Courses

Courses

SPAN 103. Accelerated Elementary Spanish.

Designed for students with minimal experience in Spanish or another Romance language and for highly self-motivated students who wish to begin Spanish, the course reviews essential constructions and vocabulary. The course emphasizes oral proficiency and the development of reading and writing skills while fostering a cross-cultural understanding of the Spanish-speaking world with authentic texts and media. Not open to juniors or seniors. Enrollment limited to 22. Normally offered every year. Staff.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

SPAN 201. Intermediate Spanish I.

Designed to increase students' vocabulary and improve foundational skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing. The course provides a thorough review of grammar as well as an emphasis on conversational proficiency, expository writing, and the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world. Prerequisite(s): SPAN 103 or through placement exam. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 22. Normally offered every year. Staff.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

SPAN 202. Intermediate Spanish II.

Intensive practice in reading, composition, and conversation, as well as attention to selected grammar problems. The course focuses on discussion through visual presentations and selections of literature, art, and culture of the Spanish-speaking world. Prerequisite(s): SPAN 201 or through placement exam. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 22. Normally offered every year. Staff.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

SPAN 205. Advanced Spanish.

This course develops advanced skill in reading and writing as well as oral fluency and aural acuity through classroom activities and written assignments based on literary and nonliterary texts and audiovisual media. It introduces analytical and interpretative strategies necessary to engage and decode the breadth and variety of cultural productions originating in the Spanish-speaking world. Not open to students returning from off-campus study in a Spanish-speaking country. Not open to seniors. Prerequisiste(s): Spanish 202 or throught placement exam. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 19. Normally offered every semester. Staff.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

SPAN 210. Writing Spanish.

This course teaches skills useful for writing in upper-level courses, the senior thesis, or the senior portfolio in Spanish. Students develop the ability to be flexible and versatile writers in Spanish in a variety of forms of academic writing (narrative, descriptive, expositive, argumentative) and learn the importance of the writing process (drafting, revision, rewriting, editing). The course expands students' understanding of research and writing as tools for creating and communicating knowledge of the Spanish-speaking world by encouraging them to use Spanish to ask, research, and answer questions of significance and importance. Prerequisite(s): SPAN 205. Not open to seniors. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 25. [W2] Normally offered every year. Staff.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

SPAN 211. Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis.

In this course students learn the basic tools, concepts, and terminology of textual analysis. They become familiar with recent critical approaches to the study of modern Spanish and Spanish American literary and cultural work. Prerequisite(s): SPAN 205. Not open to seniors. [W2] Normally offered every year. Staff.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

SPAN 222. Short Narrative in the Spanish-speaking World.

This course considers the development, functions, and varieties of short narrative in the Spanish-speaking world. Students examine the thematic content of stories in light of sociohistorical contexts, and explore the evolution of the elements and language of story-telling in terms of categories of literary periodization. Prerequisite(s): SPAN 210 or 211. Not open to seniors. Enrollment limited to 29. Staff.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

SPAN 224. Protest and Justice.

At different times and in different countries, many writers, filmmakers, and other artists from the Spanish-speaking world have felt compelled to create works that confront various types of social injustice. These range from the effects of imperialism to political repression, and often address issues of race, sexuality, gender, and class. In this course students analyze these "texts" within their respective social, political, and historical contexts. Prerequisites(s): SPAN 210 or 211. Not open to seniors. Enrollment limited to 25. Staff.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

SPAN 226. Gender, Race and Sexuality.

This course examines Spanish and Latin American literatures and other cultural productions at the intersections of race, gender, and sexuality. It studies not only the delight and the dangers inherent in representations of sexuality, but also how definitions of race and gender form dominant ideas about sexual practices in the Spanish-speaking world. Students become familiar with patterns, shifts, and ruptures in discourses about these issues across different sociopolitical contexts, and apply specific theories and conceptual tools for reading and understanding the myriad complexities of Latin American and Spanish identities. Prerequisite(s): SPAN 210 or 211. Not open to seniors. Enrollment limited to 29. Staff.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

SPAN 228. Screen and Media.

