We had a busy month. Students (first-year and returning) arrived on campus to great fanfare; new friends were made, old friends met again.

Classes began — and so did the sports season, with games and practices. And the weather flip-flopped from pouring rain to blissful sunshine to the first light frost of the autumn.

From smiles and laughter, to victories and new beginnings, to unconventional classroom adventures, here’s a selection of photographs that offer a window into This Month at Bates.

So Glad You’re Here

Move-In Day scenes on Aug. 31, 2022, as members of the Class of 2026 arrive on campus with their families.

OWLS Linnea Selendy ’23 and Eva Wu ’25 greet arriving students and their families as they pull up in their vehicles on the Alumni Walk side of Commons.
Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College

As the Class of 2026 rolled onto campus, students and their families were met by returning students with signs welcoming them to their new home, including OWLS Linnea Selendy ’23 and Eva Wu ’25, who held their handmade signs outside Commons.


Facetime

“It was so wonderful to have my family come down. We drove all the way from Chicago. We were very tired. And a little anxious about the move. But once we saw the photo booth and got a little bit more comfortable with everyone here and all the encouragement and welcome, we had so much fun creating these memories as my parents probably won’t be around until graduation. So we get to see where I’m starting. And I’m very excited to see where I end up at the end of it.”— First-year student Nailah Estrada of Chicago, a member of the Bobcat First Program (B1st), enjoys a photo booth session with her younger sister Maricela and their parents Simon and Maricela in the Benjamin Mays Center.The activity afforded B1st participants the chance to create lifetime memories with the production of instant photography during the Parents Sessions held on the first day of the Bobcat First Pre-Orientation Program that runs from Aug.28-30.The Bobcat First Program fosters the success of first-generation college students through co-curricular activities, events, workshops, and peer connections. They create a welcoming environment and strive to develop all of their students into life-long learners.Program participants will gain knowledge and skills that will empower them to grow academically, personally, and professionally.B1st is committed to supporting the dreams of students and provides opportunities for academic development and learning experiences both inside and outside of the classroom. The program builds community while helping students to feel a sense of belonging. The program is guided by Dr. Ray Grant, the Assistant Dean for First Generation and Bobcat First Programs.Swipe left to see more photographs from the pre-orientation first two days, including a welcome from President Clayton Spencer, sessions on academics, financial aid, and student life, and community building activities.
Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College

President Clayton Spencer takes an opportunity to chat with a student during the Bobcat First Pre-Orientation Program on Aug. 28–30, which was full of opportunities for students to connect with other students, and faces they’ll be seeing a lot in the next few years.


Make Way for Bobcats!

Convocation is the academic ceremony marking the start of the new year.This morning, the new Bates students went from Alumni Walk to the Historic Quad, where they passed before Hathorn Hall — cheered by members of the women’s soccer team — and then down the walkway to their seats in front of Coram Library.Swipe left for images from today’s Convocation.Their path got them to the right place at the right time. But don’t always let paths determine your route through life, said Professor of Economics Daniel Riera-Crichton, today’s Convocation speaker.His advice to the newest Bates students: Try to step off what you think is the “right” route as you go through Bates. “Caminante, son tus huellas el camino y nada más; Caminante, no hay camino, se hace camino al andar,” Riera-Crichton said, quoting his favorite poet, Antonio Machado, from his Spanish homeland. Translated to English: “Traveler, your footprints are the only road, nothing else; Traveler, there is no road, you make your own path as you walk.”“Machado, probably referring to life itself, told us that there is no predefined path ahead of us, but just the one we weave ourselves with our choices. “This, I believe, also applies to the spirit of a liberal arts education,” Riera-Crichton said.Also speaking to the new class this morning were President Clayton Spencer; Student Government co-presidents Ali Manning ’23 of Sydney, Australia, and Kush Sharma ’23 of Kush Sharma of New Delhi, India; and the Rev. Brittany A. Longsdorf, the college’s multifaith chaplain, who offered the ceremony’s benediction.Afterward, Longsdorf and Associate Multifaith Chaplain Raymond Clothier led the annual gathering honoring the memory of Bates people who have died during the year past. Held in Gomes Chapel, it concluded as attendees walked outside and each poured cups of water from Lake Andrews onto the roots of a newly planted sapling, a maple. The ritual, said Clothier, honors the unending cycle of “dying, embodying memory, and nurturing new life.”
Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College

Donning plastic ponchos and heralded by the cheers of the women’s soccer team, the Class of 2026 marched from Alumni Walk to the Historic Quad and in front of Coram Library, where Convocation officially welcomed them as brand-new Bobcats.


