Events

November 2017


> November 1, 2017, Wednesday

4:15 pm in Pettengill G65

“Fission, Forking and Fine Tuning: What kinds of organizational structures promote technological  innovation?” presented by  Professor Richard Langlois  from the University of Connecticut, USA, and University of the Witwatersrand Johannesburg, South Africa.

He will argue that successful innovation requires a match between the structure of the technology and the structure of what organizational economists call decision rights.  I illustrate this point with a case study of three generations of a family of inventor-entrepreneurs in electricity and electronics.

All are welcome to attend.  (Sponsored by The Casey Lecture Fund for Economics.)

> November 7, 2017, Tuesday
4:15 pm in Pettengill G65

“Labor Market Polarization in Britain and Germany: A Cross-National Comparison Using Longitudinal Household Data” presented by Xiupeng Wang, PhD Candidate from the University of Connecticut. Come and hear about his study that used data from Britain and Germany to investigate how mid-wage workers responded to the declining wage due to the increasing adoption of information technology.

All are welcome to attend. (Sponsored by The Casey Lecture Fund for Economics.)

> November 28, 2017, Tuesday
4:15 pm in Pettengill G65

“Job Separation Risk and Home Ownership: Evidence from Assistant Professors” a talk given by Stephen Morris, Assistant Professor of Economics from Bowdoin College.  Since expected mobility is one of the most important factors affecting the home purchase decision, Prof. Morris will explore the unique setting of the academic job market with characteristics that provide measurable, exogenous variation in ex ant moving rates due to institution-specific promotion-and-tenure probabilities.

All are welcome to attend. (Sponsored by the Casey Lecture Fund for Economics.)

December 2017

 

> December 5, 2017, Tuesday
4:15 pm in Pettengill G65

TBA – talk given by Samarth Gupta (PhD candidate from Boston University).