A new addition to BatesNews, “Say What?” is an occasional roundup of what Bates folks are saying about this and that.


Leigh’s Handshake

“Leigh had the best handshake of all time. He was not a big guy, but he would make sure he had the upper hand when he shook your hand. It was something that I always really enjoyed. Just shaking his hand.”

— Men’s basketball head coach Jon Furbush ’05, remembering longtime financial aid director and official basketball scorer Leigh Campbell ’64, who died July 31

Leigh Campbell '64 in a familiar spot: at the scorer's table keeping the Bates scorebook for a men's basketball game, vs. Catholic University on Jan. 5, 2008. (Joe Gromelski '74)
Leigh Campbell ’64 in a familiar spot: at the scorer’s table, here keeping the book for a men’s basketball game vs. Catholic University on Jan. 5, 2008. (Joe Gromelski ’74)

Homing In

“It’s taught me what it really means to invest in the place one calls home.”

— Religious studies major Anna Maheu ’21 of New York City on her summer work, funded by the Bates Harward Center, with the Good Food Bus, a mobile market that brings locally sourced produce to Lewiston neighborhoods

"Living and working in the Lewiston community has taught me a lot about what it really means to invest in the place one calls home because I’ve had the opportunity to work so closely with individuals who have committed themselves to connecting community members to food, land, and each other.”

—Religious studies major Anna Maheu ’21 of New York City, photographed on Campus Avenue with the Good Food Bus, a mobile market that brings locally sourced produce to various neighborhoods.

Maheu’s Harward Summer Civic Fellowship with the Nutrition Center is funded through the Harward Center for Community Partnerships @harwardcenter.

A food security organization for food insecure and otherwise vulnerable families, the Nutrition Center’s integrated programs include urban community gardens, children’s gardening and cooking programs, cooking and nutrition education programs, youth leadership programs, food access initiatives, and a food pantry.

Maheu’s work this summer consists of supporting the Nutrition Centers various gardens throughout Lewiston-Auburn, maintaining educational gardens, assisting the food pantry in its efforts to adapt to COVID-19 through food deliveries, and the Good Food Bus.

Maheu’s hands-on experience, coupled with support provided by the Nutrition Center’s staff members, has provided her with a “ground-level look at the myriad ways that food justice and access is pursued,” she says, and “has reaffirmed how fundamental food and soil are to the lives we live, the power structures we must work against, and the relationships we cultivate.”

Thanks to the Nutrition Center, she also has had the chance to grow much of her own food this summer. “I will take these sustaining and sustainable capacities with me into my life after Bates.”
Religious studies major Anna Maheu ’21 of New York City. (Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College)

Learning to Fall

“I spent like two hours falling down. But for some reason, I loved it. I think I did because it was just so darn hard.”

— Two-time Nordic skiing Olympian and Bates’ first female All-American Nancy Ingersoll Fiddler ’78, speaking to the Bates Bobcast about her first time skiing at Bates

Nancy Ingersoll Fiddler ’78 skis for Bates in the 1970s. (Muskie Archives and Special Collections Library)

Two Words

“Our watchwords in putting together the whole semester have been ‘choice and flexibility.'”

— President Clayton Spencer, speaking on Maine Public Radio’s show Maine Calling with other presidents of Maine colleges about Bates’ approach to reopening for the fall 2020 semester, in which all students and faculty could choose to participate in-person or remotely


On the Dot
John Douglas ’60 in the 1960 Bates Mirror yearbook.

“I remember looking up, and I think there were about 15,000 people there. I remember seeing these red dots, all these guys smoking cigars. You had this haze of smoke and then these red dots all over the place. But that didn’t really stop you.”

— Men’s track and field legend John Douglas ’60 speaking to the Bates Bobcast about competing at Madison Square Garden, where he set the program’s indoor long jump record of 25 feet, 0.75 inches, which still stands


Centering the Problem

“I have a strong preference for the term ‘anti-racism’ over terms like ‘racial equity.’ Anti-racism centers the thing, it centers the problem, it centers the behavior, and it names the people who are responsible for fixing that behavior…. Anti-racism calls us to look at the very specific action, 400 years’ worth, that white folks need to grapple with and deconstruct.”

— Vice President for Equity and Inclusion Noelle Chaddock, speaking to Maine Public’s radio program Maine Calling on the meaningful actions can people take for racial justice

Vice President for Equity and InclusionOffice of Equity and Inclusion Noelle ChaddockOIE Winter Welcome BackWednesday, January 15th 4-6pmCheese & Crackers, Cookies & Coffee!Hello OIE Universe! Happy first day of classes! Our winter semester Welcome Back will be THIS Wednesday from 4-6pm. Come through and see everyone you missed over break, connect with the OIE, and eat some delicious snacks.
Vice President for Equity and Inclusion Noelle Chaddock. (Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College)

Contrary to the National Interest

“These new directives from ICE undercut our ability to educate students fully, cause unnecessary fear and anxiety, and run contrary to our national interest in positioning the U.S. as the higher education destination for talented and ambitious students from across the globe.”

— Vice President for Campus Life and Dean of Students Joshua McIntosh on the college’s response to guidance issued by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, since rolled back, with respect to the Student and Exchange Visitor Program and remote learning


To Do List

 “I’m not sure they miss school per se, but they’re itching to do things. They are incredibly eager to put their minds to work and spend time outside around others.”

— Politics major Georgia Moses ’21 of Arlington, Mass., on her summer work, funded by the Bates Harward Center for Community Partnerships, with children at Hillview Family Development, a public housing community in Lewiston

Children's art programming and St. Mary's Nutrition Center Gardening at Hillview Housing in Lewiston.


"Many of the kids I'm working with haven’t participated in activities in a structured way since March. I’m learning that they are incredibly eager to put their minds to work and spend time outside around others. I’m not sure they miss school per se, but they’re itching to do things. It's been exciting to watch and has made the project successful.”

—Politics major Georgia Moses ’21 of Arlington, Mass., working with Hillview Family Development, a public housing community in Lewiston that provides affordable housing and a variety of resources for the families that live there.

Moses’ Harward Summer Civic Fellowship with Hillview Family Development is funded through the Harward Center for Community Partnerships @harwardcenter.

She’s developing and leading socially-distanced art programming with children at Hillview. “I’ve learned that working with kids during a pandemic is a challenge. I’ve had to set a lot of ground rules in order for the programming to run smoothly and safely, from distancing to mask wearing to hand sanitizing. That said, I’ve been really impressed by the level of understanding these kids have. They clearly know the importance of keeping themselves and their communities safe and healthy.”

Moses is also planning for Bates student engagement in the fall. “I’m workshopping ways in which Bates students can work with kids at Hillview remotely, as this year will look very different from years prior.”
Politics major Georgia Moses ’21 of Arlington, Mass. (Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College)
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