Courses

Courses
HISP 103. Elementary Spanish.
Designed for students with minimal experience in Spanish or another Romance language and for highly self-motivated students who wish to begin Spanish, the course introduces essential constructions and vocabulary. The course emphasizes oral proficiency and the development of reading and writing skills while fostering a cross-cultural understanding of the Spanish-speaking world with authentic texts and media. Not open to juniors or seniors. Not open to students who have received credit for HISP 101 or 102, or SPAN 103. Enrollment limited to 22. [AC] Staff.
HISP 201. Intermediate Spanish I.
Designed to increase students' vocabulary and improve foundational skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing. The course provides a thorough review of grammar acquired at the elementary level and expands that knowledge. The course emphasizes conversational proficiency, expository writing, and knowledge of the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world. Prerequisite(s): HISP 103 or through placement exam. Not open to students who have received credit for SPAN 201. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 22. Normally offered every year. [AC] Staff.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

HISP 202. Intermediate Spanish II.
Intensive practice in reading, composition, and conversation, as well as attention to selected grammar problems. The course focuses on discussion through visual presentations and selections of literature, art, and culture of the Spanish-speaking world. Prerequisite(s): HISP 201 or through placement exam. Not open to students who have received credit for SPAN 202. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 22. Normally offered every year. [AC] Staff.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

HISP 205. Advanced Spanish.
This course develops advanced skill in reading and writing as well as oral fluency and aural acuity through classroom activities and written assignments based on literary and nonliterary texts and audiovisual media. It introduces analytical and interpretative strategies necessary to engage and decode the breadth and variety of cultural productions originating in the Spanish-speaking world. Not open to students returning from off-campus study in a Spanish-speaking country. Not open to seniors. Prerequisite(s): HISP 202 or through placement exam. Not open to students who have received credit for SPAN 205. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 19. Normally offered every semester. [AC] [HS] Staff.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

HISP 210. Writing Spanish.
This course teaches skills useful for writing in upper-level courses, the senior thesis, or the senior portfolio. Students develop the ability to be flexible and versatile writers in Spanish in a variety of forms of academic writing (narrative, descriptive, expositive, argumentative) and learn the importance of the writing process (drafting, revision, rewriting, editing). The course expands students' understanding of research and writing as tools for creating and communicating knowledge of the Spanish-speaking world by encouraging them to use Spanish to ask, research, and answer questions of significance and importance. Prerequisite(s): HISP 205. Not open to seniors. Not open to students who have received credit for SPAN 210. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 25. [W2] Normally offered every year. [AC] [HS] Staff.
HISP 211. Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis.
In this course students learn the basic tools, concepts, and terminology of textual analysis. They become familiar with recent critical approaches to the study of modern Spanish and Spanish American literary and cultural work. Prerequisite(s): HISP 205 or 210. Not open to seniors. Not open to students who have received credit for SPAN 211. Enrollment limited to 25. Normally offered every year. [AC] [CP] Staff.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

HISP 222. Short Narrative in the Spanish-speaking World.
This course considers the development, functions, and varieties of short narrative in the Spanish-speaking world. Students examine the thematic content of stories in light of sociohistorical contexts, and explore the evolution of the elements and language of story-telling in terms of categories of literary periodization. Prerequisite(s): HISP 210 or 211. Not open to seniors. Not open to students who have received credit for SPAN 222. Enrollment limited to 29. [AC] Staff.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

HISP 224. Protest and Justice.
At different times and in different countries, many writers, filmmakers, and other artists from the Spanish-speaking world have felt compelled to create works that confront various types of social injustice. These range from the effects of imperialism to political repression, and often address issues of race, sexuality, gender, and class. In this course students analyze these "texts" within their respective social, political, and historical contexts. Prerequisites(s): HISP 210 or 211. Not open to seniors. Not open to students who have received credit for SPAN 224. Enrollment limited to 25. [AC] [HS] Staff.
Concentrations
HISP 228. Screen and Media.
This course examines the complex relationship between literature and screen media in terms of 1) the representative possibilities and limits each offer for the exploration and projection of relevant social, political, and cultural issues and 2) the processes, through study of different theoretical and aesthetic approaches, creators use to adapt works from one mode to the other. Through the analysis of literary and audiovisual productions from Latin America, Spain, and the United States, students engage the theoretical, technical, and practical debates among institutions, producers, and consumers that emerge in the process of transposing discourse across media forms. Prerequisite(s): HISP 210 or 211. Not open to seniors. Not open to students who have received credit for SPAN 228. Enrollment limited to 39. [AC] [CP] Staff.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