Laugh Your Hat Off

“It was so wonderful to have my family come down. We drove all the way from Chicago. We were very tired. And a little anxious about the move. But once we saw the photo booth and got a little bit more comfortable with everyone here and all the encouragement and welcome, we had so much fun creating these memories as my parents probably won’t be around until graduation. So we get to see where I’m starting. And I’m very excited to see where I end up at the end of it.”— First-year student Nailah Estrada of Chicago, a member of the Bobcat First Program (B1st), enjoys a photo booth session with her younger sister Maricela and their parents Simon and Maricela in the Benjamin Mays Center.The activity afforded B1st participants the chance to create lifetime memories with the production of instant photography during the Parents Sessions held on the first day of the Bobcat First Pre-Orientation Program that runs from Aug.28-30.The Bobcat First Program fosters the success of first-generation college students through co-curricular activities, events, workshops, and peer connections. They create a welcoming environment and strive to develop all of their students into life-long learners.Program participants will gain knowledge and skills that will empower them to grow academically, personally, and professionally.B1st is committed to supporting the dreams of students and provides opportunities for academic development and learning experiences both inside and outside of the classroom. The program builds community while helping students to feel a sense of belonging. The program is guided by Dr. Ray Grant, the Assistant Dean for First Generation and Bobcat First Programs.Swipe left to see more photographs from the pre-orientation first two days, including a welcome from President Clayton Spencer, sessions on academics, financial aid, and student life, and community building activities.
Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College

First-year student Nailah Estrada of Chicago, a member of Bobcat First, enjoys a photo booth session with her younger sister Julissa and their parents Simon and Maricela in the Benjamin Mays Center.

Everyone involved in Bobcast First had a chance to create their first Bates memories in late August.


Secret Sauce

Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College

The three head coordinators of the 2022 edition of AESOP get doused with the traditional “secret sauce” at the high-energy kickoff gathering for the long running Orientation program for first-year students.

From left, Khadeeja Qureshi ’23 of Princeton, N.J., a double major in politics and English; Sam Faasen ’23 of Dover, N.H., a double major in math and neuroscience; and Ayah Ghazi ’23, a neuroscience major from Canton, Mass.


Class on the Grass

Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College

“It was a great day to be talking under the trees,” said Associate Professor of History Joe Hall, describing the first meeting of his First-Year Seminar, “This Land is Whose Land?” on the Historic Quad.

Each year, the initial sessions of all First-Year Seminars take place during Orientation, before the official start of classes, giving new strudents a head start on connecting with each other and their instructors, who also serve as their first-year advisers.


Group Grins

They are plugged into local work!

Bonner Leaders Kara Neal '25 of Washington, D.C., and Honolulu; Robert Washburne '26 of Madison, Conn.; Sivani Arvapalli '26 of South Windsor, Conn.; and Anzal Isaak '26 of Lewiston, Maine, posed for a group portrait this afternoon outside of the Bates Volunteer Fair held in the Bardwell Street Tent. Pettengill Hall provides a backdrop.

Sponsored by the @harwardcenter for Community Partnerships, annual gathering provides Bates students with the opportunity to meet local organizations and learn about opportunities in the community.

Swipe left for additional scenes including Bates students, faculty, and staff along with members of the local community.

The Bonner Leader Program is an opportunity for students with a passion for community service and civic engagement. They spend four fours each week working with community partners in the Lewiston/Auburn area.
Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College

With Pettengill Hall as a backdrop, Bonner Leaders Kara Neal ’25 of Washington, D.C., and Honolulu; Robert Washburne ’26 of Madison, Conn.; Sivani Arvapalli ’26 of South Windsor, Conn.; and Anzal Isaak ’26 of Lewiston, Maine, pose for a group picture during the annual Bates Volunteer Fair, sponsored by the Harward Center for Community Partnerships.


