Stories about "Maine and New England"
Video: An immersive visit to the coastal gem, Bates–Morse Mountain Conservation Area

Friday, September 2, 2022 1:10 pm

Time spent in nature is great. Time spent even looking at images of nature help, too. With that in mind, here’s a brief but enveloping video from Bates–Morse Mountain on a summer day.

Blown ashore on the Maine coast, Bates geology students were blown away by their magical visits with artist Ashley Bryan

Thursday, February 10, 2022 2:23 pm

Whike kayaking the Maine coast in May 2014, geology professor Dyk Eusden '80 and his students were blown off course — and into the welcoming an magical world of artist Ashley Bryan, who died last week at age 98.

Video: Essie Martin ’22, a budding scientist-activist fighting climate change, one kelp at a time

Thursday, February 10, 2022 10:08 am

One day, the little girl announced to her kindergarten teacher, “I want...

Video: Maya Benziger ’22, from hesitation to the ‘full nine yards’

Friday, January 21, 2022 9:44 am

After a year and a half of COVID-cancelled a cappella performances, Maya Benziger '22 realized there was more at stake than just singing on stage: the entire pre-pandemic Merimander experience could disappear with her graduating class, and she realized, "I didn't want that to end with me."

Clay play: Learn about the stubborn and slick earth beneath Bates

Wednesday, February 24, 2021 4:45 pm

Bates and Maine have a historic love-hate relationship with marine clay, aka the Presumpscot Formation.

Prof of Environmental Studies and Christian A. Johnson Prof of Interdisc Studies Holly Ewing and Lecturer in Environmental Studies & Learning Associate in Environmental Studies Camille Parrish take students in the Soils/Lab course for a field trip to Pettengill Farm in Freeport, Maine. A nineteenth century salt-water farm on the estuary of the Harraseeket River, the farm is owned by Freeport Historical Society(FHS). It includes a saltbox house (ca. 1800) on 140 acres of fields, woods, antique apple orchards and salt marsh. Most interesting are the etchings (sgraffitti) found on the plaster walls in the upper chambers of ships, sea monsters, longboats and animals. The farmhouse remains without plumbing, central heat and electricity and is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. Mildred Pettengill was its last resident and lived in the house until 1970.The students are digging up soil and making observations (soil profiles) before putting it back where it came from.ENVR 310 - Soils/LabDepending on one's point of view, soils are geological units, ecosystems, the foundation of plant life, a place for microbes to live, building material, or just dirt. This course takes a scientific perspective and explores the genesis of soils, their distribution and characteristics, and their interaction with plants. Field studies emphasize description of soils, inferences about soil formation, and placement within a landscape context. Labs investigate the chemistry of soils and their role in forestry and agriculture.
Bates students dig into the science of dirt in a historic Maine landscape

Monday, December 7, 2020 5:46 pm

Bates environmental studies professor Holly Ewing guides her students to historic coastal Maine farmland for course that digs into the science of dirt.

Zoe Knauss '23 of Buffalo, N.Y., who will declare as an ES major, and ES major Sam Gilman '22 of Mendham, N.J., , dig for soil in a field.Prof of Environmental Studies and Christian A. Johnson Prof of Interdisc Studies Holly Ewing and Lecturer in Environmental Studies & Learning Associate in Environmental Studies Camille Parrish take students in the Soils/Lab course for a field trip to Pettengill Farm in Freeport, Maine. A nineteenth century salt-water farm on the estuary of the Harraseeket River, the farm is owned by Freeport Historical Society(FHS). It includes a saltbox house (ca. 1800) on 140 acres of fields, woods, antique apple orchards and salt marsh. Most interesting are the etchings (sgraffitti) found on the plaster walls in the upper chambers of ships, sea monsters, longboats and animals. The farmhouse remains without plumbing, central heat and electricity and is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. Mildred Pettengill was its last resident and lived in the house until 1970.The students are digging up soil and making observations (soil profiles) before putting it back where it came from.ENVR 310 - Soils/LabDepending on one's point of view, soils are geological units, ecosystems, the foundation of plant life, a place for microbes to live, building material, or just dirt. This course takes a scientific perspective and explores the genesis of soils, their distribution and characteristics, and their interaction with plants. Field studies emphasize description of soils, inferences about soil formation, and placement within a landscape context. Labs investigate the chemistry of soils and their role in forestry and agriculture.
Picture story: “Thankful to get off campus and my hands dirty”

Thursday, October 8, 2020 4:01 pm

Follow along as Bates environmental studies students go off campus and dig into the science of dirt at a stunning coastal Maine site.

Slideshow: See how students’ internships become life-guiding forces

Tuesday, August 18, 2020 12:30 pm

From studying the diets of sea urchins to working with Lewiston's immigrant communities, Bates students forged their way into the world this summer with Bates-funded internships.

Truman Scholar Essie Martin ’21 looks to create sustainable fishing and communities

Thursday, June 4, 2020 1:01 pm

Good policy, Martin says, stems from good science — and giving everyone a seat at the table.

This Month in Bates Outing Club History: Video from the 1936 Winter Carnival

Thursday, February 27, 2020 4:19 pm

If a sporting event could be done on bare ground, Bates students were probably trying it on skis, skates, and snowshoes during Winter Carnival.

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