Stories about "Current topics"
For Chip Noble ’97, Trek Across Maine is a family affair

Monday, April 15, 2019 10:19 am

Noble, a senior product manager at Garmin, makes the maps for each year's Trek. And this year, he's riding it with his two daughters.

Exacting, empathetic, authentic: Kelley-Romano receives Kroepsch teaching award

Thursday, April 11, 2019 2:17 pm

She's known off campus for research on campaign rhetoric and alien abduction stories, but her students love her for keeping things real.

“It was rewarding to start as a kind of blank slate and work my way to where I am now.”.— Ben Lyons ’19, an economics major from San Rafael, Calif., posing in front of the dramatic Nasdaq MarketSite overlooking New York City’s Times Square..Lyons is concluding a 10-week Purposeful Work internship at Nasdaq Private Market with the company’s head, Eric Folkemer ’02..Working on a long-term project under the guidance of Nasdaq Private Market staff, Lyons has gained practical understanding of data analysis, financial documents, and Nasdaq trading and technology. In the spirit of Purposeful Work, the experience has helped Lyons both explore and refine his interest in finance.
Bates-Gallup study finds ‘purpose gap’ between what college graduates seek and find in their work

Thursday, April 11, 2019 2:14 pm

The new study also suggests that Bates Purposeful Work offers ways that colleges and universities might better prepare students for the future of work.

Tales of wayward trustees and lost telegrams from Bates’ founding trustee meeting

Thursday, April 4, 2019 4:38 pm

When you're launching a new college, as Oren Cheney was doing on this day in 1855, you sweat the details, you don’t suffer fools, and you watch your money.

Student research reveals China’s uneasy embrace of video gaming, hip-hop music

Tuesday, April 2, 2019 1:42 pm

Can "positive energy and socialist values" co-exist with Western pop culture? A Mount David Summit session takes a look.

To address today’s problems, look to Ella Baker, says scholar-activist Barbara Ransby

Thursday, March 28, 2019 4:19 pm

In her postponed Martin Luther King Jr. Day keynote, the renowned historian helps us parlay lessons of the past into a brighter future.

Students bring new analytical, visual skills to busting fake news

Thursday, March 28, 2019 12:50 pm

The bull is in their court as students in a new digital studies course learn to discern real facts from fake.

Jennifer Doudna, pioneer and leading public voice of CRISPR gene-editing research, to deliver 2019 Commencement Address, joined by honorands Dolores Huerta, Travis Mills, and Megan Smith

Wednesday, March 27, 2019 9:12 am

An internationally renowned biochemist, Doudna is a leading public voice in the emerging discussion of the societal and ethical implications of CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing technology.

In 1940, pilot Catherine Winne ’41 was the first Bates female student to take to the skies

Friday, March 22, 2019 11:17 am

In 1940, Winne learned to fly through a civilian pilot training program that was also about preparing for war.

Visiting Assistant Professors of Economics Kurzfeld's class on"Crime, Punishment and Rehabilitation" attended by Joyce Vance , where she participated in a panel. She talked about the work she did on penal reform in Alabama when she was the US Attorney for the Northern District. From Kurzfeld:The class on Thursday meets in Pettingill G50 at 1:10. The other two members of the panel are Joseph Jackson, Director of the Maine Prisoner's Advocacy Coalition, and Jesse Archer, a local defense attorney. Joseph is an African American man who was incarcerated in Maine State Prison for 20 years, including time in solitary confinement. He founded the first chapter of the NAACP in the Maine prison system, was the first inmate in the MSP to complete a Master's degree while incarcerated, and has since his release become a leading advocate for improved conditions for prisoners in Maine. He also works with the Maine Inside Out program, which uses theater to help incarcerated youth find their voice and their place in their communities. Jesse Archer is a criminal defense attorney who has been very interested in the racial inequities he has observed in his work in the local courts, including the racial disparities in jury representation, among other issues.She will speak tonight on The Mueller Investigation and the Rule of Law: A talk by Joyce White Vance ’82, Distinguished Professor of the Practice of Law, Culverhouse School of Law, University of Alabama. Vance is a former U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Alabama and frequent legal commentator for MSNBC. An entry in the Harward Center for Community Partnerships’ Theory Into Practice series. FMI 207-786-6202.Muskie Archives
Joyce White Vance ’82: Whatever Mueller report says, rule of law stands strong

Friday, March 22, 2019 10:30 am

As the mythical Mueller report looms, MSNBC's go-to special counsel explainer brings Bates up to speed.

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