All for One

A remarkable seven decades worth of Bobcat harriers descended upon the Bates College campus Saturday (some for the first time in years) as the institution's storied cross-country program came together to celebrate the 50th annual Alumni Meet.
Before the meet began, head women's and men's track and field coach Curtis Johnson spoke to the attendees.

"I want to thank you all for joining us for the 50th annual running of the Alumni race," Johnson said. "Bates is making a lot of upgrades that we're proud about. The biggest thing I can say is that a lot of this is because of all of you. So, I want to thank you all for helping to celebrate this moment. This is a true testament of the Bates community. How we always give back, we support, we show up consistently. And, regardless of when you graduated, you get a chance to show that you are a Bobcat forever."

Nearly 100 alumni donned the garnet and white and toed the starting line for this historic event, a group speckled with participants from the very first outing way back in 1973.
Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College

From left to right: Vanessa Paolella ’21, Alison Leonard ’10, and Kathryn Moore ’07 race together towards the finish line, holding hands, at the 50th annual Bates cross country alumni meet on September 3. Alums and current Bobcats from both the women’s and men’s programs gathered on campus for a tradition that brings together seven decades of Bates cross country runners.


Bucking Bronco

Matt Hamilton ‘25 for Bates College

Bateschella was a smashing success, obviously. Besides trying their balance (and stick-to-itiveness) at bucking bronco on the mechanical unicorn, Bates students enjoyed musical performances from fellow students and guest groups, axe throwing, a bungee run, a photo booth, and plenty of poutine.


Sign Me Up

Matt Hamilton ‘25 for Bates College

More than 80 clubs and organizations were excited to welcome students to Bates and their communities at the 2022 Clubs and Orgs Fair on Sept. 7. High energy was the order of the evening, as students got a firsthand look at some of the student communities they could join, and interests they could foster.


Tee’d up for Success

Photography of Bates College Women and Men’s Golf at Martindale Country Club in Auburn on September 27, 2022. (Theophil Syslo | Bates College)
Theophil Syslo/Bates College

Ruby Haylock ’26 of Hartford, Maine, swings through during a practice session for the Bates men’s and women’s golf teams at the Martindale Country Club in Auburn. Already a top Bates golfer, Haylock won the Maine Women’s Amateur Championship twice in the past three years.


Decompression Session

“It’s mindfulness for college.”

—Fiki Hunt ’24 of New York City, a double major in psychology and film, joins neuroscience major Luke Janak ’24 of Blauvelt, N.Y., for golden hour on the Historic Quad. After tossing a frisbee, they sat down to take some time “to decompress from classes,” Hunt said.
Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College

Golden hour pairs nicely with a little frisbee and some conversation. Fiki Hunt ’24 of New York City, a double major in psychology and film, joins neuroscience major Luke Janak ’24 of Blauvelt, N.Y., take a moment to “decompress from classes,” said Hunt.


Puppy Love

Cats Carnival, held for the first time in two years, was held on the Bardwell Street Field, on Saturday, Sept. 24, 2022.

After Two-Year Hiatus, 'Cats Carnival Returns This Saturday
The fall-themed 'Cats Carnival, hosted by Bates College Athletics, returns after a two-year hiatus this Saturday just before the Bates Football home opener vs. Tufts at 1:30 p.m. on Garcelon Field. 
The carnival features bounce houses, face painting, poster making, a prize wheel, concessions, and games for kids of all ages. Bates student-athletes will volunteer at the family-friendly event. The 'Cats Carnival is free and open to the public. 

Bates Athletics invites community members to join the fun and to cheer on the Bobcats in all their home contests. Admission to all games is free.

Kirsten Pelletier ’20 and her four-month-old-chocolate Lab Goose enjoy a photo opportunity with the Bates Bobcat.
Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College

This ’cat and pup seem to get along just fine as Kirsten Pelletier ’20 and her four-month-old-chocolate Lab Goose grab a pic with the Bates Bobcat during the ’Cats Carnival, right before the Bates football team’s home opener against Tufts.


