BatesNews monthly update: September 2011

For Bates alumni, parents and friends, here is a look back at stories that represent some of the major Bates events and achievements of the past month, important upcoming events, and a sampling of Bates people in the news.


In this issue:

1. McCann ’77, Raths ’96 and Rossello join Board of Trustees

2. James Carignan ’61, dean emeritus of the college, dies at 72

3. David Aschauer, Campbell Professor of Economics, dies at 58

4. Orientation express: the kickoff for Bates’ academic year

5. Behind-the-scenes tales of campus doings on eve of Orientation

6. Five alumni earn Fulbrights to teach and study worldwide

7. Meet new professors in politics, English, education

8. Award-winning nature poet to present Otis Lecture

9. Journalism students help break Maine dam-safety story

10. Spelman president to discuss racial identity development

11. Bates annual giving posts robust gains in 2011

12. Olin Arts Center celebrates 25 years in October

13. Bates in the News


1. McCann ’77, Raths ’96 and Rossello join board of trustees

The Bates Board of Trustees recently elected Dr. Dervilla M. McCann ’77, a cardiologist and partner with Androscoggin Cardiology Associates and Maine Research Associates in Auburn, Maine; Barbara M. Raths ’96 of Portland, deputy treasurer of the state of Maine; and John T. Rossello Jr. of Holliston, Mass., a former partner with PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP.


2. James Carignan ’61, dean emeritus of the college, dies at 72

Dean Emeritus of the College James W. Carignan ’61, praised as an educator, innovator and civic leader whose legacy is “permanently etched upon the fabric of Bates,” died Aug. 14 at age 72 following a long battle with heart and renal disease.


3. David Aschauer, Campbell Professor of Economics, dies at 58

David Aschauer, a Bates economics professor known nationally for research illustrating the economic stimulus provided by government spending on public infrastructure, died Aug. 22. Funeral services are Saturday, Sept. 17, in Brunswick, and the reception follows at Bates.


4. Text, multimedia and video about Orientation and Convocation

All about the opening of the Bates academic year, from quick-thinking AESOP leaders who planned around the arrival of Tropical Storm Irene to the challenge given to the Class of 2015 at Convocation to understand, and redefine, the social norms that guide us through life.


5. Nine behind-the-scenes stories about new-year preparations

Right before Orientation for the Class of 2015, we did a campus walkabout to check on final preparations for the new academic year from veterans like Sanford Freedman and James Reese and newcomers like Mara Tieken and TherĂ­ Pickens. A theme emerged: The more things stay the same, the more they change.


6. Five alumni earn Fulbrights to teach and study worldwide

The federal Fulbright Program has awarded grants for teaching and research in Argentina, China, Germany and Spain to five Bates College alumni.


7. Meet new professors in politics, English, education

Bates’ commitment to social justice, its stated values of diversity and equity, and its innovative teaching were all factors that drew three scholars to join the faculty for the 2011-12 academic year.


8. Award-winning nature poet to present Otis Lecture

Camille Dungy, an award-winning environmental poet and editor of the first anthology of nature poetry by African American writers, presents one of the college’s signature lectures, the Otis Lecture, on Oct. 6. Dungy is the author of Smith Blue, a collection of poems that explore, with fury and tenderness, the countless ways in which we invite and suffer from catastrophe.


9. Journalism students help break Maine dam-safety story

Short Term journalism students played a crucial role in a widely distributed news story, prepared by the Maine Center for Public Interest Reporting, about 93 potentially hazardous dams in Maine.


10. Spelman president to discuss racial identity development and college communities

Beverly Daniel Tatum, president of Spelman College and author of the book Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria?, visits Bates Sept. 16 to discuss her work in racial identity development and its impact on campus communities. The event, sponsored by the Office of Intercultural Education, begins a fall series of public events that include visits by theatrical director and teacher Ozzie Jones ’92; author Danzy Senna, author of Caucasia and Symptomatic; Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times reporter Andrea Elliott; and noted photographer Dawoud Bey.


11. Bates annual giving posts robust gains in 2011

Bates annual giving posted robust gains in the 2011 fiscal year, ending June 30, as donors to the Bates Fund contributed a record $5,503,676, exceeding the fund’s $5.5 million goal. Alumni participation hit 45.2 percent, exceeding the 45 percent goal.


12. Olin Arts Center celebrates 25 years in October

On Oct. 11, 1986, then-Dean of the Faculty Carl Benton Straub spoke at the dedication of then-new Olin Arts Center, predicting that countless “moments of discovery and self-discovery” would occur in Olin, and that the building would be a “workshop for new worlds.” Straub’s hopes have long since has passed into truth, good enough reason for the 25th anniversary party and open house at Olin Arts Center on Oct. 8., featuring New York’s avant-garde marching band, Asphalt Orchestra.


13. Bates in the News

The Independent describes entrepreneur John Buckman ’91 as “man without borders” who is fiercely “campaigning for freedom on the Internet.” A Chronicle of Philanthropy essay by David Campbell ’83 looks at the lessons of 9/11 fundraising, specifically how established and new charities could complement each other and together solve “seemingly insurmountable problems.” The Sun Journal talks to the five first-year students from Lewiston and Auburn high schools about their choice of Bates.

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