Campus events, revised: March 9–31, 2018

Assistant Professor of Theater Timothy Dugan directs the stage classic Angels in America: Millennium Approaches in performances through March 12. (Theophil Syslo/Bates College)

Hello from Bates!

This is an updated listing of public events at the college during March 2018.

The public is invited to these events. Except as noted, admission is free.

Updated in this edition:

  • Zen meditation services led by Heiku Jaime McLeod have been moved to 6:30pm Mondays.
  • The March 8 presentation Pests, Parks and Carbon Offsets was rescheduled to March 14.
  • A flute recital has been shifted to 3pm on March 11.
  • Film titles, screening locations and other details have been added for the Bates Film Festival, March 21–25.
  • The Mount David Summit has been added on March 23.
  • A public printmaking workshop on March 23 has been canceled.

Need directions? Here’s a campus map.

Want the latest events information? Visit the daily Events page.

Can’t attend the game? Watch the livestream:

  • Go to gobatesbobcats.com
  • Hover over the “Media” tab
  • Click the “Livestreams” link and look for your event. (Not all games are livestreamed.)

Questions or comments? Contact events editor Doug Hubley at calendar@bates.edu.


Recurring Events

Taking place while Bates is in session. Please confirm before you go.

5:40pm daily | Dharma Society meditation: A 20-minute group meditation. Monday-Saturday, meditation is silent. Participants on Sundays choose a group practice, often followed by dinner or discussion. FMI 207-786-8272.
Gomes Chapel

12:15pm Mon | Noontime meditation facilitated by the Multifaith Chaplaincy. Instruction at noon. FMI 207-786-8272.
Gomes Chapel

6:30pm Mon | Zen meditation led by Associated Buddhist Chaplain Heiku Jaime McLeod. Cushions provided, beginners welcome. FMI jaime@treetopzencenter.org.
Gomes Chapel

6pm Wed | Life drawing with the Museum of Art. Dry-media easels and drawing benches provided, bring drawing board and supplies. $10/$9 museum members; $90/$80 for pre-purchased 10-session tickets. FMI 207-786-8302.
Olin 259

10am Sun | Quaker meeting presented by the Lewiston Friends. FMI 207-786-8272.
163 Wood St.


9 Fri

7:30pm | Angels in America: Millennium Approaches. Theater professor Tim Dugan directs a play considered one of 20th-century America’s most important and thrilling works for the stage. Tony Kushner’s Tony- and Pulitzer Prize-winning epic explores sexuality, politics, religion, power and justice at the height of the AIDS epidemic. Free but tickets required: Eventbrite. $5 donations gratefully accepted. FMI 207-786-6161.
Schaeffer Theatre

7:40pm | Contradance: It’s time to dance! Enjoy calling by the renowned Dugan Murphy and live music by the Dead Sea Squirrels, who mix Celtic and Southern influences. All dances taught: Beginners are wildly encouraged to join the fun, no experience necessary. Beginner lesson at 7:40pm, dance from 8–11. Suggested donation $5–$8 (free for Bates students). FMI freewillfolk@gmail.com.
Muskie Archives


Spring tennis opens at home on March 10. Here we revisit Ben Rosen ’18 at work during the Bobcats’ stunning victory over No. 4 Bowdoin in April 2017. (Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College)

10 Sat

10am | Men’s tennis vs. Hamilton.
Merrill Gym

Noon | Women’s lacrosse vs. Wesleyan.
Garcelon Field

2pm | Women’s tennis vs. Hamilton.
Merrill Gym

5pm | Angels in America: Millennium Approaches (see March 9).
Schaeffer Theatre

7:30pm | Bates College Orchestra: Led by Hiroya Miura, the orchestra showcases winners of this year’s Bates Orchestra Concerto Competition. Nick White ’21 is the soloist for Carl Maria von Weber’s Concertino for Clarinet in E-flat major (Op. 26). Christine Cho ’19 and Elliot Chun ’18 share the spotlight in Bach’s Concerto for 2 Violins in D minor (BWV 1043). Also: Dvořák’s Symphony No. 9 in E minor (“From the New World”), Op. 95. Free but tickets required: batesconcerts.eventbrite.com. FMI 207-786-6135 or olinarts@bates.edu.
Olin Concert Hall

Hiroya Miura, associate professor of music at Bates. (Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College)


The Maine Jewish Film Festival screens two titles at Bates on March 11. 1945 is a suspenseful, beautiful film focusing on Hungarian village life in the titular year.

