Courses

Courses

CHI 101. Beginning Chinese I.

An introduction to spoken and written modern Chinese. Conversation and comprehension exercises in the classroom and laboratory provide practice in pronunciation and the use of basic patterns of speech. Enrollment limited to 19. Normally offered every year. [AC] [CP] L. Miao, N. Faries.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

CHI 102. Beginning Chinese II.

A continuation of CHI 101 with increasing emphasis on the recognition of Chinese characters. By the conclusion of this course, students know more than one quarter of the characters expected of an educated Chinese person. Classes, conducted increasingly in Chinese, stress sentence patterns that facilitate both speaking and reading. Prerequisite(s): CHI 101. Normally offered every year. L. Miao.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

CHI 201. Intermediate Chinese I.

Designed to enable students to converse in everyday Chinese and to read simple texts in Chinese. Classes conducted primarily in Chinese aim at further development of overall language proficiency. Open to first-year students. Normally offered every year. [AC] [CP] L. Miao, Staff.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

CHI 202. Intermediate Chinese II.

A continuation of CHI 201. Prerequisite(s): CHI 201 Open to first-year students. Normally offered every year. L. Miao, N. Faries.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

AS/CI 207. Traditional Chinese Literature in Translation.

An exploration of Chinese literature through reading and discussion of some of its masterworks of poetry, drama, fiction, and belles-lettres prose from ancient times through the premodern era. Not open to students who have received credit for CHI 207. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 25. [W2] Normally offered every year. [AC] [HS] N. Faries.
Concentrations

AS/CI 223. Communism, Capitalism, and Cannibalism: New and Emerging Voices in Chinese Literature.

A survey of Chinese literature since 1911, including a wide range of fiction, poetry, and drama from mainland China and texts from the Chinese diaspora as well. Students gain a greater understanding of China's history and literary culture in three major periods: the May Fourth shift from traditional language and forms to vernacular literature; Socialist Realism and the Marxist theory of the first three decades of the People's Republic; and China's Reform Era, including expatriate authors like Ha Jin and China's two controversial Nobel Prize winners, Gao Xingjian and Moyan. Recommended background: AS/CI 207. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 39. Normally offered every year. N. Faries.
Concentrations

AS/CI 225. Art and Politics in China.

Winnie-the-Pooh is blocked on China's internet after memes appear of President Xi and the bear walking side-by-side. A Chinese artist is held without charges and then welcomed by foreign hosts into exile. The Western media clings to a narrative of Chinese art as authoritarian critique, but this is only one aspect of a complex relationship between art and politics in Chinese culture. What does "censorship" really mean? What are China’s mechanisms of control? Is there Chinese art that is neither dissent nor propaganda? This course considers these questions through close analysis of China’s visual arts, theater, and literary texts. Enrollment limited to 39. Normally offered every year. [AC] [HS] N. Faries.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

INDC 227. Death and Immortality in Chinese Tradition.

This course explores ideas and practices surrounding death in premodern China, including norms of burial, the afterlife, the concept of immortality and spirits and ghosts in Chinese religious and cultural traditions. Students scrutinize religious-philosophical writings, mortuary art, and literary works, asking the following questions: How did premodern Chinese perceive death and immortality? How did and should the knowledge that one is going to die affect the living? How did verbal and visual arts help to materialize the hope and illusion of immortality? How did death and immortality engage with political discourses? New course beginning winter 2020. Enrollment limited to 39. One-time offering. C. Ling.
Interdisciplinary Programs

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

CHI 301. Upper-Level Modern Chinese I.

Designed for students who already have a strong background in spoken Chinese, the course gives an intensive review of the essentials of grammar and phonology, introduces a larger vocabulary and a variety of sentence patterns, improves conversational and auditory skills, and develops some proficiency in reading and writing. The course makes extensive use of short texts (both literary and nonfictional) and some films. Classes are conducted primarily in Chinese. Open to first-year students. Normally offered every year. [AC] [CP] L. Miao, Staff.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

CHI 302. Upper-Level Modern Chinese II.

A continuation of CHI 301. Prerequisite(s): CHI 202. Open to first-year students. Normally offered every year. L. Miao, N. Faries.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

CHI 321. Chinese Landscape Painting and Poetry.

