Courses

Courses

SPAN 103. Accelerated Elementary Spanish.

Designed for students with prior experience in Spanish or another Romance language and for highly self-motivated students who wish to begin Spanish, the course reviews essential constructions and vocabulary. The course emphasizes oral proficiency and the development of reading and writing skills while fostering a cross-cultural understanding of the Spanish-speaking world with authentic texts and media. Not open to juniors or seniors. Not open to students who have received credit for SPAN 101 or 102. Enrollment limited to 22. Normally offered every year. Staff.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

SPAN 201. Intermediate Spanish I.

Designed to increase students' vocabulary and to improve mastery of language skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. The course provides a thorough review of grammar as well as an emphasis on conversational proficiency, expository writing, and Hispanic culture. Prerequisite(s): SPAN 103. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 22 per section. Normally offered every year. Staff.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

SPAN 202. Intermediate Spanish II.

Intensive practice in reading, composition, and conversation, as well as attention to selected grammar problems. The course focuses on discussion through visual presentations and selections of Hispanic literature, art, and culture. Prerequisite(s): SPAN 201. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 22 per section. Normally offered every year. Staff.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

SPAN 205. Advanced Spanish.

This course develops reading, writing, and interpretative skills as well as oral fluency and aural acuity by means of directed and spontaneous classroom activities and regular written assignments. Compositions, presentations, and conversations are based on assigned readings and films. Placement though a departmental examination is recommended. Not open to students returning from off-campus study in a Spanish-speaking country. Not open to students who have received credit for SPAN 207. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 20. Normally offered every semester. Staff.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

SPAN 211. Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis.

In this course students get acquainted with the basic tools, concepts, and terminology of textual analysis. They become familiar with recent critical approaches to the study of modern Spanish and Spanish American literary and cultural work. Prerequisite(s): Spanish 205. Open to first-year students. [W2] Normally offered every year. F. López.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

SPAN 222. Short Narrative in the Spanish-speaking World.

This course considers the development, functions, and varieties of short narrative in the Spanish-speaking world. Students examine the thematic content of stories in light of sociohistorical contexts, and explore the evolution of the elements and language of story-telling in terms of categories of literary periodization. Prerequisite(s): SPAN 205. Recommended background: SPAN 211. Enrollment limited to 30. Normally offered every other year. D. George.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

SPAN 224. Protest and Justice.

At different times and in different countries, many Hispanic writers, filmmakers, and other artists have felt compelled to create works that confront various types of social injustice. These range from the effects of imperialism to political repression, and often address issues of race, sexuality, gender, and class. In this course students analyze such "texts" within their respective social, political, and historical contexts. Enrollment limited to 25. F. López.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

SPAN 228. Screen and Media.

This course examines the complex relationship between literature and screen media in terms of: 1) the representative possibilities and limits each offer for the exploration and projection of relevant social, political, and cultural issues; and 2) the processes, through study of different theoretical and aesthetic approaches, creators use to adapt works from one mode to the other. Through the analysis of literary and audiovisual productions from Latin America, Spain, and the United States, students engage the theoretical, technical, and practical debates among institutions, producers, and consumers that emerge in the process of transposing discourse across media forms. Prerequisite(s): SPAN 211. Not open to students who have received credit for SPAN 217. C. Aburto Guzmán, D. George.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

SPAN 230. Readings in Spanish American and Caribbean Literature.

Students engage representative readings from Spanish-American and Caribbean literatures dating from the colonial period to the late nineteenth century. Literature regarding African, indigenous, and European conflict and exchange and negotiation in the Caribbean are studied as the first locus of colonial encounters. Early developments in Spanish American literature take center stage as hispanoamericans construct their intellectual autonomy through artistic expression. The course emphasizes Spanish American nationalisms and contestatory literatures that provide divergent gendered, sexual, and racial viewpoints. The course is a multi-genre review that includes essay, chronicle, poetry, and theater. Prerequisite(s): SPAN 211. Not open to students who have received credit for SPAN 215. Open to first-year students. Normally offered every year. C. Aburto Guzmán, M. Pettway.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

SPAN 231. Readings in Spanish Literature.

What are the points of convergence and divergence between Spain and Europe? How has Spain articulated itself as European? How and by what motives has Spain emphasized its difference vis-à-vis Europe? In this course, students consider these questions through the reading of representative literary works by Spanish writers from all periods in light of the European context in which they were crafted. Students pay special attention to how broad, sweeping historical processes that stand as markers of European identity such as wars, revolutions, and cultural and philosophical movements are reflected in Spanish literature. Central themes include religion and expansion, modern monarchies and the making of the "people," the invention of the nation and the ideal citizen, and postcolonial disorders. Not open to students who have received credit for SPAN 216. Open to first-year students. [W2] Normally offered every year. F. López.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

INDS 290. The Afro-Hispanic Diaspora.