11 Sun

Noon | Maine Jewish Film Festival: 1945. Focusing on life in a Hungarian village in 1945, this suspenseful, visually beautiful black-and-white film explores how fear and guilt can generate unforeseen consequences. A discussion with Katalin Vecsey of Bates’ theater department, a Hungarian native, follows. A reception follows. Tickets: $10 general public / $8 students and seniors, available at www.mjff.org or at the door. The festival is also showing films in Portland and elsewhere March 10–18. FMI filmfest@mjff.org or www.mjff.org.
Olin 104

2pm | Angels in America: Millennium Approaches (see March 9).
Schaeffer Theatre

3pm | Flute recital: Music by three Bates students: Belle Hutchins ’18 of Westfield, N.J., offers works by Bach, Barber and Otar Taktakishvili. Hayou Sun ’19 of Beijing performs a madrigal by Philippe Gaubert, and Kate Zhao ’18 of Charlottesville, Va., plays a sonata by Michel Blavet. For the program’s centerpiece, the three join forces on the “Dance of the Reed Flutes” from Tchaikovsky’s Nutcracker Suite. Free, but tickets required: batesconcerts.eventbrite.com. FMI 207-786-6135 or olinarts@bates.edu.
Olin Concert Hall

3pm | Maine Jewish Film Festival: Mr. Gaga. Through breathtaking dance sequences and footage of intimate rehearsals, Mr. Gaga tells the story of Ohad Naharin, the renowned choreographer and artistic director of the Batsheva Dance Company. A reception in the Olin Arts Center precedes the film at 2pm, and a discussion with Julie Fox of Bates’ dance program follows. Tickets: $10 general public / $8 students and seniors, available at www.mjff.org or at the door. The festival is also showing films in Portland and elsewhere March 10–18. FMI filmfest@mjff.org or www.mjff.org.
Olin 104


12 Mon

6pm | La Jetée: A unique and perplexing short film that uses still images to portray a story of one man’s memories in the aftermath of World War III. An inspiration for Terry Gilliam’s 12 Monkeys, the film was directed by Chris Marker. A Bates International Science Fiction Festival screening. (France, 1962; 28 min.) FMI nfaries@bates.edu.
Olin 105

7:30pm | Angels in America: Millennium Approaches (see March 9).
Schaeffer Theatre


One Goal author Amy Bass ’92. (Rodney Bedsole)

13 Tue

4:15pm | Amy Bass ’92: A professor of history at the College of New Rochelle, Bass is the author of the new One Goal: A Coach, a Team, and the Game That Brought a Divided Town Together, the acclaimed story of how the Somali presence on the Lewiston High School soccer team produced both victories on the field and a more harmonious community. Co-sponsored by Purposeful Work and Alumni and Parent Engagement. FMI mcowan@bates.edu.
Pettengill G52


Joel Clement, formerly the top climate-change policy official at the U.S. Department of Interior, speaks about his experiences in the Trump administration on March 14.

14 Wed

Noon | Pests, Parks and Carbon Offsets: Community-Engaged Environmental Studies. In an event resecheduled from March 8, students present findings from capstone projects in environmental studies, including planning assistance for local Somali Bantu farmers; evaluating amenities in Lewiston’s Tree Streets neighborhood; and research into carbon offsets for air travel related to off-campus study. Public Works in Progress is sponsored by the Harward Center for Community Partnerships: Faculty, staff and off-campus guests may charge their Commons lunch to the Harward Center and bring it upstairs. FMI 207-786-6202.
Commons 221–222

7pm | The Trump Administration’s War on Climate Policy: A View From a Whistleblower Who Is Speaking Out. Joel Clement was director of the U.S. Office of Policy Analysis and the top climate-change policy official at the Department of Interior until he was reassigned to an unrelated post by the Trump administration. Sponsored by the Harward Center for Community Partnerships in conjunction with the Natural Resources Council of Maine, Maine Conservation Voters and Conservation Law Foundation. FMI 207-786-6202.
Olin Concert Hall