HISP 230. Readings in Spanish American and Spanish Caribbean Literature.
Students engage representative texts from Spanish American and Caribbean literatures from myths of origin in the pre-conquest period to the mid-twentieth century. The course examines the chronicles of conquest that set the tone for ongoing debates on the processes of coloniality. Through period texts, students consider debates on intellectual autonomy; regional and national identities; and the rights of indigenous people, African descendants, and women in the new nations of the nineteenth century. The course ends with an emphasis on literatures that explore divergent gendered, sexual, racial, and political viewpoints. The course is a multi-genre review that includes essay, chronicle, poetry, and testimony. Prerequisite(s): HISP 210 or 211. Not open to seniors. Not open to students who have received credit for SPAN 230. Enrollment limited to 39. Normally offered every year. [AC] [CP] Staff.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

HISP 231. Readings in Spanish Literature.
What are the points of convergence and divergence between Spain and Europe? How has Spain articulated itself as European? How and by what motives has Spain emphasized its differences vis-à-vis Europe? In this course, students consider these questions by reading representative literary works by Spanish writers from all periods in light of the European context in which they were crafted. Students pay special attention to how broad, sweeping historical processes that stand as markers of European identity, such as wars, revolutions, and cultural and philosophical movements, are reflected in Spanish literature. Central themes include religion and expansion, modern monarchies and the making of the "people," the invention of the nation and the ideal citizen, and postcolonial disorders. Prerequisite(s): HISP 210 or 211. Not open to seniors. Not open to students who have received credit for SPAN 231. Enrollment limited to 39. Normally offered every year. [AC] [CP] Staff.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

HS/LL 302. Minor Subjects: Childhood and Adolescence in Latin American Film and Literature.
In recent years, film and literature from across the globe have been increasingly interested in childhood experiences and perspectives. Contesting popular beliefs that childhood is an innocent and apolitical experience, Latin American film and literature have depicted the child figure both as a complex, agentic character and as a site of tension for issues of race, class, gender, and national politics. This course conceptualizes global theories on childhood studies in conversation with the historical, political, and social realities with which authors and filmmakers engage through stories of childhood experiences. Only open to juniors and seniors. Prerequisite(s): HISP 211. Recommended background: HISP 224. Not open to students who have received credit for HS/LS 302. Enrollment limited to 15. S. Pridgeon.
AS/HS 303. Phillippine Literature in Spanish.
This course interrogates the status of the Spanish language and literature written in Spanish in the Philippines from 1873 to 1945. Through the study of foundational works by the late nineteenth-century Ilustrados, it explores how Spanish came to be a vehicle for movements of resistance and rebellion against 400 years of Spain’s colonial domination of the archipelago. In novels, poetry, and essays by writers of the so-called Golden Age, it examines how Spanish persisted under the U.S. colonial occupation (1898–1945) to contest the imposition of English and Anglophone culture, and to cultivate a sense of Filipino nationhood alongside literary revivals of indigenous languages such as Tagalog, Cebuano, and Chavacano. Readings include works by Pedro Paterno, José Rizal, Jesús Balmori, Adelina Gurrea and María Paz Mendoza, among others. Only open to juniors and seniors. Prerequisite(s): one 200-level Hispanic studies course beyond 211. Recommended background: HISP 230 and 231. Enrollment limited to 15. [AC] [HS] D. George.
HS/LL 318. Next Year in Havana: Stories of the Jewish and Latinx Diaspora in the United States.
This course considers literature authored by Jewish and Latinx-identifying authors writing from the United States and explores Jewishness as imagined by Latinx authors. Students examine the construction of intersecting Jewish and Latinx identities and experiences. Particular attention is paid to how Latinx ethnicities are constructed differentially throughout the Americas and how narratives of ethno-national identities (racial democracy in Brazil, Calibanism in Cuba, and the cosmic race in Mexico), particularly their spiritual implications, come into contact with both Jewishness as an ethnicity and Judaism as a religion. Taught in English. Recommended background: HISP 211 or a literature course in ethnic studies. Open only to juniors and seniors. Not open to students who have received credit for LS/SP 318. Enrollment limited to 15. (English: Race, Ethnicity, or Diasporic Literature.) S. Pridgeon.
INDC 321. Afroambiente: Escritura negra y medio ambiente.
This course studies the response of black writers and intellectuals of the Spanish-speaking world to issues related to the natural environment. In several countries, including Colombia, Ecuador, Puerto Rico, and Equatorial Guinea, from colonial times to the present, modernity has brought serious challenges to notions of economic progress, human rights, and national sovereignty as well as individual and communal identity. Course materials include written texts from local newspapers and magazines as well as other sources of information such as websites that present issues related to the environment and the arts. All readings are in English. Taught in Spanish. Cross-listed in Africana, environmental studies, Hispanic studies, and Latin American and Latinx studies. Prerequisite(s): one 200-level Hispanic studies course above 211. Only open to juniors and seniors. Enrollment limited to 15. (Africana: Diaspora.) [AC] [HS] B. Fra-Molinero.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