The 500-year presence of Africans and their descendants in the Spanish-speaking world has produced a significant body of literature by blacks and about blacks. Spanish America was the main destination of the African diaspora. Afro-Hispanic writers attest to the struggle for freedom and the abolition of slavery. Their literature shows how the participation of blacks in the wars of Latin American independence was a struggle for their emancipation. Afro-Hispanic writers in Spain, the Americas, and Africa use their art and ideas to address the postnational migrations of the twenty-first century, a diaspora that has not ceased. Recommended background: AAS 100. Cross-listed in African American studies, Latin American studies, and Spanish. Open to first-year students. B. Fra-Molinero.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

SPAN 301. Introduction to Translation.

An introduction to the basic principles of translation: theories, methods, and techniques. With an emphasis on practical issues related to both language and culture, students focus on linguistic structure, text analysis, idiomatic expressions, and cultural specificities. Students improve their knowledge of the Spanish language and develop their translation skills through extensive practice both in the classroom and beyond. Prerequisite(s): SPAN 211 or one 200-level Spanish literature course. Enrollment limited to 15. F. López.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

INDS 302. Building a Room of Her Own: Writing the Caribbean Woman in Contemporary Contexts.

This course explores feminine and feminist writing in the Hispanophone Caribbean with an emphasis on the body as a site of pleasure, race as social construct, and embodied experience and narrative as liberatory practice. Students engage the novel, testimonial literature, and short story to read the articulation of queer, meztiza, and black female subjectivities. This course acknowledges women authors from the circum-Caribbean region, both insular and continental, as wide-ranging as Puerto Rico, Colombia, Haiti/Dominican Republic, and Panama. Prerequisite(s): SPAN 211 and 230. Cross-listed in African American studies, Latin American studies, Spanish, and women and gender studies. Enrollment limited to 15. M. Pettway.
Interdisciplinary Programs

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

SP/WS 323. Gendered Experiences in the Américas Borderlands.

This course examines tensions relating to geographical locations and historical relationships of power. It reviews gendered experiences of transnational border crossers throughout the Américas. Students become acquainted with testimonies, film, photography, and fictional narrative as well as government reports on human trafficking and slave labor. Readings are in Spanish and English. All discussions and written assignments are in Spanish. Prerequisite(s): one 200-level Spanish literature course. Not open to students who have received credit for SPAN 223. C. Aburto Guzmán.
Concentrations

EU/SP 324. Memories of Civil War in European Film and Literature.

Issues of memory and postmemory are one of the most relevant concerns in contemporary European culture. This course explores how these concerns are represented in film and narratives of several European civil wars in the twentieth century. Although the main focus is on representations of the Spanish conflict, students also consider the cases of the former Yugoslavia, Ireland, and Greece. Theories of memory (cultural and collective) and postmemory provide the framework for textual and cultural analysis. Recommended background: at least one course on Spanish (Spain), French, German, Russian, or English literature. Enrollment limited to 15. F. López.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

SPAN 330. Writing the Caribbean Nation: Race, Religion, and Revolution.

This course examines the twentieth-century novel and short story of Spanish Caribbean nations Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic, and Cuba. Students explore the sociocultural place of Catholicism, African descendant spirituality, and race in considering the ways Caribbean nations consecrate certain forms of religious practice while denigrating others. Race is studied in terms of the allocation of visible as well as less perceptible socioeconomic benefits. Critical writing, literary analysis, and the contextualization of the text are skills developed in this course.Prerequisite: SPAN 211, 222, or 230. M. Pettway.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

SPAN 335. Translation, Gender, and Place.

This course examines gender and place in the translation of comics or graphic novels and poetry from two convergent angles, that of the writer and the translator. It considers the parameters of translation processes, specifically the relationships of power existing between genders and place, and how these are influenced by consumer demands. The course contains a practicum component in which students translate into English from Spanish and into Spanish from English. Discussion and written work is in Spanish. Prerequisite(s): two 200-level Spanish courses beyond SPAN 205. Recommended background: Spanish 301. Enrollment limited to 20. C. Aburto Guzmán.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

SPAN 341. Cervantes.