A Little Peace

“Peace begins with us.”

That was the theme of this year’s United World College Day that a group of Davis United World Scholars at Bates celebrated by gathering with staff from the Center for Global Education in front of Roger Williams Hall. 
UWC Day is the annual global celebration of the UWC mission and values, which takes place on Sept. 21 every year, to coincide with the UN International Day of Peace. Each year, UWC Day is celebrated by thousands of people worldwide, including students and staff at UWC schools and colleges, national committees, UWC alumni and friends.

 Associate Dean for International Student Programs James Reese likes to recognize the day at Bates with a photograph and gathering.

The spirit of friendship was in the air as students broke up from their large group to exchange hugs and words with classmates. Newcomers Rosina Makwabe ’26 of Arusha, Tanzania, and Verina Chatata ’26 of Blantyre, Malawi, who met at Bates, laughed and hugged. “I’m happy to have a friend,” Makwabe said.

A $5 million scholarship gift to Bates College has expanded access for talented international students who come to Bates from the highly respected secondary schools of the United World Colleges movement.
The gift, from Jonathan Blair Frank ‘89 and Tena Fishman Frank ’89, provides need-based financial aid for UWC students at Bates under the Davis United World College Scholars Program.
The world’s largest international undergraduate scholarship initiative, the Davis UWC Scholars Program is dedicated to bringing together “promising students from diverse cultures and supporting their undergraduate educations at selected American colleges and universities…to create greater international understanding among the world’s future decision makers.”
Bates is among 99 U.S. colleges and universities that have partnered with the Davis UWC Scholars Program, which helps provide college access to 3,800 students from 165 nations.
(Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College)

Yvonne Chu ’25 of Changzhou, China, with Alan Wang ’24 of Henan, China
Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College

“Peace begins with us.”

Miguel Angel Pacheco ’24 of Caracas, Venezuela, leans in for a hug with Associate Dean for International Student Programs James Reese, during a gathering of Davis United World Scholars in celebration for this year’s United World College Day. 


Tip-Top View

“I wanted to give her the college tree experience.”

— Elizabeth Nahigian ’26 of Needham, Mass., explains why she took sister Emma, 14, up a tree behind Lane Hall for an opportunity to catch up on Saturday afternoon. Elizabeth had climbed this very tree with Bates friends and wanted to do the same with Emma.

“We had fun,” she said, as they disembarked to meet their parents.

Swipe left for a few other photographs of siblings on Saturday of Back to Bates weekend. And watch for more coverage later this week.

Looking forward to the Back to Bates Alumni Weekend on Oct. 15.
Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College

“I wanted to give her the college tree experience,” said Elizabeth Nahigian ’26 of Needham, Mass., explaining why she took sister Emma, 14, up a tree behind Lane Hall for an opportunity to catch up during the Back to Bates weekend. Elizabeth had climbed this very tree with Bates friends and wanted to do the same with Emma.


Leaping Start

Moments from the Bates College Men’s and Women's Cross Country Bates Invitational on September 17, 2022. (Theophil Syslo | Bates College)
Theophil Syslo /Bates College

And they’re off! Bates and Tufts runners take off to start the Bates Invitational meet on Sept. 17.


Learning Never Stops

Campus on the afternoon of Sept. 13, 2022.

Verified
“It’s the other way around. He’s the teacher, and I’m learning from him.”

— Associate Professor of English Sanford Freedman, in response to the question “Are you his adviser?”

Freedman and Pico Banerjee ’23 of Morristown, N.J., spoke on the stairway between Pettengill and Lane halls.

Banerjee’s pursuing a yearlong honors thesis on anti-fascist thought and writing from between World War I and World War II under Freedman’s supervision.
Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College

“It’s the other way around. He’s the teacher, and I’m learning from him,” said Associate Professor of English Sanford Freedman, in response to the question “Are you his adviser?” 

Freedman is the adviser for Pico Banerjee ’23 of Morristown, N.J., as Banerjee pursues a yearlong honors thesis on anti-fascist thought and writing from between World War I and World War II. 


