Campus events: Feb. 1–28, 2019

Choreographer Amira Sackett presents a solo performance titled “We’re Muslim, Don’t Panic” at Bates on Feb. 5.

Greetings from Bates!

This is a listing of public events at the college during February 2019.

The public is invited to these events. Except as noted, admission is free.

Need directions? Here’s a campus map.

Want the latest events information? Visit the daily Events page.

Can’t attend the game? Watch the livestream:
• Go to gobatesbobcats.com
• Hover over the “Media” tab
• Click the “Livestreams” link and look for your event. (Not all games are livestreamed.)

Questions or comments? Contact events editor Doug Hubley at calendar@bates.edu.


Recurring events

Taking place while Bates is in session. Please confirm before you go.

4:15pm daily | Dharma Society sit: A 20-minute group meditation. Wednesday–Sunday, meditation is silent. Beginners are welcome and orientations provided. FMI abrownel@bates.edu.
Gomes Chapel

6:30pm Mon | Zen meditation led by Associated Buddhist Chaplain Jaime McLeod. Cushions provided, beginners welcome. FMI jaime@treetopzencenter.org.
Gomes Chapel

6pm Wed | Life drawing with the Museum of Art. Dry-media easels and drawing benches provided, bring drawing board and supplies. $10/$9 museum members; $90/$80 for pre-purchased 10-session tickets. FMI 207-786-8302.
Olin 259

9pm Wed | {Pause}: The Multifaith Chaplaincy offers a deeply reflective, secular half-hour of silence, poetry, music, dance and art. FMI 207-786-8272.
Gomes Chapel


1 Fri

7pm | Women’s basketball vs. Hamilton.
Alumni Gym


Bates students are among the performers in the 14th annual F.A.B. Winter Dance Showcase on Feb. 2. (Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College)

2 Sat

1pm | Women’s club hockey vs. Curry.
Norway Savings Bank Arena, 985 Turner St., Auburn

3pm | Women’s basketball vs. Amherst.
Alumni Gym

7pm | Swing and Rumba Ballroom Dance Social: Dance away the evening at a swing and rumba dance social! No dance experience necessary. The first hour will be a quick lesson, and the second will be open dancing. Presented by the Ballroom Team. FMI kcleary@bates.edu.
Chase Hall, Skelton Lounge

7:30pm | F.A.B. Winter Dance Showcase: With its title standing for “Franco American and Bates,” this joyful concert is a collaboration between the college and the Gendron Franco Center. It’s an evening of original dance and music from Bates students and artists around New England — and beyond, including Amirah Sackett (see Feb. 5). $15, available at Vendini. FMI the Franco Center.
Gendron Franco Center, 46 Cedar St.

7:30pm | Student Composers Concert: A program of music by students in a composition course. Free but tickets required: batesconcerts.eventbrite.com. FMI 207-786-6135 or olinarts@bates.edu.
Olin Concert Hall


A location still from “The Grapes of Wrath,” 1940. (Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/2009632217/)

5 Tue

3pm | American Red Cross blood drive: With blood donations always needed, Bates Emergency Medical Services hosts several American Red Cross blood drives every year. Students, faculty, staff and community members are encouraged to donate. FMI jsheltra@bates.edu.
Chase Hall, Memorial Commons

7pm | The Grapes of Wrath: As part of John Ford: 125 years, the Maine Film Center’s statewide celebration of Maine native and legendary film director John Ford, Bates presents Ford’s adaptation of John Steinbeck’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel. Three contemporary issues — climate, migration and economic inequality — permeate this story of Okies escaping the Dust Bowl drought and economic deprivation during the Great Depression. The film netted Ford one of his four Best Director Oscars. Jonathan Cavallero, associate professor of rhetoric, film and screen studies, moderates a post-screening discussion with community leaders and Bates sociologist Marcelle Medford. (1940; 129 min.) FMI www.Ford125.com.
Muskie Archives

7pm | Men’s basketball vs. Maine–Farmington.
Alumni Gym

7:30pm | We’re Muslim, Don’t Panic: The Bates Dance Festival presents a solo performance by dancer-choreographer Amirah Sackett, whom The Huffington Post named one of its “17 Muslim American Women Who Made America Great in 2016.” Known for a spot in rapper Brother Ali’s “Mourning in America” video, Sackett aims to promote understanding and respect: “I wanted to show my religion and the women in it as I know them to be; strong, powerful and beautiful,” Sackett has said. $15: Eventbrite. FMI batesdancefestival.org/upcoming-events/.
Schaeffer Theatre


“The Trinity” is a 2016 inkjet print by Calvin Reedy.