A careful reading and a comprehensive formal and thematic study of Don Quijote de la Mancha. This course examines in particular the representation of the Muslim Other in this work. The effects of Don Quijote on the development of the novel as a genre are seen in relation to giving voice to women and cultural, social, and political minorities. Prerequisite(s): one 200-level Spanish literature course. B. Fra-Molinero.
Concentrations

SPAN 342. Hybrid Cultures: Latin American Intersections.

Latin America is a space of intersections where cultures meet and/or crash. Concepts and experiences used to define, locate, and represent these cultures to each other are continuously modified at the crossings. This course considers theoretical, literary, and visual cultural products as a cross-section of this phenomenon. Prerequisite(s): Spanish 230 and one upper level 200 Spanish course. Enrollment limited to 20. C. Aburto Guzmán.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

SPAN 343. Postcolonial Thought in Latin America.

This course examines Latin American intellectual inquiry on postcoloniality in dialogue with transnational postcolonial thought. The course considers critical readings of recent work by Spanish American scholars, authors, poets, and filmmakers. Theoretical work may be in English; the class is conducted in Spanish and all student work is in Spanish. Prerequisite(s): Spanish 215 and one upper level 200 Spanish course Enrollment limited to 20. C. Aburto Guzmán.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

SP/WS 344. Gendering Social Awareness in Contemporary Spain.

In this course, students use gender as the main category of analysis, paying particular attention to its interconnectedness with power. Carefully examining texts written by women in contemporary Spain, students explore the deliberate use of gender as a lens through which to understand different forms of domination—economic, political, and social. Prerequisite(s): one 200-level Spanish literature course. Instructor permission is required. F. López.
Concentrations

SPAN 345. Twentieth-Century Spanish Drama.

In this course, students address the study of drama from a cultural studies perspective, paying attention to the representation of social, political, and cultural matters in twentieth- and twenty-first-century Spain. The course focuses on how playwrights use different dramatic trends to address such themes as censorship, exile, gender, memory, and migration. The authors discussed are representative and inclusive, ranging from Lorca and Buero Vallejo to Paloma Pedrero and Itziar Pascual. Prerequisite(s): one 200-level Spanish literature course. Not open to students who have received credit for SPAN 445. F. López.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

SPAN 347. Building Memory: Narratives of the Spanish Civil War.

The Spanish Civil War is both an important historical landmark and the main theme of myriad literary and film narratives produced since the establishment of democracy in Spain. In this seminar, students consider the increasing popularity of fictional representations of this armed conflict, its political antecedent (Segunda República), and its consequence (el régimen de Francisco Franco). What is the role of these narratives? What do they say about the roots of Spanish democratic traditions? How do they negotiate conflict? What type of Spain do they propose? Prerequisite(s): one 200-level Spanish literature course. Enrollment limited to 15. F. López.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

AA/SP 350. Representing Blacks in Cuban Literature: From the Colony to the Revolution.

This course examines innovations and shifts in the representation of African descendants in Cuban literature. Students read narrative pieces, essays, letters, and poetry written by and about blacks that span the early colonial period to Revolutionary Cuba. Adapting an in-depth multidisciplinary approach, black as object is critically analyzed in opposition to literary and historical texts that construct black as subject. Race, religion, slavery, and gender as well as the formation of Afro-Cuban subjectivities are the primary topics of study, revealing the black struggle against multiple structures of domination as well as the resilience to negotiate with power. Prerequisite(s): SPAN 222, 230, or 231. M. Pettway.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

EU/SP 351. Iberian Modernisms: Modernity, Literature and Crisis in Portugal and Spain.

This course explores literary and artistic responses to the social, political, and cultural crises of modernity in Portugal and Spain from 1890 to 1934. It traces the emergence of the concept of the "modern" in early twentieth-century Europe, and examines the particular forms and content of Iberian modernism in terms of language, the unconscious, sexuality and gender, religion, liberalism, Europe as Other, empire, and cosmopolitanism. Students discuss works translated into English by Portuguese and Spanish authors such as Antonio Machado, Fernando Pessoa, Pio Baroja, Concha Espina, and Mário Sá-Caneiro as well as contemporary film, art, and critical readings in history and cultural theory. Enrollment limited to 15. D. George.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

SPAN 360. Independent Study.

Students, in consultation with a faculty advisor, individually design and plan a course of study or research not offered in the curriculum. Course work includes a reflective component, evaluation, and completion of an agreed-upon product. Sponsorship by a faculty member in the program/department, a course prospectus, and permission of the chair are required. Students may register for no more than one independent study per semester. Normally offered every semester. Staff.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

SPAN 366. Fantastic Hispanic Cinema.