HS/LL 325. Weaving Memory and Trauma: Contemporary Spanish American Novel.
The contemporary Spanish American novel that engages historical political violence does so from an intimate, textured view of memory and trauma. The memory and experience are entwined within recognizable but revised forms of fiction to accommodate voices in tension, while a cohesive plot shapes and allows for the questioning of memory placement and the articulation of trauma. Contrary to the “gran novelas” of the twentieth century, the contemporary novel textures violence by integrating voices that question ideological pronouncements of the twentieth century. Prerequisite(s): one 200-level Hispanic studies course above 211. Recommended background: HISP 230. Not open to students who have received credit for HS/LS 325. Enrollment limited to 15. [AC] C. Aburto Guzmán.
GS/HS 327. Gendered Experiences in the Américas Borderlands.
Students become acquainted with film, comics, music, fiction and nonfiction narratives that engage border tensions and issues of immigration in English and Spanish. Concepts such as sense of place, mobility, and permanence; histories of place; place of enunciation; transnational historical memory of migration; and transnational historical networks are utilized as critical lenses to analyze gendered experiences of migration. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite(s): one 200-level Hispanic studies course above HISP 211. Only open to juniors and seniors. Recommended background: HISP 230. Not open to students who have received credit for GS/SP 323 or 327. Enrollment limited to 15. C. Aburto Guzmán.
Concentrations
HS/LL 341. Lectura americana de Cervantes.
A present-day reading in America of Don Quijote de La Mancha and other key texts of the Spanish and Spanish American Renaissance. This course examines themes of Islamophobia, white supremacy, conquest and empire, the slave trade, the quest for utopias, and the construction of historical narratives that shape the politics of the day. Students analyze myths and legends of the marvelous real such as the fountain of youth in Florida, the island of California, the return to the Golden Age, fabulous cities and unbelievable real ones (Mexico-Tenochtitlan, Cuzco) that are admired and destroyed, and a fake island in Louisiana called Barataria. Students consider issues that obsessed people in Cervantes' time: the expulsion of Muslims, hatred of Jews, war, gender roles and women's freedom, mental and physical disability, and changes to the environment in the form of windmills. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite(s): one 200-level Hispanic studies course above HISP 211. Recommended background: HISP 231. Only open to juniors and seniors. Enrollment limited to 15. [AC] [HS] B. Fra-Molinero.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