7:30pm | Alcaldessa: A promising new film director, Pau Faus captures the evolution of Catalonian politics and rights activism. Here he presents his portrayal of Ada Colau, a young civil rights and anti-evictions activist who, as the new mayor of Barcelona, became one of the youngest female mayors in Europe. Presented in partnership with the NEH Language Teaching Support Fund, the Spanish and politics departments, and the European studies program. (Spain, 2016; 88 min.) FMI mgilpois@bates.edu.
Olin 104


15 Thu

4:15pm | Pau Faus, Catalonian filmmaker: The director leads a roundtable discussion on social movements and screens his short documentary Two Years Later, sequel to Alcaldessa (see March 14). Presented in partnership with the NEH Language Teaching Support Fund and the Spanish, European studies and politics programs at Bates. FMI mgilpois@bates.edu.
Olin 104

4:15pm | Scholarly Digital Storytelling: Teaching and Learning in the Digital Age. A talk by Kelly Schrum, an associate professor in the Higher Education Program and director of educational projects at the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media, George Mason University. The Tangney Lecture is sponsored by the history department. FMI jhall2@bates.edu.
Pettengill G65


16 Fri

7pm | Inside the Chinese Closet: In a desperate attempt to meet their parents’ expectations, Andy goes on a hunt for a lesbian woman to marry and Cherry in search of a baby to adopt. Being homosexual makes it hard to conform to their families’ and society’s expectations, but both Andy and Cherry are determined to do things “the right way.” Directed by Sophia Luvara. Presented by the Filmboard. (Netherlands, 2015; 72 min.) FMI dunterbe@bates.edu.
Olin 104

7:30pm | Dry Land: Set in a present-day Florida high school, Ruby Rae Spiegel’s play is the story of two girls struggling amidst the pressures and expectations of society. For an independent study in theater, Rebecca Berger ’19 of Bethesda, Md., directs this exploration of the harsh realities of young adulthood, abortion and female friendship. FMI 207-786-6161.
Black Box Theater


Shown in April 2016, John Corrie directs the Bates College Choir. (Josh Kuckens/Bates College)

17 Sat

1pm | Men’s lacrosse vs. Trinity.
Garcelon Field

7:30pm | Dry Land (see March 16).
Black Box Theater

8pm | Bates College Choir: Directed by John Corrie, the choir sings two interpretations of the prayer “Gloria in excelsis Deo”: Antonio Vivaldi’s, with accompaniment by a string quartet, oboe, trumpet and organ; and John Rutter’s, accompanied by the Bates Brass Ensemble and organ. Free but tickets required: batesconcerts.eventbrite.com. FMI 207-786-6135 or olinarts@bates.edu.
Olin Concert Hall


18 Sun

7:30pm | Dry Land (see March 16).
Black Box Theater


20 Tue

5pm | Men’s lacrosse vs. Keene State.
Garcelon Field


The Spring Dance Concert begins its four-performance run on March 30. (Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College)

21 Wed

4pm | Luminous Cognizance: Toward a Buddhist Model of Consciousness. A talk by Matthew MacKenzie, associate professor of philosophy at Colorado State University. Sponsored by the philosophy and religious studies departments, as well as the Bates Learning Associates Program, which is funded by the Christian A. Johnson Endeavor Foundation. FMI 207-786-8204.
Pettengill G65

4:30pm | Bates Film Festival: Bates Shorts. Organized by rhetoric professor Jonathan Cavallero and his “Film Festival Studies” students, this inaugural college festival opens with short films involving Bates people. Included are America; I Too (directed by Anike Tourse ’92);  The First Coast (produced by Alexandra Morrow ’16); Strong at the Broken Places: Turning Trauma to Recovery (produced by Academy Award winner Stacey Kabat ’85); The River Behind My House (co-directed, photographed and edited by Alexandra Morrow); F––– by Nicole Danser ’15;  and Where Things May Grow (written and executive produced by Taylor Blackburn ’15). FMI jcavalle@bates.edu.
Olin 104