This course examines the complex relationship between literature and screen media in terms of 1) the representative possibilities and limits each offer for the exploration and projection of relevant social, political, and cultural issues and 2) the processes, through study of different theoretical and aesthetic approaches, creators use to adapt works from one mode to the other. Through the analysis of literary and audiovisual productions from Latin America, Spain, and the United States, students engage the theoretical, technical, and practical debates among institutions, producers, and consumers that emerge in the process of transposing discourse across media forms. Prerequisite(s): SPAN 210 or 211. Not open to seniors. Staff.
Concentrations

SPAN 230. Readings in Spanish American and Spanish Caribbean Literature.

Students engage representative readings from Spanish American and Caribbean literatures dating from the myths of origin in the pre-conquest period to the mid-twentieth century. The course examines the chronicles of conquest that set the tone for ongoing debates on the processes of coloniality. Through period texts, students consider debates on intellectual autonomy; regional and national identities; and the rights of indigenous people, African descendants, and women in the new nations of the nineteenth-century. The course ends with an emphasis on literatures that provide divergent gendered, sexual, racial, and political viewpoints. The course is a multi-genre review that includes essay, chronicle, poetry, and testimony. Prerequisite(s): SPAN 210 or 211. Not open to seniors. Normally offered every year. Staff.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

SPAN 231. Readings in Spanish Literature.

What are the points of convergence and divergence between Spain and Europe? How has Spain articulated itself as European? How and by what motives has Spain emphasized its differences vis-à-vis Europe? In this course, students consider these questions by reading representative literary works by Spanish writers from all periods in light of the European context in which they were crafted. Students pay special attention to how broad, sweeping historical processes that stand as markers of European identity, such as wars, revolutions, and cultural and philosophical movements, are reflected in Spanish literature. Central themes include religion and expansion, modern monarchies and the making of the "people," the invention of the nation and the ideal citizen, and postcolonial disorders. Prerequisite(s): SPAN 210 or 211. Not open to seniors. [W2] Normally offered every year. Staff.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

SPAN 233. Drama and Performance in the Spanish-speaking World.

This course studies twentieth- and twenty-first-century works by playwrights and performers from the Spanish-speaking world and the contexts in which they are written, produced, and staged. From avant-garde drama to political action, queer performance, live art, dance, cultural tourism, and the spectacles of the commercial theater, students explore a range of drama and performance theories and practices, and the specific ways Hispanic writers and artists use traditional and alternative spaces as venue for engaging issues of social and aesthetic concern. Prerequisite(s): SPAN 205. Prerequisite(s) which may be taken concurrently: SPAN 210 or 211. New course beginning Winter 2019. Enrollment limited to 29. Normally offered every other year. F. López.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

SPAN 301. Introduction to Translation.

An introduction to the basic principles of translation: theories, methods, and techniques. With an emphasis on practical issues related to both language and culture, students focus on linguistic structure, text analysis, idiomatic expressions, and cultural specificities. Students improve their knowledge of the Spanish language and develop their translation skills through extensive practice both in the classroom and beyond. Only open to junior and seniors. Enrollment limited to 15. F. López.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

LS/SP 317. Screening Citizenship: Jewish Latin American Film.

This course considers films from throughout Latin America made by Jewish directors. Students learn the history of Latin American film production as well as terms and skills necessary for audiovisual analysis. The course examines the ways in which film is used as a vehicle to explore and represent issues of identity, belonging, immigration, and assimilation that have long characterized Jewish experiences in Latin America. Moreover, the course focuses on filmmakers’ engagement with key social and political issues within their respective countries as well as on a regional or global scale. Prerequisite(s): SPAN 211 and one additional 200-level Spanish course. Recommended background: SPAN 228. Enrollment limited to 15. S. Pridgeon.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

INDC 321. Afroambiente: Writing a Black Environment.