Cote Connection

Bates Field Hockey defeats Bowdoin 2-1 in the home opener on Sept. 10, 2022.
Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College

A perfectly executed penalty corner had Paige Cote ‘24 of Auburn, Maine, jumping for joy after seeing her shot get tipped into the net by her sister Anna Cote ‘25 during the Bobcats’ thrilling win vs. Bowdoin on Sept. 10.


Nice Drip

“Sometimes when you lose your way in the fog, you end up in a beautiful place! Don’t be afraid of getting lost!”

— Mehmet Murat Ildan

Scenes from Lake Andrews and vicinity earlier this morning, the second day of classes, featuring fog, spider webs, and water droplets.

(Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College) #batescollege #september #fog #lewiston #maine
Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College

“Sometimes when you lose your way in the fog, you end up in a beautiful place! Don’t be afraid of getting lost!” — Mehmet Murat Ildan

Glittering water droplets drape a spiderweb near Lake Andrews, as the morning fog lifts on the second day of classes.


It’s a Breeze

“It’s amazing being on campus again.”

— Jamil Mouehla ’25, an economics major and a mathematics minor from Harrington Park, N.J., and a running back for the football team

Stopping for a photograph on the Historic Quad, he talked about finding close friends on the team and in his classes. And he’s found extracurricular life here, too, in the Caribbean Students Association (CSA), the Black Student Union (BSU), and the Africana Club.

Today reminded him of fall. “I feel as if we’ve been getting a lot of summer. The fall is probably what makes Bates so special,” he said. “And the breeze. I love it. At home it was very hot.”

Another sign of fall: Mouehla and the Bates football team open their season Saturday at 1 p.m. against Wesleyan in Middletown, Conn.
Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College

“It’s amazing being on campus again,” said Jamil Mouehla ’25, an economics major from Harrington Park, N.J., as he breathed in the mid-September air while stopping for a photo on the Historic Quad. “The fall is probably what makes Bates so special,” he said. “And the breeze. I love it.”


Divine Vision

Multifaith Chaplain and Lecturer in the Humanities Brittany Longsdorf takes her first-year-seminar FYS 532, “Arts and Spirituality: Art Making and Aesthetic Experience as Conduits for Reflection and Connection” for a visit to the Museum of Art’s Pedagogy Exhibition, on Sept. 22, 2022. Peter Philbin, assistant museum curator, hosted the group.The student participated in a “Visio Divina” that translates into “Sacred Looking” and says Longsdofr in a handout to the students, “ is a way to engage any visual art a a source of sacred connection. Visio Davina has been practiced for thousands of years in several different spiritual traditions and is rooted in the belief that the Divine is everywhere. The rocks and stoned and oceans and paintings and dancers and sculptors are all showing us new expressions of the spiritual realm among us if we only look with Sacred Sight. Find some quiet time, a half an hour works well, and follow these Visio Divina instructions to embrace some art-based spiritual practice. (See photo in PhotoShelter gallery for instructions).
Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College

Breathe deeply, reflect wholly through “Visio Divina.”

At the Bates Museum of Art, Multifaith Chaplain and Lecturer in the Humanities Brittany Longsdorf guided her students in “sacred looking” as part of Longsdorf’s First-Year Seminar “Arts and Spirituality.”

Visio Divina is translated as “divine seeing,” and is like prayer. But instead of scripture, this form of prayer uses visual elements to help center one’s mind.


Catch a Few Rays

Technically it's still summer, as the fall equinox doesn't actually arrive until tonight, Sept. 21, 2022, at 9:04 p.m. EDT in the Northern Hemisphere.

As far as Sophia Cattalani '25 of Skaneateles, N.Y,, is concerned, it's summer's last hurrah.

Seated on the Keigwin Amphitheater, Cattalani was at work on an assignment for her Spanish class in "Race and Nation in the Ibero/American World" taught by Assistant Professor of Spanish Stephanie Pridgeon.

