Stories about "Science and technology"
I am a philosophy major and I got the idea from a younger sibling who has a large interest in entomology told me about the Zophobas morio. I keep the larvae in storage and I use a large plastic storage bin as their enclosure. Theoretically, with the number of worms (2,000) that I have, it should take them a year to consume 92 grams of styrofoam. I will just use the adult beetles for breeding and the only reason why adult beetles would stop breeding is that they have died. Thursday would be best for the photo. Best, Henri Emmet
Worms ate my coffee cup! and other Green Innovation Grants for 2019–20

Tuesday, February 25, 2020 4:36 pm

From plastic-eating worms to stapleless staplers, Bates' Green Innovation Grants support surprising — and surprisingly effective — sustainability projects.

Bates STEM faculty offer insights to students about coronavirus outbreak

Thursday, February 6, 2020 11:38 am

From perspectives of mathematics and microbiology, Bates professors guide students to better understanding of this winter's novel coronavirus.

2020 MLK Day Keynote AddressBiased: Uncovering the Hidden Prejudice That Shapes What We See, Think, and DoJennifer Lynn Eberhardt, Professor of Psychology, Stanford University.Jennifer Lynn Eberhardt of Stanford University gives the 2020 Martin Luther King Jr. Day keynote address at Bates. (Nana Kofi Nti)Jennifer Lynn Eberhardt of Stanford University gives the 2020 Martin Luther King Jr. Day keynote address at Bates. (Nana Kofi Nti)A social psychologist at Stanford, Eberhardt investigates the consequences of the psychological association between race and crime. Through interdisciplinary collaborations and a wide ranging array of methods — from laboratory studies to novel field experiments — Eberhardt has revealed the startling, and often dispiriting, extent to which racial imagery and judgments suffuse our culture and society, and in particular shape actions and outcomes within the domain of criminal justice.
‘I don’t know why I said that’: MLK Day keynote looks at hidden bias

Thursday, January 23, 2020 10:12 am

Biased author Jennifer Eberhardt's talk was rich in science, often sobering, yet ultimately uplifting.

Supervised by Holly Ewing, Christian A. Johnson Professor of Interdisciplinary Studies, environmental studies major Christopher Castaneda ’20 takes water samples from Lake Auburn. He’s studying nutrients produced by algae and consumed by other organisms in the lake. Related to the impacts of algae blooms on water quality, the research supports community efforts to deliver unfiltered public water at the lowest price. On the boat with Water treatment manager and lab director Chris Curtis (in blue shirt) and Lindsay Bates and Dan Fortin, water quality technicians (Bruins sweatshirt)
Bates scientist has pivotal role in $6 million project to better predict lake cyanobacterial blooms

Wednesday, October 23, 2019 9:06 am

Holly Ewing is integral to the National Science Foundation-funded project to use big data and robotics against the growing hazard of blue-green algae blooms.

Announcing Bobcat339: a student-invented molecule with pharmaceutical promise

Friday, October 4, 2019 11:33 am

Protected by a provisional patent filing, the molecule Bobcat339 speaks to pharmaceutical promise and how students become cutting-edge science researchers at Bates.

Slideshow: Osprey vs. goldfish at Lake Andrews

Thursday, September 12, 2019 10:00 am

Watch what happens when an osprey goes for the gold at Lake Andrews.

“We are piloting the experiment for these students’ thesis experiments. They were piloting Hannah’s experiment. She’s interested in looking at the extent to which visual masking actually inhibits perception. So when you take a visual mask, you take an image followed by another image, you’re impaired at understanding the first image. The question is why. So what we’re going to do is take the neural activity that we’re measuring. And the nice thing about EEG is that it measures millisecond by millisecond electrical potentials that are generated in the brain , we measure them from the scalp. And we can see over time what the brain is processing and we use machine learning, we put these signals into a computer system tha t reads out the extent to which there is information about what the picture is. We’re wondering, does that information persist when you change the image? Does that persist over time? Hannah’s made the experiment, and we are going to try it out to make sure everything’s ready for participants.”? Michelle Greene, assistant professor of neuroscience, says of three thesis students in neuroscience: “They’re all terrific, I might add.”Hanna De Bruyn ‘18, Old Lyme, Conn. (black striped sweater with glasses)Katherine “Katie” Hartnett ’18 of St. Paul, Minn. (wearing EEG cap with Bates sweatshirt)Julie Self ’18 of Redwood City, Calif. (blue plaid shirt)Email from Hanna: Katie Harnett and I will be testing out our computational neuroscience theses and will be hooking each other up to the EEG tomorrow, Friday, at 12:45-2:30ish in the Bates Computational Vision Lab (Hathorn 108). 
Bates announces $3.97 million National Science Foundation grant for visual database project

Friday, August 16, 2019 11:02 am

The largest-ever federal grant awarded to Bates, the award will fuel creation of a vast video gallery to support research in various fields, including artificial intelligence.

Ryan Mahoney ’20 Virginia Tech, Environmental Resources Management, working with Maine Coast Heritage Trust which placed me with KELT (Kennebec Estuary Land Trust), posses for a portrait using his photne to lit himself while watching the cosmos from on top of "The Rock" overlooking Meetinghouse Pond at The Coastal Center at Shortridge on July 29, 2019. He states:"As for my little biography, I was born and raised in Reston, Virginia and have lived there my whole life. Now I am going into my senior year at Virginia Tech majoring in 'Environmental Resources Management' and getting minors in 'Forestry' and Watershed Management'. This Summer, I got the opportunity to work with Maine Coast Heritage Trust which placed me with KELT (Kennebec Estuary Land Trsust). I wanted this internship because I knew it would give me experiences in the field of environmental conservation that I otherwise would not have been able to have. Staying at Shortridge this Summer has been an absolute blessing and I will forever cherish my time here forever.""Growing up, I always loved to look at the night sky and stars. When there was a meteor shower or celestial event, my parents would wake me up in the middle of the night and drive me and my siblings out to a field where we could see the sky with the least amount of light pollution possible. Last night at Shortridge was my first time seeing a truly clear night sky with no light pollution and it was absolutely breathtaking. Words cannot do justice for what I saw last night. Looking up, I could see the whole Milky Way, more stars than imaginable, and even space stations or satellites floating in the endless wonder. Standing up on that rock and looking at the intricacies of the universe flushed me with feelings of wonder, astonishment, and excitement. Those moments are the moments I chase in life and I hope to see a sky like that again sometime soon."
Video: What can you see in the starry Maine sky on a summer night?

Wednesday, August 7, 2019 9:41 am

This time-lapse video, filmed at the college’s Coastal Center at Shortridge, kicks off with sun barreling toward the western horizon. Then the show begins.

NESCAC Heat Poll for July 20–21: Jumbos flip the script

Tuesday, July 23, 2019 12:32 pm

On the hottest two days of the hottest July on record, which NESCAC college were the toastiest?

Professor of Geology Beverly Johnson uses a sediment elevation table to measure the height of the Sprague River Salt Marsh, part of the Bates–Morse Mountain Conservation Area..These data are used to measure the response of the marsh to rising sea level and storm activity, Johnson says. Four years ago, she and her Short Term geology students traveled to the Sprague, where they placed rods deep in the marsh as benchmarks to measure future changes.Show with Laura Sewall (in garnet baseball cap), Harward Center for Community Partnerships, Director of Bates Morse Mountain Conservation Area, and Vanessa Paolella '21 of Dingmen's Ferry, Pa., who has been working with Johnson on geology research over the summer.Also present: Clailre Enterline (in green shirt and blue baseball cap), Research Coordinator with the Maine Coastal Program. And (not in selects but wearing a blue baseball cap and blue shirt) Ellen Bartow-Gieelie, Coastal Fellow with the Maine Coastal Program.
Q&A: Laura Sewall on 11 years as Bates–Morse Mountain director

Friday, July 19, 2019 10:30 am

Sewall shares takeaways from the conservation area, including the role of "blue carbon," the toll of climate change, and the value in letting nature take its course.

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