This course studies the response of black writers and intellectuals of the Spanish-speaking world to issues related to the natural environment. In three countries, Ecuador, Puerto Rico, and Equatorial Guinea, modernity has brought serious challenges to notions of economic progress, human rights, and national sovereignty, as well as individual and communal identity. Course materials include written texts from local newspapers and magazines as well as other sources of information such as Internet sites that discuss issues related to the environment and the arts. All readings are in English. Cross-listed in African American studies, environmental studies, Latin American studies, and Spanish. Only open to juniors and seniors. Enrollment limited to 15. B. Fra-Molinero.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

GS/SP 323. Gendered Experiences in the Américas Borderlands.

Students become acquainted with film, comics, music, fiction and nonfiction narratives that engage border tensions and issues of immigration in English and Spanish. Concepts such as sense of place, mobility, and permanence; histories of place; place of enunciation; transnational historical memory of migration; and transnational historical networks are utilized as critical lenses to analyze gendered experiences of migration. All discussions, presentatioms, and written assignments are in Spanish. Recommended background: SPAN 230. Prerequisite(s): one 200-level Spanish course above SPAN 211. Only open to juniors and seniors. Not open to students who have received credit for SP/WS 323. Enrollment limited to 15. C. Aburto Guzmán.
Concentrations

EU/SP 324. Memories of Civil War in European Film and Literature.

Issues of memory and postmemory form one of the most relevant concerns in contemporary European culture. This course explores how these concerns are represented in film and narratives of several European civil wars in the twentieth century. Although the main focus is on representations of the Spanish conflict, students also consider the cases of the former Yugoslavia, Ireland, and Greece. Theories of memory (cultural and collective) and postmemory provide the framework for textual and cultural analysis. Recommended background: at least one course on Spanish (Spain), French, German, Russian, or English literature. Only open to juniors and seniors. Enrollment limited to 15. F. López.
Concentrations

SPAN 335. Translating Place and War.

This course considers the parameters involved in translation processes, specifically in the translation of cultural texts that refer to war, experiences of war, and acts of war. Particular attention is paid to gendered and geographically nuanced texts that stand on opposite sides of the question of whether war is justified. Students contextualize cultural texts according to the time and place of both writer and translator before choosing a "theoretical stance" from which to critique an existing translation, and developing a theoretical approach for the practicum component. The practicum consists of translating chosen texts (graphic novel, poetry and recorded memory) from Spanish into English and from English into Spanish. Discussions and supplemental assignments are in Spanish. Prerequisite(s): two 200-level Spanish courses beyond SPAN 210. Only open to juniors and seniors. Enrollment limited to 15. C. Aburto Guzmán.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

SPAN 337. Las voces del pueblo: Poetry and Music as Social Resistance in Latin America.

This course considers poetry and music as a form of social and political contestation in twentieth-century Latin America. Students become familiar with movements of poetry as well as songwriting and their relationship to discourses of political resistance and social movements. They explore the way in which verse is crafted in order to articulate resistance against forms of hegemonic power including empire (formal and informal), social and economic inequality, and racial and sexual oppression. The course takes into account the present-day legacy of these poets and songwriters through street art, recent film, and younger generations of Latin American poets and songwriters. Prerequisite(s): one Spanish course beyond SPAN 211. Recommended background: SPAN 230. Only open to juniors and seniors. Enrollment limited to 15. S. Pridgeon.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

AS/SP 338. Asia in the Hispanic and Lusophone Worlds.

Between 1571 and 1815, the galleon route between Acapulco and Manila linked Asia to the Portuguese and Spanish-speaking worlds and gave rise to a global exchange of culture, people, and commerce that still continues today. Through literature, film, and visual art, this course examines the variety of contacts and encounters that have shaped this particular East-West relationship, generated by processes of exploration, colonization, migration, and travel. Course materials include primary and second works from Asia (Japan, Korea, China, Malaysia, and the Philippines), Europe (Spain and Portugal), and Latin America (Mexico, Cuba, Peru, Argentina, and Brazil). Recommended background: AS/HI 110, 171; AS/JA 125; SPAN 230, 231. Enrollment limited to 15. D. George.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

LS/SP 341. Lectura americana de Cervantes.