"It's probably one of the last sunny and warm days for a while," she said. "She wanted to enjoy a Puddle-side study session while she still could. "Before the whole thing is covered in snow."
Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College

Hours before the official end of summer was heralded by the fall equinox, Sophia Cattalani ’25 of Skaneateles, N.Y., chose to enjoy her summer’s last hurrah by sitting in the sun at the Keigwin Amphitheater to work on an assignment for her Spanish class in “Race and Nation in the Ibero/American World” taught by Assistant Professor of Spanish Stephanie Pridgeon. 

“It’s probably one of the last sunny and warm days for a while,” she said. She wanted to enjoy a Puddle-side study session while she still could, “before the whole thing is covered in snow.”


Grand Opening

Open house for the Center for Inclusive Teaching and Learning, hosted by Lindsey Hamilton ’04 (in green jacket).

Lindsey Hamilton joined the Bates community as the inaugural Director of the Center for Inclusive Teaching and Learning, with a start date of August 15th, 2022. 

Hamilton comes to Bates having provided visionary leadership at the Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning at the University of Colorado — Denver. With expertise in inclusive pedagogy, including the effective use of high impact, evidence based techniques, Lindsey is known as a creative and expansive thinker.  She is also a Bates College alumna, receiving her B.S. in Neuroscience in 2004. She received her Ph.D. in Neuroscience from Wake Forest University in 2010, after which she joined the faculty at the University of Colorado Denver.

Also present were Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the Faculty Malcolm Hill, Professor of Psychology and Associate Dean of the Faculty Krista Aronson (red glasses), Associate Professor of Mathematics Katharine Ott (black shirt) and Senior Academic Technology Consultant
Shauna'h Fuegen, Information & Library Services  (rust-colored sweater).
Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College

The Center for Inclusive Teaching and Learning is now open! Lindsey Hamilton ’04, the inaugural Director of the Center for Inclusive Teaching and Learning, hosted an open house for the center on the second floor of Dana, the center’s base of operations.


Say Cheese!

Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College

In Assistant Professor of biology Lori Banks’ CURE course (Course-based Undergraduate Research Experiences), “Living in a Microbial World,” things got a little cheesy as the classroom transformed into a cheese tasting room.

Bates alumni Greg Bernhardt ’99 and Hannah Sessions ’99 joined the class to talk about how their time at Bates led to the creation of their dairy farm, Blue Ledge Farm, in Leicester, Vt., and how the path forward can be anything but clear and conventional. Bernhardt had one piece of advice for the students-slash-budding-cheesemakers: “You have to make something you love. It’s sort of like writing a paper for a professor; if you don’t love it, they won’t either.”

Students munched on crackers and a variety of cheeses, including two created by Banks and two of her colleagues: Beth Malachowsky, a research technician in the biology department; and Assistant in Instruction Amy McDonough. Throughout the course, students will reverse-engineer the cheesemaking process, based on the two selections.


Raise Your Flag

"Visibility is my method of reclaiming my authentic identity and gaining confidence and pride in it."
 
— SPARK Peer Mentor Ruslan Peredelskyi '25 of Donetsk, Ukraine, (center) raising the Progress Pride Flag at the Garcelon Field Flag Pole with Mason Bunker '23, also a SPARK Peer Mentor, and campus safety office Jim Miclon.
 
Assistant Dean for LGBTQ+ Programs with the Office of Intercultural Education Dri Hubner conceived of the idea of raising the flag for Coming Out Week. A Bates crowd watched and cheered as Huber and Peredelskyi spoke to those who gathered.
 
"This is finding freedom after years of hiding who I really am from my family and friends," Peredelskyi said. He called the flag raising an opportunity to remember members of the LGBTQIA+ community who fought for freedom and an opportunity to advocate now.
 
“This is a privilege, as my friends who stayed in Ukraine do not have the opportunity to come out without risking their security,” he said. “Coming Out Week is here to remind us about liberty to be seen and heard, and propels us to embrace it to fight inequailty and discrimination that still exists around the globe."
 
SPARQ is a network of resources sponsored by the OIE that strive to support students’ positive development of gender, (a)sexuality, and (a)romantic identity. The network offers peer mentoring, ally education, and targeted programming focused on specific LGBTQ+ identities accessible to the entire Bates community. Through these resources, SPARQ will provide a consistent presence which aspires to foster a true sense of safety for LGBTQ+ and questioning students.
 
(Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College) #batescollege #comingoutweek #pride #visibility
Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College

“This is finding freedom after years of hiding who I really am from my family and friends,” said Ruslan Peredelskyi ’25 (center) of Donetsk, Ukraine, during today’s flag raising at the Garcelon Field to celebrate Coming Out Week.

He was joined by Mason Bunker ’23 of New York City and Campus Safety officer Jim Miclon.

Peredekskyi and Bunker are peer mentors for the SPARQ program at Bates, a network of resources that strives to support students’ positive development of gender, (a)sexuality, and (a)romantic identity.


(Mock) Election Season

The two campaigns are unaffiliated. “Getting rid of labels makes people think twice about what they’re hearing. Voters will have to engage with the issues,” Stephanie Kelley-Romano said. The campaigns will focus on four issues. At the beginning of the course, students had to decide for themselves, “What kind of campaign do you want to run? The goal of the course is to increase the quality of public discourse,” and the campaigns will have to decide how to solve the challenges of “balancing responsible discourse with winning,” Kelley-Romano said. What behaviors are required to actually win? 

At 12:15 p.m. on Monday, Oct. 3, mock presidential candidate “Teal Baker” (Jem Costello ’23) accepted the nomination of his “party” at the “national nominating convention.”He was introduced by his wife, “XX Baker” (Scarlet Wang). His running mate, VP candidate XX XX (Gabby Alpert ’23) accepted her nomination and spoke. Campaign manager waving flags is Chris Cimino, and the director of campaign communications is Jessie Gross ’23.  “Matthew Baker,” the couple’s son is played by Ollie Rhee.

#mockcampaign #pcr2022

RFSS391B is Presidential Campaign Rhetoric, and as we study speeches/campaigning in a traditional senior-seminar format, we simultaneously run a mock campaign so students have the opportunity to practice and hone their rhetorical skills. 


So, this year, we have two candidates: James Teal and Olivia Wells vying for the Presidency.  Each campaign has a campaign manager, social media director, vice-presidential candidate, speech writer, social media coordinator, etc.  Each campaign will be trying to earn YOUR vote. You absolutely do not HAVE to vote. If you want to be removed from the voting roster, please just respond to this email. 


There is also a group of students who are THE MEDIA – they may write from the left, right, or center. They maintain social media accounts, put out news stories, cover various events, and may at some point dig up some dirt on the candidates. Stay tuned! 


Last week, the candidates announced their intention to run. Now, they will host campaign events, have national conventions, make ads, have debates, and respond to world events. Voting day will be the same day as the national election – Tuesday November 8th. On that day, you will be asked to cast a vote as to who you would vote for, and you will also be asked to vote for who you believe ran a better campaign.  


In early December, we will host an inaugural ball to which all voters and people who helped with the campaigns will be invited.  There, we will hear the winning candidate’s inaugural speech, eat some yummy food, dance, and celebrate the semester! 


Please, get involved – be an informed voter!!  Thank you for participating!
Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College

Bates students are kicking off a mock presidential election — with no party lines. The campaign is a part of “Presidential Campaign Rhetoric,” a course taught by Professor of Rhetoric, Film, and Screen Studies Stephanie Kelley-Romano every few years.

This year, in an effort to highlight the actual rhetoric and increase the quality of public discourse, the two campaigns will not be affiliated with either of the two major U.S. parties (nor with any other party, whether Greens, Libertarians, or even Whigs.)

‘The Most Normal’

Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College

It’s “back to normal” for seniors Cici Conroy, left, of Ridgefield, Conn, an environmental studies major, and Alice Blackwood ’23, a double major in politics and rhetoric, after they spent the past year apart: Conroy was in Isafjordur, Iceland, studying climate change, and Blackwood was at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland.

They’ve been friends since their first year at Bates, but this was the first full “debrief” they’ve had since returning to Bates. “This is the most normal it’s felt for both of us since we met!” said Blackwood said.

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