5pm | Women’s lacrosse vs. Roger Williams.
Garcelon Field

6pm | Stalker: The title character guides a professor and a writer through the government-restricted “Zone” in search of the “Room” — a place where wishes are said to come true. Helmed by the critically acclaimed Soviet director Andrei Tarkovsky, the film ranks No. 29 on the British Film Institute’s 50 Greatest Films of All Time. A Bates International Science Fiction Festival screening. (USSR, 1979; 102 min.) FMI nfaries@bates.edu.
Roger Williams 215

7:30pm | Bates Film FestivalWitchcraft BluePremiering at the festival, Witchcraft Blue tells the stories of Maine burlesque dancers, revealing how performing has brought them confidence about their bodies and personalities. Directed by Michael Sargent, associate professor of psychology at Bates. (2018, 96 minutes). FMI jcavalle@bates.edu.
Olin 104


22 Thu

5pm | Bates Film Festival: Shorts. Organized by rhetoric professor Jonathan Cavallero and his “Film Festival Studies” students, this inaugural college festival resumes with 90 minutes of shorts, many of them award-winners  (program TBA)FMI jcavalle@bates.edu.
Muskie Archives
 

7:30pm | 엄마 (“Dear Mom”) For her senior thesis in directing, Chaesong Kim of Goyang-si, South Korea, presents a piece described as “an open letter to Mom in the form of a multimedia solo performance.” FMI 207-786-6161.
Gannett Theater

8pm | Bates Film FestivalAnote’s ArkSet in the Pacific island nation of Kiribati, director by Matthieu Rytz’s documentary portrays the challenges that the changing climate and rising sea levels impose on residents and local leaders. With a goal of social justice, the festival board selected the film as a powerful depiction of the connections among the global climate, politics and the lives of ordinary people. (2018, 87 min.). The session opens with short films from Guyana, and concludes with a panel discussion of climate change. FMI jcavalle@bates.edu.
Muskie Archives


23 Fri

1:15pm | Mount David Summit: Bates’ annual campus-wide celebration of academic achievement spotlights the rich intellectual life of our students. The summit highlights undergraduate research; student creative work in art, dance, theater, music and film/video; sustainability projects; and community-engaged research. Musical prelude by the Bates Brass Ensemble at 1:15pm; welcoming remarks at 1:30. FMI bates.edu/summit.
Pettengill Hall

1:45pm | Bates Film FestivalYour BFF. Student organizers preview and discuss the inaugural Bates Film Festival. FMI jcavalle@bates.edu.
Location TBA

4:30pm | Bates Film Festival: White Rabbit. Director Daryl Wein’s narrative feature follows a Korean-American performance artist, living alone in Los Angeles, who assumes various identities to explore differences between Korean and Korean-American concerns. (2018, 71 minutes). FMI jcavalle@bates.edu.
Olin 104

7pm | Bates Film FestivalCrime and PunishmentWinner of the Special Jury Award for Social Impact at this year’s Sundance Film Festival, this groundbreaking documentary investigates the systematic injustice of policing in New York City. Director Steve Maing focuses on a group of black and Latino whistleblower cops who struggle through conflicts of duty and morality. (2018, 114 min.) FMI jcavalle@bates.edu.
Olin 104

7:30pm | 엄마 (“Dear Mom”) (see March 22).
Gannett Theater

10pm | Bates Film Festival: Frank Serpico. Director Antonino D’Ambrosio gives Frank Serpico (subject of the acclaimed 1973 fictionalized film) a venue to tell the story of his one-man crusade for reform in the New York Police Department during the early 1970s. (2017, 98 min.) FMI jcavalle@bates.edu.
Olin 104

Midnight | Bates Film Festival: I Still Know What You Did Last SummerWith a reboot of this horror franchise in the works, the festival marks the 20th anniversary of the sequel to the blockbuster I Know What You Did Last Summer. Co-written by Trey Callaway P’20. Returning leads include Jennifer Love Hewitt, Freddie Prinze Jr., Brandy Norwood and, as the hook-wielding killer, Ben Willis. “This follow-up to [1997’s] teens-in-jeopardy opus piles on the chills, thrills and body count.”— Variety. Also: the short Small Platelet DiningFMI jcavalle@bates.edu.
Olin 104