A present-day reading in America of Don Quijote de La Mancha and other key texts of the Spanish and Spanish American Renaissance. This course examines themes of Islamophobia, white supremacy, conquest and empire, the slave trade, the quest for utopias, and the construction of historical narratives that shape the politics of the day. Students analyze myths and legends of the marvelous real such as the fountain of youth in Florida, the island of California, the return to the Golden Age, fabulous cities and unbelievable real ones (Mexico-Tenochtitlan, Cuzco) that are admired and destroyed, and a fake island in Louisiana called Barataria. Students consider issues that obsessed people in Cervantes' time: the expulsion of Muslims, hatred of Jews, war, gender roles and women's freedom, mental and physical disability, and changes to the environment in the form of windmills. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite(s): one 200-level Spanish course above SPAN 211. Recommended background: SPAN 231. Only open to juniors and seniors. Enrollment limited to 15. B. Fra-Molinero.
Concentrations

SPAN 342. Texturing Latin America.

The vast region of Latin America has lent itself to continuous debates that range from reinterpretation of historical processes to contemporary resistance movements against shifting centers of power. This course considers diverse theoretical stances, historical viewpoints, and a decentering ideological approach to critically contextualize the visual representations of space, place, and the material presence of human beings. Students examine the photographic representations of the mineworker’s body from the late nineteenth century to the present, the arpilleras' textured documentation of experiences of oppression and solidarity, and documentaries on organic constructions of living spaces on marginal metropolitan locales in order to gauge the impact of said debates on people and their quotidian life. Questions and experiences of gender, race, class, and political ideology are woven into the discussion. Readings are both in Spanish and English. All discussions and written assignments are in Spanish. Prerequisite(s): SPAN 230 and one upper-level 200 Spanish course. Enrollment limited to 15. C. Aburto Guzmán.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

GS/SP 344. Gendering Social Awareness in Contemporary Spain.

In this course, students use gender as the main category of analysis, paying particular attention to its interconnectedness with power. Carefully examining texts written by women in contemporary Spain, students explore the deliberate use of gender as a lens through which to understand different forms of domination—economic, political, and social. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite(s): one 200-level Spanish course above SPAN 211. Recommended background: SPAN 231. Only open to juniors and seniors. Not open to students who have received credit for SP/WS 344. Enrollment limited to 15. Instructor permission is required. F. López.
Concentrations

EU/SP 351. Iberian Modernisms: Modernity, Literature, and Crisis in Portugal and Spain.

This course explores literary and artistic responses to the social, political, and cultural crises of modernity in Portugal and Spain from 1890 to 1934. It traces the emergence of the concept of the "modern" in early twentieth-century Europe, and examines the particular forms and content of Iberian modernism in terms of language, the unconscious, sexuality and gender, religion, liberalism, Europe as Other, empire, and cosmopolitanism. Students discuss works translated into English by Portuguese and Spanish authors such as Antonio Machado, Fernando Pessoa, Pio Baroja, Concha Espina, and Mário Sá-Caneiro as well as contemporary film, art, and critical readings in history and cultural theory. Recommended background: at least one course on Spanish (Spain), French, German, Russian, or English literature. Only open to juniors and seniors. Enrollment limited to 15. D. George.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

SPAN 360. Independent Study.

Students, in consultation with a faculty advisor, individually design and plan a course of study or research not offered in the curriculum. Course work includes background research, a reflective component, evaluation, and completion of an agreed-upon product. Sponsorship by a faculty member in the department, a course prospectus, and permission of the chair are required. Students may register for no more than one independent study per semester. Staff.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

EU/SP 366. Iberian Nightmares: Fantasy and Horror in Spanish and Portuguese Cinemas.

This course explores the genres of fantasy and horror in Spanish and Portuguese cinemas from the silent era to the present. It considers how such films represent the supernatural, the diabolical, evil violence, fear, paranoia, and magic; create, perpetuate, and subvert categories of gender, class, race, and sexuality; and adapt and participate in key European literary and cinematic genres such as the Gothic, parody, adventure, family drama, magical realism, and science fiction. Special attention is given to how these particular forms of popular cinema reinterpret Iberian traditions and how they reflect the anxieties of contemporary Spanish and Portuguese societies vis-à-vis processes of modernization, democratization, integration in Europe, and globalization. Taught in English. Recommended background: RHET 120, 240, or SPAN 228 or other introductory film studies course. Only open to juniors and seniors. Enrollment limited to 15. D. George.
Concentrations

SPAN 368. Realismo.