6 Wed

7pm | On Art and Justice: A talk by Calvin Reedy ’17. Known at Bates as an artist who used photography as a primary medium, Reedy is based in New York City, where he maintains his art practice and writes on contemporary art. He is a gallery assistant at Jack Shainman Gallery and, in partnership with the Aperture Foundation, hosts conversations with contemporary photographers, published on Aperture’s social media channels. FMI 207-786-8212.
Olin 104

9pm | {Pause}: The Multifaith Chaplaincy offers a deeply reflective, secular half-hour of silence, poetry, music, dance and art. FMI 207-786-8272.
Gomes Chapel


8 Fri

7pm | Women’s basketball vs. Trinity.
Alumni Gym

8pm | Bates Contradance: Bates’ monthly contradance returns with music by Jesse Ball, Eileen O’Grady and Dana Hartshorn, providing fun, modern and lively tunes and grooves sure to get you out of your chair. Calling by the talented Maggie Robinson. All dances taught and beginners are wildly encouraged to join the fun — no experience necessary. Beginner lesson at 7:45pm, dancing 8–10:45pm. Suggested donation $5–$8 for the general public (free for Bates students). FMI freewillfolk@gmail.com.
Muskie Archives


The Atlantic Brass Quintet performs at Bates Feb. 9 as part of the Olin Concert Series.

9 Sat

10:30am | D4D On the Road Workshop: Learn to have an impact on pressing public policy issues like mass incarceration, immigration, and race & inequality. A Project Pericles initiative, Debating for Democracy (D4D) on the Road is a high-energy workshop for novices and seasoned activists alike. Learn tactics and strategies for issue-based campaigns. Develop skills to analyze power dynamics. Work effectively for change! Register at Eventbrite. FMI 207-786-6202.
Commons 226

1pm | Women’s club hockey vs. UMass–Lowell.
Location TBA

7:30pm | Atlantic Brass Quintet: Celebrated for its masterful and energized presentations of repertoire spanning five centuries and a breadth of styles, this ensemble has performed in 48 of the 50 states and in dozens of countries. The Olin Concert Series program includes works by Witold Lutoslawski, J.S. Bach, Robert Patterson and others, as well as a compilation of Balkan dance music. $15: batesconcerts.eventbrite.com. FMI 207-786-6135 or olinarts@bates.edu.
Olin Concert Hall


10 Sun

11am | Women’s club hockey vs. University of New England.
Androscoggin Bank Colisée, 190 Birch St.


Environmental scientist and author Michael SanClements will give a presentation at Bates on plastic and pollution reduction.

11 Mon

4:15pm | Networked Communication, Activism, and Social Change: The Rise of Networked Counterpublics. A talk by Brooke Foucault Welles, associate professor of communication and network science at Northeastern University. Foucault Welles, who studies how online communication networks enable and constrain behavior, will argue that social media platforms such as Twitter create unique opportunities for traditionally excluded voices to challenge the terms of public debate. Sponsored by the Program in Digital & Computational Studies. FMI cmoran@bates.edu.
Pettengill G52

5:30pm | Women’s basketball vs. Southern Maine.
Alumni Gym

7pm | Our Plastic Lives: How Did We Get Here and What Can We Do? A talk by Michael SanClements, an environmental scientist at the National Ecological Observatory Network and the author of Plastic Purge — a book that, using rigorous sources and a witty engaging tone, teaches us how to use less plastic, eat better, keep dangerous toxins out of our bodies and reduce pollution. FMI jbelive2@bates.edu.
Pettengill G52

7:30pm | Men’s basketball vs. Southern Maine.
Alumni Gym


12 Tue

8pm | Computers, Music & the Arts: The first of the semester’s two concerts of work by students in the course “Computers, Music & the Arts.” Free but tickets required: batesconcerts.eventbrite.com. FMI 207-786-6135 or olinarts@bates.edu.
Olin Concert Hall


13 Wed

9pm | {Pause} See Feb. 6.
Gomes Chapel


16–24 Sat–Sun

Winter Recess: No classes are held, but administrative offices remain open.