In April 2017, Bobcat Ventures judge Chris Barbin ’93 presents first-place winner Ali Rabideau ’17 with a check for $9,000 to support Herban Works. The entrepreneurial pitch competition returns on March 24. (Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College)

24 Sat

9am | Bates Film Festival: The Father and the BearWinner of five awards at the 2017 Reno Tahoe Film Festival — including best feature film, best director (John Putch) and best lead actor (Wil Love) — this drama depicts the emotional journey of a retired actor, diagnosed with dementia, who returns to his local playhouse in an attempt to perform one last time. (2016, 85 min.). A panel discussion on memory disorders follows. FMI jcavalle@bates.edu.
Olin 104

11am | Bobcat Ventures Pitch Competition: Now in its fourth year, the Bobcat Ventures pitch competition is student-run and alumni-judged, with prizes funded by Bates alumni and parents. The daylong event begins with President Clayton Spencer hosting a panel discussion with alumni judges, followed by student competitors presenting their entrepreneurial ideas. FMI bates.edu/bobcat-ventures or 207-786-6128.
Mays Center

11:30am | Bates Film Festival: Women in Media. A panel discussion featuring festival guestsFMI jcavalle@bates.edu.
Pettengill G52

1pm | Men’s lacrosse vs. Williams.
Garcelon Field

1:45pm | Bates Film FestivalThe Light of the MoonPraised as a “comprehensive and sympathetic look at the challenge of surviving” (New York Times), writer-director Jessica Thompson’s drama portrays a young professional as she struggles to regain control over her life following a rape. The film was the Audience Award Winner last year at South by Southwest. (2017, 90 min.) FMI jcavalle@bates.edu.
Olin 104

2pm | 엄마 (“Dear Mom”) (see March 22).
Gannett Theater

4:15pm | Bates Film FestivalSonita. The story of a teenage Afghan refugee, living in Iran, who uses rap music to speak out against forced child marriages that are an everyday reality in cultures around the world. Director Rokhsareh Ghaemmaghami’s documentary won six awards including the World Cinema Documentary Grand Jury Prize at Sundance 2016. (2015, 90 min.) FMI jcavalle@bates.edu.
Olin 104


25 Sun

12:30pm | Bates Film Festival: By the Time It Gets Dark. Director Anocha Suwichakornpong dramatizes the 1976 Thammasat University massacre, in which Thai state forces and far-right paramilitaries attacked students protesting the return to Thailand of a former military dictator. The film won the 2016 Suphannahong National Film Awards for Best Picture. (2016, 105 min.) FMI jcavalle@bates.edu.
Olin 104

2pm | 엄마 (“Dear Mom”) (see March 22).
Gannett Theater

12:30pm | Bates Film Festival: Inside the Writers’ Room. A master class with screenwriter Trey Callaway P’20 (I Still Know What You Did Last Summer) concludes the festival. FMI jcavalle@bates.edu.
Location TBA


26 Mon

Noon | Purposeful Work Unplugged: A conversation with Sam Evans-Brown ’09, host of New Hampshire Public Radio’s “Outside/In,” and Alex Kapelman ’09, critically acclaimed podcast host and founder of “Pitch” and “The Decision.” Purposeful Work Unplugged is a series of dynamic Q&A conversations with notable alumni, friends, faculty and staff about career trajectories and the traits that support meaningful work. FMI 207-786-6128.
Commons 221–222

7:30pm | 엄마 (“Dear Mom”) (see March 22).
Gannett Theater


27 Tue

5pm | Men’s lacrosse vs. Endicott.
Garcelon Field


Literary Arts Live presents fiction writer Ottessa Moshfegh in a reading on March 28. (Krystal Griffiths)

28 Wed

3pm | Softball vs. Southern Maine.
Lafayette Street Field

6:30pm | Literary Arts Live: Ottessa Moshfegh, fiction writer. A reading and conversation with Moshfegh, author of the award-winning McGlue and Eileen, as well as 2017’s Homesick for Another World. “Anyone who’s experienced the special kind of homesickness that lacks a home will find something to relate to in Moshfegh’s unsettling, sharp stories” — Michael Schaub, NPR. Hosted by author and Lecturer in English Jessica Anthony. A book sale and signing follow the reading. FMI janthony@bates.edu.
Muskie Archives