This course studies the emergence and evolution of the Realist novel in late-nineteenth-century Spain as an aesthetic response to the vast social, political and cultural changes wrought by the uneven processes of modernity. Special attention is given to how Spanish writers debated, embraced, and rejected the techniques of Realism and Naturalism cultivated elsewhere in Europe, and also how they sought to revive the Spanish Realist tradition by looking to works by Cervantes, Velázquez, and Goya. Readings include novels and essays by authors such as Emilia Pardo Bazán, Juan Valera, Vicente Blasco Ibáñez, Benito Pérez Galdós, and Caterina Albert, which are engaged in light of issues such as gender, class, nationalism, and religion. Recommended background: SPAN 231. Prerequisite(s): one 200-level Spanish course above SPAN 211. Only open to juniors and seniors. Enrollment limited to 15. D. George.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

INDC 390. The Afro-Latin Americans.

The 500-year presence of Africans and their descendants in the Spanish-speaking world has produced a significant body of literature by blacks and about blacks. Spanish America was the main destination of the African diaspora. Afro-Hispanic writers attest to the struggle for freedom and the abolition of slavery. Their literature shows how the participation of blacks in the wars of Latin American independence was a struggle for their emancipation. Afro-Hispanic writers in Spain, the Americas, and Africa use their art and ideas to address the postnational migrations of the twenty-first century, a diaspora that has not ceased. Recommended background: AAS 100. Cross-listed in African American studies, Latin American studies, and Spanish. Taught in English. Only open to juniors and seniors. Not open to students who have received credit for INDS 290. Enrollment limited to 15. B. Fra-Molinero.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

SPAN 457. Senior Thesis.

A capstone project, which may take the form of a written research paper, literary or cultural analysis, translation project, creative project, or digital portfolio, designed in consultation with the faculty advisor. Students register for SPAN 457 in the fall semester. Majors writing an honors thesis register for both SPAN 457 and 458. A detailed outline and bibliography must be approved by the department. [W3] Normally offered every year. Staff.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

SPAN 458. Senior Thesis.

A continuation of SPAN 457. Majors writing an honors thesis register for both SPAN 457 and 458. [W3] Normally offered every year. Staff.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

Short Term Courses

BC/SP s23. Intersection of Biomedicine and Human Rights: The Case of the Chilean Mining Experience.

This course explores the intersections between natural scientific inquiry and cultural studies. Through historical, scientific, cultural, Literary and bioethical lenses, students examine biomedical science in Latin America and the struggle for civil, human, and health rights by workers in the Chilean mining industry since the nineteenth century. The study of historical and cultural narratives alongside the application of the scientific approach to problem solving and laboratory experimentation provide students with a foundation for further on-site examination the impact of scientific practices on human populations, and the intererconnectedness of state policy, public health, and human welfare. Prerequisite(s): SPAN 210. Enrollment limited to 17. Instructor permission is required. [S] [Q] T. Lawson, C. Aburto Guzmán.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

SPAN s30. Escritura creativa: Cuento.

This course combines reading and intensive writing. Students read carefully selected short stories in order to gain an understanding of the genre and to apply what they learn to their own craft. The focus is on the fundamentals of short fiction writing: structure, plot, voice, point of view, description, and dialogue. Class meetings follow a workshop format, with writing exercises, class discussions, and in-depth critique of students' writing. Prerequisite(s): one 200-level Spanish course above 205. Enrollment limited to 15. F. López.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

SPAN s50. Independent Study.

Students, in consultation with a faculty advisor, individually design and plan a course of study or research not offered in the curriculum. Course work includes a background research reflective component, evaluation, and completion of an agreed-upon product. Sponsorship by a faculty member in the department, a course prospectus, and permission of the chair are required. Students may register for no more than one independent study during a Short Term. Staff.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations