovation Grants support surprising — and surprisingly effective — sustainability projects.

Bates STEM faculty offer insights to students about coronavirus outbreak

Thursday, February 6, 2020 11:38 am

From perspectives of mathematics and microbiology, Bates professors guide students to better understanding of this winter's novel coronavirus.

2020 MLK Day Keynote AddressBiased: Uncovering the Hidden Prejudice That Shapes What We See, Think, and DoJennifer Lynn Eberhardt, Professor of Psychology, Stanford University.Jennifer Lynn Eberhardt of Stanford University gives the 2020 Martin Luther King Jr. Day keynote address at Bates. (Nana Kofi Nti)Jennifer Lynn Eberhardt of Stanford University gives the 2020 Martin Luther King Jr. Day keynote address at Bates. (Nana Kofi Nti)A social psychologist at Stanford, Eberhardt investigates the consequences of the psychological association between race and crime. Through interdisciplinary collaborations and a wide ranging array of methods — from laboratory studies to novel field experiments — Eberhardt has revealed the startling, and often dispiriting, extent to which racial imagery and judgments suffuse our culture and society, and in particular shape actions and outcomes within the domain of criminal justice.
‘I don’t know why I said that’: MLK Day keynote looks at hidden bias

Thursday, January 23, 2020 10:12 am

Biased author Jennifer Eberhardt's talk was rich in science, often sobering, yet ultimately uplifting.

Supervised by Holly Ewing, Christian A. Johnson Professor of Interdisciplinary Studies, environmental studies major Christopher Castaneda ’20 takes water samples from Lake Auburn. He’s studying nutrients produced by algae and consumed by other organisms in the lake. Related to the impacts of algae blooms on water quality, the research supports community efforts to deliver unfiltered public water at the lowest price. On the boat with Water treatment manager and lab director Chris Curtis (in blue shirt) and Lindsay Bates and Dan Fortin, water quality technicians (Bruins sweatshirt)
Bates scientist has pivotal role in $6 million project to better predict lake cyanobacterial blooms

Wednesday, October 23, 2019 9:06 am

Holly Ewing is integral to the National Science Foundation-funded project to use big data and robotics against the growing hazard of blue-green algae blooms.

Announcing Bobcat339: a student-invented molecule with pharmaceutical promise

Friday, October 4, 2019 11:33 am

Protected by a provisional patent filing, the molecule Bobcat339 speaks to pharmaceutical promise and how students become cutting-edge science researchers at Bates.

Slideshow: Osprey vs. goldfish at Lake Andrews

Thursday, September 12, 2019 10:00 am

Watch what happens when an osprey goes for the gold at Lake Andrews.

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