22 Fri

9am | Alpine skiing hosts Bates Carnival/NCAA East Regional.
Sunday River, Newry

9am | Nordic skiing hosts Bates Carnival/NCAA East Regional.
Black Mountain, Rumford


23 Sat

9am | Alpine skiing hosts Bates Carnival/NCAA East Regional.
Sunday River, Newry

9am | Nordic skiing hosts Bates Carnival/NCAA East Regional.
Black Mountain, Rumford


25 Mon

4:15pm | Havana’s Noise and Rhythm: Understanding Afro-Cubaneity. A talk by Afro-Cuban hip-hop producer Pablo Herrera Veitia, a doctoral candidate in social anthropology at the University of St Andrews, Scotland, and the 2018–19 Nasir Jones Fellow at the Hutchins Center for African & African American Research at Harvard. FMI dbegin@bates.edu.
Pettengill G21

7pm | Participatory Ethics: The Arts Challenge Us to Examine Our Behaviors. A panel discussion related to the Bates Museum of Art exhibition Anthropocenic. Comprising the panel are exhibiting artists Eve Andree Laramee, Julie Poitras Santos and Adriane Herman; Laura Sewall, director of the Bates–Morse Mountain Conservation Area; and Paul Schofield, visiting assistant professor of philosophy. FMI 207-786-6158 or museum@bates.edu.
Olin 104


27 Wed

6pm | Tens Across the Board: The Glam Slam at the Nuyorican Poets Cafe. A talk by Karen Jamie, assistant professor of performing and media arts and Latina/o studies at Cornell University. Sponsored by the American studies program. FMI dbegin@bates.edu.
Pettengill G65

7:15pm | Transgender Military Service in Brazil: A talk by Bruna Benevides, the first trans woman to serve openly in the Brazilian Armed Forces. She holds the rank of 2nd sergeant in the Brazilian Navy and has served for more than 21 years. As a human-rights advocate, Benevides is the first trans woman honored as Woman Citizen by the State Assembly of Rio de Janeiro. She is a founding member of the Brazilian National Network of Public Security Officers, president of the Municipal LGBT Council of Niteroi, R.J., and secretary of the National Association of Transvestites and Transsexuals. FMI cmoran@bates.edu.
Chase Hall, Memorial Commons

9pm | {Pause} See Feb. 6.
Gomes Chapel


Presented by Literary Arts Live, poet francine j. harris will present a reading of her work on Feb. 28, followed by conversation and a book signing.

28 Thu

7:30pm | francine j. harris, poet. Writer in residence at Washington University, harris is the author of play dead, winner of a Lambda Literary Award and the Audre Lorde Award for Lesbian Poetry, and allegiance, a finalist for the Kate Tufts Discovery Award and the PEN Open Book Award. A reading, conversation and book signing presented by Literary Arts Live. FMI dcutten@bates.edu.
Muskie Archives


Museum of Art

bates.edu/museum
museum@bates.edu

Through March 23

Anthropocenic: Art About the Natural World in the Human Era: Has the Holocene, the geological period that began around 12,000 years ago, been replaced by the Anthropocene — an epoch defined as one in which the human impact on the world is marking the geologic evidence? This compelling group exhibition features art about the natural world and our effects on and interrelation with it in the 21st century.

Amy Stacey Curtis: Time and Place: Curtis is recognized for her ambitious and interactive sculpture installations. This show, however, focuses on her drawings, which nevertheless illustrate her fascination with themes of order, chaos and repetition. These graphic works provide an intimate and personal approach to her continued examination of interconnectedness.

Peter Turnley: Refugees: Known for documenting the human condition, photojournalist Turnley has depicted some of the world’s most significant conflicts. This exhibition, drawn from the permanent collection, focuses on refugee populations around the world.

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