GS/HS 344. Gendering Social Awareness in Contemporary Spain.
In this course, students use gender as the main category of analysis, paying particular attention to its interconnectedness with power. Carefully examining texts written by women in contemporary Spain, students explore the deliberate use of gender as a lens through which to understand different forms of domination—economic, political, and social. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite(s): one 200-level Hispanic studies course above HISP 211. Recommended background: HISP 231. Only open to juniors and seniors. Not open to students who have received credit for GS/SP 344. Enrollment limited to 15. Instructor permission is required. [AC] [HS] F. López.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

HISP 360. Independent Study.
Students, in consultation with a faculty advisor, individually design and plan a course of study or research not offered in the curriculum. Course work includes background research, a reflective component, evaluation, and completion of an agreed-upon product. Sponsorship by a faculty member in the department, a course prospectus, and permission of the chair are required. Students may register for no more than one independent study per semester. Staff.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

HISP 362. Culture in Franco Spain.
Through the analysis of literary texts and popular culture, this course focuses on the impact of ideology on cultural production in Spain from the 1930s to the 1970s. Students pay particular attention to representations of the nation in terms of time (history) and space (national isolation/international connections), and examine how censorship and dissent shaped the form and content of cultural products in Franco's Spain. Prerequisite(s): one 200-level Hispanic studies literature course. Recommended background: HISP 231. Only open to juniors and seniors. Not open to students who have received credit for SPAN 362. Enrollment limited to 15. [AC] [HS] F. López.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

INDC 382. Latinx Film.
This course introduces students to the field of Latinx studies through the lens of Latinx representations in United States film. By analyzing various films that feature Latinx characters, actors, and stories, students learn about the diversity of the Latinx population in the United States and develop an understanding of the key sociopolitical issues Latinx individuals face. Through the medium of film, themes such as immigration, gender, ethnicity and race, and the policing of Brown bodies gives students a more nuanced understanding of the largest growing minority population in the United States while also providing them the terms and skills necessary for audiovisual analysis. Taught in English. Cross-listed in American studies, Hispanic studies, and Latin American and Latinx studies. Only open to juniors and seniors. Recommended background: AM/AN 207, AMST 200, HISP 228, LL/PT 208, or RFSS 120. Enrollment limited to 15. [AC] L. Fernandez.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

INDC 390. Afro-Latinoamérica.
The 500-year presence of Africans and their descendants in the Spanish-speaking world has produced a significant body of literature by Blacks and about Blacks. Spanish America was the main destination of the African diaspora. Writers of African descent attest to the struggle for freedom and the abolition of slavery as well as anti-colonialism. Their literature shows how the participation of Blacks in the wars of Latin American independence was a struggle for their emancipation. Afro-Hispanic writers in Spain, the Americas, and Africa use their art and ideas to address the postnational migrations of the twenty-first century, a diaspora that has not ceased. Cross-listed in Africana, Hispanic studies, and Latin American and Latinx studies. Recommended background: AFR 100. Only open to juniors and seniors. Enrollment limited to 15. (Africana: Diaspora.) (Africana: Historical Perspective.) [AC] [HS] B. Fra-Molinero.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

HISP 457. Senior Thesis.
A capstone project, which may take the form of a written research paper, literary or cultural analysis, translation project, creative project, or digital portfolio, designed in consultation with the faculty advisor. Students register for HISP 457 in the fall semester. Majors writing an honors thesis register for both HISP 457 and 458. A detailed outline and bibliography must be approved by the department. [W3] Normally offered every year. Staff.
HISP 458. Senior Thesis.
A continuation of HISP 457. Majors writing an honors thesis register for both HISP 457 and 458. [W3] Normally offered every year. Staff.
Short Term Courses
HISP s50. Independent Study.
Students, in consultation with a faculty advisor, individually design and plan a course of study or research not offered in the curriculum. Course work includes a background research reflective component, evaluation, and completion of an agreed-upon product. Sponsorship by a faculty member in the department, a course prospectus, and permission of the chair are required. Students may register for no more than one independent study during a Short Term. Staff.