This interdisciplinary course examines the relationship between text and image. The Chinese literati’s practice of painting and writing provides an opportunity to understand the verbal-visual relationship within and eventually beyond the framework of representational theory. Students consider major Chinese literati who were prolific in both literary and artistic creations, such as Wang Wei (701-761), Su Shi (1037-1101), Ni Zan (1301-1374), and Dong Qichang (1555-1636). The course focuses on the landscape motif in visual and verbal arts. In addition to tracing the development of Chinese landscape painting and poetry, students also explore the related social discourses and artistic theories. Enrollment limited to 19. One-time offering. C. Ling.

CHI 360. Independent Study.

Students, in consultation with a faculty advisor, individually design and plan a course of study or research not offered in the curriculum. Course work includes a reflective component, evaluation, and completion of an agreed-upon product. Sponsorship by a faculty member in the program/department, a course prospectus, and permission of the chair are required. Students may register for no more than one independent study per semester. Normally offered every semester. Staff.

CHI 365. Special Topics.

Designed for the small seminar group of students who may have particular interests in areas of study that go beyond the regular course offerings. Periodic conferences and papers are required. Instructor permission is required. Staff.

CHI 401. Advanced Chinese I.

This course is designed to further enhance students' ability to understand and speak idiomatic Mandarin Chinese. Included are readings of modern and contemporary literary works, journalistic writings, and other nonliterary texts. Classical texts may also be studied upon students' request. Recommended background: three years or more of Chinese. Open to first-year students. Normally offered every year. [AC] [CP] Y. Liu, N. Faries.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

CHI 402. Advanced Chinese II.

A continuation of CHI 401. Prerequisite(s): CHI 302 or 401. Recommended background: three years of Chinese or more. Open to first-year students. Normally offered every year. N. Faries.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

CHI 415. Readings in Classical Chinese.

An intensive study of classical Chinese through reading selections of ancient literary, historical, and philosophical texts in the original, including excerpts from the Analects, the Mencius, Laozi, Zhuangzi, Shiji, Tang-Song prose, and poetry. Conducted in Chinese. Prerequisite(s): CHI 302 or 401. Open to first-year students. N. Faries.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

CHI 457. Senior Thesis.

An extended research project on a topic in Chinese literature, culture, or language utilizing some source materials in Chinese. Qualified students may, with approval of the Committee on Asian Studies, choose to write the thesis in Chinese. Students register for 457 in the fall semester or for 458 in the winter semester unless the committee gives approval for a two-semester project. Majors invited to pursue honors register for 457 and 458, contingent on the approval of the committee. [W3] Normally offered every year. Staff.
Interdisciplinary Programs

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

CHI 458. Senior Thesis.

An extended research project on a topic in Chinese literature, culture, or language utilizing some source materials in Chinese. Qualified students may, with approval of the Committee on Asian Studies, choose to write the thesis in Chinese. Students register for 457 in the fall semester or for 458 in the winter semester unless the committee gives approval for a two-semester project. Majors invited to pursue honors register for 457 and 458, contingent on the approval of the committee. [W3] Normally offered every year. Staff.
Interdisciplinary Programs

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

Short Term Courses

AS/CI s13. Literature and Culture of China.

Students explore several works of Chinese literature and film, then travel to sites in China to experience the connections between these texts and contemporary Chinese society. They read poetry about the Great Wall while standing on the Great Wall, live in the alleyway neighborhood where one of China's most famous fiction writers lived, read official and dissident narratives about Tian'anmen Square before walking on the same paving stones where protesters and patriots have gathered for decades. The course includes stays in three Chinese cities—Beijing, Xi'an, and Hong Kong—and is open to all students regardless of their Chinese language skills. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 15. Instructor permission is required. N. Faries.

CHI s21. Chinese Language, Culture, Health, and Chinese Traditional Medicine.

Students undertake four weeks of intensive Chinese language study while they gain knowledge in traditional Chinese medicine, focusing on rural health and healing in Kunming, Yunnan Province, China. Language courses focus on the rapid improvement of comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Lectures on traditional Chinese medicine address acupuncture, Moxibustion, and cupping. Students learn to make herbal tea and experience Chinese foot massage. These studies are complemented by field trips to famous historical sites including those in Beijing and Xian. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 15. L. Miao, N. Faries.

CHI s50. Independent Study.

Students, in consultation with a faculty advisor, individually design and plan a course of study or research not offered in the curriculum. Course work includes a reflective component, evaluation, and completion of an agreed-upon product. Sponsorship by a faculty member in the program/department, a course prospectus, and permission of the chair are required. Students may register for no more than one independent study during a Short Term. Normally offered every year. Staff.