7:30pm | The Struggle for Human Rights From Syria to Maine: A talk by Mariam Jalabi about women amidst political unrest, and the need for peaceful and empowering solutions and strategies. Jalabi is the U.N. representative of the Syrian Opposition Coalition and an advocate for Syrian and women’s rights. Presented in partnership with the University of Maine School of Law’s Justice for Women Series. Sponsored by the Harward Center and the Office of the President at Bates. FMI 207-786-6202.
Commons 221

Mariam Jalabi. (Neil Beckerman)


A former high-level U.S. diplomat now teaching at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government, Nicholas Burns speaks at Bates on March 29. (Martha Stewart)

29 Thu

7:30pm | Trump Foreign Policy and Challenges to America’s Global Leadership: A talk by Nicholas Burns, a former high-level U.S. diplomat now teaching at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government. From 2005 to 2008, Burns was undersecretary of state for political affairs, the State Department’s third-ranking official, in which role he served as lead U.S. negotiator on Iran’s nuclear program. He previously served as ambassador to NATO and Greece, and as State Department spokesman. Burns is the Roy and Barbara Goodman Family Professor of the Practice of Diplomacy and International Relations at Harvard, where he founded and directs the Future of Diplomacy Project. Sponsored by the Office of the President and the politics department. FMI jscheide@bates.edu.
Commons 221–222


30 Fri

7pm | The Florida Project: A young girl’s summer break is filled with childhood wonder, possibility and a sense of adventure while the adults around her struggle with hard times. Presented by the Filmboard. (2017; 111 min.) FMI dunterbe@bates.edu.
Olin 104

7:30pm | Spring Dance Concert: In two different programs performed over four days, the focus is on student choreography. Tonight: Program A. Free, but tickets required, available at Eventbrite. $5 donations gratefully accepted. FMI 207-786-6161.
Schaeffer Theatre


The pan-Latin band Sol y Canto performs in an Olin Concert Series event on March 31. Joining the band’s principals, Rosi Amador and Brian Amador (shown), is their equally talented daughter, Alisa Amador ’18.

31 Sat

Noon | Baseball vs. Bowdoin (doubleheader).
Leahey Field

Noon | Women’s lacrosse vs. Hamilton.
Garcelon Field

5pm | Spring Dance Concert (see March 30). Tonight: Program B.
Schaeffer Theatre

7:30pm | Sol y Canto: The Olin Concert Series presents the Boston Music Award-winning pan-Latin ensemble led by Puerto Rican–Argentine singer and percussionist Rosi Amador and New Mexican guitarist-composer Brian Amador. They’ll be joined in this performance by their equally talented daughter, Alisa Amador ’18. Tickets $15, available at batesconcerts.eventbrite.com. FMI 207-786-6135 or olinarts@bates.edu.
Olin Concert Hall


“William Heyen, Poet II” (1980–81), a lithograph drawn from life on transfer paper by Sigmund Abeles, is on view in the exhibition “Literary.”

Museum of Art

bates.edu/museum

museum@bates.edu

Through March 23

Rona Pondick and Robert Feintuch: Heads, Hands, Feet; Sleeping, Holding, Dreaming, Dying. A couple since the mid-1970s, sculptor Pondick and painter Feintuch share interests in making work that uses the body to pursue psychologically suggestive meanings. This show, their first substantial joint exhibition, includes sculptures and prints by Pondick and paintings by Feintuch, who is a senior lecturer in art and visual culture at Bates.

Literary: An exhibition from the permanent collection including:

  • works that illustrate literary texts, such as prints by Claire Van Vliet for Franz Kafka’s “A Country Doctor” and Curlee Raven Holten’s “Othello Re-Imagined in Sepia”;
  • portraits of writers including James Agee by Walker Evans and Jack Kerouac by David Seltzer;
  • prints and photographs inspired by the writings of authors Bertolt Brecht (Rico Lebrun) and Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (Clare Romano);
  • and prints of literary publications by R. B. Kitaj including Four in America by Gertrude Stein.

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