This course explores the genres of horror and fantasy in recent Spanish-language films by directors from Mexico, Chile, Argentina, Spain, and the United States. It considers how these works represent the supernatural, the diabolical, evil violence, fear, paranoia, and magic; create, perpetuate, and subvert categories of gender, class, race, and sexuality; and adapt and participate in key literary and cinematic genres such as the Gothic, parody, adventure, family drama, magical realism, and science fiction. Prerequisite(s): one 200-level Spanish literature course. Enrollment limited to 20. D. George.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

SPAN 368. Realismo.

This course studies the emergence and evolution of the Realist novel in late-nineteenth-century Spain as an aesthetic response to the vast social, political and cultural changes wrought by the uneven processes of modernity. Special attention is given to how Spanish writers debated, embraced, and rejected the techniques of Realism and Naturalism cultivated elsewhere in Europe, and also how they sought to revive the Spanish Realist tradition by looking to works by Cervantes, Velázquez, and Goya. Readings include novels and essays by authors such as Emilia Pardo Bazán, Juan Valera, Vicente Blasco Ibáñez, Benito Pérez Galdós and Caterina Albert, which are engaged in light of issues such as gender, class, nationalism, and religion. Recommended background: SPAN 230 or 231. Enrollment limited to 20. D. George.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

SPAN 457. Senior Thesis.

A capstone project, which may take the form of a written research paper, literary or cultural analysis, translation project, creative project, or digital portfolio, designed in consultation with the faculty advisor. Students register for SPAN 457 in the fall semester. Majors writing an honors thesis register for both SPAN 457 and 458. A detailed outline and bibliography must be approved by the department. [W3] Normally offered every year. Staff.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

SPAN 458. Senior Thesis.

A continuation of SPAN 457. Majors writing an honors thesis register for both SPAN 457 and 458. [W3] Normally offered every year. Staff.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

Short Term Courses

LS/SP s21. Human Rights and Social Art in Latin America: The Case of Nogales, Mexico.

This course focuses on the social dynamics that generate social art committed to change in Latin America. Students examine three settings in which artists utilize the arts to generate aesthetic and production models that represent the "uniqueness of place." During ten days off campus, students work with artists who engage technology to raise consciousness about the "needs of place." In Nogales, Mexico, students consider human rights discourses that address migrants' dislocation. They also work with volunteers, hike the desert, and visit shelters to contextualize the social and natural environments. Prerequisite(s): SPAN 207. Enrollment limited to 15. Instructor permission is required. C. Aburto Guzmán.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

SPAN s29. Cinema in Spain.

This course traces the evolution of Spanish cinema from the introduction of the cinematógrafo in 1896 to the Oscar-winning films of Trueba and Almódovar of the 1990s. The study of cinema as popular entertainment, political propaganda, and as a medium for intellectual experimentation and social and political contestation draws attention to the role those working in the film industry, or at its margins, have played in shaping Spanish culture and society in the twentieth century. Particular attention is given to film genre and narrative technique, and to such theoretical concepts as national cinema, studio systems, the auteur, and gender and sexuality. Recommended background: SPAN 202. D. George.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

SPAN s30. Escritura creativa: Cuento.

This course combines reading and intensive writing. Students read carefully selected short stories in order to gain an understanding of the genre and to apply what they learn to their own craft. The focus is on the fundamentals of short fiction writing: structure, plot, voice, point of view, description, and dialogue. Class meetings follow a workshop format, with writing exercises, class discussions, and in-depth critique of students' writing. Prerequisite(s): one 200-level Spanish literature course. Enrollment limited to 15. F. López.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

SPAN s34. The Practice of Translation in Three Specialty Areas.

The course gives the students the opportunity to practice translating documents pertinent to three specialty areas: medicine, environmental studies, and literature. Students translate documents daily and the translations are revised in class. Students develop new vocabulary, insight into the profession of translating, and familiarity with document formatting. Prerequisite(s): SPAN 211 or an advanced Spanish course. C. Aburto Guzmán.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

SPAN s50. Independent Study.

Students, in consultation with a faculty advisor, individually design and plan a course of study or research not offered in the curriculum. Course work includes a reflective component, evaluation, and completion of an agreed-upon product. Sponsorship by a faculty member in the program/department, a course prospectus, and permission of the chair are required. Students may register for no more than one independent study during a Short Term. Normally offered every year. Staff.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations