We’ve experienced beginnings and ends, rituals and transitions.

Whether it’s launching a ship, finding “the mole,” or hugging a friend to say goodbye or hello, we’ve got something for everyone — moments of accomplishment and affection, from national championships to community partnerships.

It’s our pleasure to share them with you.


Search Is On

Theophil Syslo

Theophil Syslo/Bates College

In Hathorn Hall, Elly Rostoum ’07 (third from left) helps a group of students think through their mole hunt during her practitioner-taught Short Term course, “Spies, Special Agents, and the Presidency.”

The course, which included a simulated search for a mole within the British intelligence service, was designed to “mimic a day in an intelligence officer’s life,” said Rostoum, whose career includes serving on the National Security Council at the White House.


Wisdom’s Women

Clio Barr '19 of Hallowell, Maine, is a STA/RT (SHORT TERM ACTION/RESEARCH TEAM) partner with the Center for Wisdom's Women Herban Works. Her project title is Creating Marketing Materials and a Business Plan for Sophia's House.On the first spring day of the 2019 Lewiston Farmer's Market, Barr sells products on Sunday, May 12, with Judy Maloney garden and production coordinator and volunteer Mary Hopkins, who also helps with harvesting and planting.

Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College

At the spring opening of the Lewiston Farmer’s Market, Clio Barr ’19 of Hallowell, Maine, joins Judy Maloney of the Center for Wisdom’s Women to sell its hand-made healing products.

A member of the Harward Center’s Short Term Action/Research Team, Barr partnered with the center to help support the center’s social enterprise, known as Herban Works.


The Magnificent Magnolia

The Hathorn Hall magnolia tree lets go, and Reed Sandbach ‘20 walks on by.

Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College

The Hathorn Hall magnolia looses its flowers as Reed Sandbach ’20 of San Francisco walks on by.


A Source of Inspiration

World record holding marathon swimmer Pat Gallant-Charette visits Visiting Instructor of Psychology Rebecca Fraser-Thill's Short Term class, "PSYC S39 - Composing a Life: Narrative Identity Development Across the Lifespan," in combination with Associate Professor of Sociology Heidi Taylor's Sociology "Sociology s26:  Life Course and Aging." Pat's visit was supported by the Purposeful Work Infusion Project and held in Olin 104.  Pat didn't pick up swimming until her late 50s and this "is an amazing testament to successful aging," says Fraser-Thill."

Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College

The oldest woman to swim the English Channel, Pat Gallant-Charette (right) talks with faculty members Rebecca Fraser-Thill (center) and Heidi Taylor after speaking to students in their respective Short Term courses, in psychology and sociology, both of which focus on the aging experience.

“Pat didn’t pick up swimming until her late 50s, and she is an amazing testament to successful aging,” says Fraser-Thill.


Launching a Japanese Boat

Students in Douglas Brook’s practitioner-taught Short Term course, “Apprentice Learning: Building the Japanese Boat,” launched their boats in a traditional Japanese boat launching ceremony on the Puddle at 3:30 p.m., a prelude to The Annual Showcase Event for Short Term Redesigns and Practitioner Taught Courses held in the Perry Atrium of Pettengill Hall..

Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College

During a highly ritualized Japanese boat-launching ceremony, students maneuver one of two boats they built during the Short Term course “Apprentice Learning: Building the Japanese Boat.”

“Conducting the rituals brings us closer to nature and closer to something divine,” explained Douglas Brooks, who taught the course and presided over the boat launch. “And that’s it. That’s it.”


Interactive Sound Art

DC/MU s23. Interactive Sound Art.An interdisciplinary course that explores the relationship between interactive technology, sound, and multimedia art in virtual and physical spaces. Students listen to, read about, analyze, and discuss different works of interactive art to probe the relationship among the artist, technology, audience, and artwork. This survey of the historical, theoretical, technical, and conceptual considerations of interactive art serves as a springboard for creating original works using various computer programming languages, hardware, and sensors. Students create multiple new works of interactive sound art that culminate in a final exhibition showcasing their work. Recommended background: some experience in music, digital audio, acoustics, computer programming or digital art. Students who have used Max/MSP or microcontrollers (Arduino, Raspberry Pi, Micro:bit, etc.) are encouraged to enroll. New course beginning Short Term 2019. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 36. One-time offering co-taught by Colony Family Associate Prof erssor of Digital and Computational Studies Matt Jadud and Music Lecturer Gabriel Bolanos. DCS/MUS Interactive Sound Art students in Pettengill Hall's DCS Lounge are preparing for an end-of-semester show in Ladd Library on Tuesday, May 21 from 4:15 to 5:30 p.m. The students have developed sound art installations using electronics, cardboard, and code. Students in photographs: Julia Middlebrook ’21 in denim jacket Andrea Hepfinger ’21 in white sweatshirt Anna Reaman ’22 in blue sweatshirt and red hair Abe Brownell ’20 in black t-shirt Samuel Kroger ‘`9 in blue t-shirt Ryan Strathmann ’22 on grey hoodie Oliver Wan ’22 blue long sleeve tshirt, black glasses

Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College

Oliver Wan ’22 of Hong Kong and Anna Reaman ’22 of Hingham, Mass., work together during the Short Term course “Interactive Sound Art,” which explores the relationship between interactive technology, sound, and multimedia art in virtual and physical spaces.


A New Look

The newly redesigned lobby of Alumni Gymnasium.

Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College

Men’s basketball coach Jon Furbush ’05 steps into the newly redesigned Alumni Gymnasium lobby as he departs the gym. Among several ongoing athletics projects, the redo includes new furnishings, lighting, signage, and trophy cases designed to complement the historic feel of Alumni Gymnasium, opened in 1926


Installing Posterity

Ronald "Ron" Tardif, a facility services mason with the Cutten Maintenance Center at Bates College, places the 'Class of 2018' ivy stone near the entrance of Pettengill Hall on May 22, 2019.

Theophil Syslo/Bates College

“That’s more betterer!” jokes Ron Tardif, a mason with Bates Facility Services, as he installs the Class of 2019 ivy stone. Designed by senior Laura Nguyen, the stone is located next to the Pettengill Hall entrance.

Not satisfied with how the stone looked the first time he placed it, Tardif did extra chiseling to adjust the stone’s fit, and after placing mortar on all four sides and cleaning away the excess, the job was done. Installation of a class ivy stone is a Bates tradition dating to the 1870s.


Double Vision

Four sets of graduating twins, each from the Class of 2019, gather on the historic Quad for portraits.Duane Davis (pink shirt) and Dylan Davis (blue shirt) John Cannon (black pullover) and William “Coley” Cannon (garnet pullover and white hat) Daly Naughton (hoop earrings)and Claire Naughton (blue t-shirt) Mark Fusco (Bates shirt) and Frank Fusco (glasses)

Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College

The Class of 2019’s four sets of twins pose together on the Historic Quad a few days before Commencement. From left, Mark Fusco and Frank Fusco, Daly Naughton and Claire Naughton, John Cannon and William “Coley” Cannon, and Duane Davis and Dylan Davis.


Trail Marker

Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College

Katherine Ennis ’20 of Morristown, N.J., installs temporary trail signage along the David Rancourt River Preserve in Lewiston. One of the Harward Center’s Short Term Action/Research Team members this year, Ennis partnered with the Androscoggin Land Trust on projects that involved helping to rename some of the trust’s trails, which “required considerable communication skills to ensure that everyone was on the same page,” she says.


Numbers Game

Colin Kelley/Bates College

Colin Kelley/Bates College

On the Friday before Commencement, members of the Class of 2019 pose for their official senior class photo on Garcelon Field.


Memorializing the Experience

Laura Nguyen ’19 from Paoli, Pa., I am trying to live up my last few days here at Bates. I’ve wanted to do some oil painting for a really long time, and I figured today was the day. It was beautiful and sunny [when she started earlier in the morning]. Now it’s gotten a little bit cloudy. I feel like it’s symbolic, trying to wrap up my senior year.”What’s uppermost in your mind as you are preparing to leave?“I guess it’s trying to absorb all of Bates before you go and what it actually feels like to be a student here. Because I feel like when you come back to visit it’s a different experience…Painting is really relaxing for me. There’s something about painting the Bates buildings or memorializing that as an experience here at Bates that’s really important to me. It’s very relaxing to me, it’s something I like to do. I was in Penny Jones’ color theory class [during Short Term 2019]. It was really helpful. I’ve been in the artistic, painting mindset so I figured I’d do some other stuff too while I have the time”Russ Dillingham of the Sun Journal also had stopped by to photograph her.

Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College

“It’s symbolic: trying to wrap up my senior year,” says politics major Laura Nguyen ’19 of Paoli, Pa. Inspired by a beautiful morning, she began a painting adventure outside Gomes Chapel.

“I am trying to live up my last few days here at Bates. I’ve wanted to do some oil painting for a really long time, and I figured today was the day.”


Kicking into High Gear

2019 Baccalaureate:Saturday May 25, 2019 2:00 p.m. Historic Quad Francisco "Franky" Urueta of Facility Services delivered the Baccalaureate Address. Baccalaureate is a gathering of graduating seniors and their families and friends to celebrate the journey through Bates and beyond. The service speaks through the languages of many religions and spiritualities, and celebrates with poetry, music, dance, and reflection. Seniors process into the service in their gowns, and all friends and family are welcome to attend. Seating is first-come, first-served on folding chairs. The rain site is in Merrill gym. The procession begins at 1:50, with a musical prelude before. Graduates will process and recess through trellises adorned with “blessing tags” bearing well-wishes from parents and guardians. For those who have not mailed in blessing tags, there will be a table and supplies for creating and hanging the tags before the service.

Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College

Members of the Senior Dance Ensemble show off their talents prior to Baccalaureate. Held the day before Commencement, the event allows seniors and their families and guests to pause for reflection and celebration, including performances and brief addresses, ending with an interfaith blessing.


Baccalaureate Address

2019 Baccalaureate:Saturday May 25, 2019 2:00 p.m. Historic Quad Francisco "Franky" Urueta of Facility Services delivered the Baccalaureate Address. Baccalaureate is a gathering of graduating seniors and their families and friends to celebrate the journey through Bates and beyond. The service speaks through the languages of many religions and spiritualities, and celebrates with poetry, music, dance, and reflection. Seniors process into the service in their gowns, and all friends and family are welcome to attend. Seating is first-come, first-served on folding chairs. The rain site is in Merrill gym. The procession begins at 1:50, with a musical prelude before. Graduates will process and recess through trellises adorned with “blessing tags” bearing well-wishes from parents and guardians. For those who have not mailed in blessing tags, there will be a table and supplies for creating and hanging the tags before the service.

Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College

Selected by the senior class to deliver the annual faculty-staff address at Baccalaureate, Francisco “Franky” Urueta of Facility Services shows his love for the Class of 2019 as he finishes his speech.


Dynasty

INDIANAPOLIS, IN - JUNE 01: Bates College celebrates winning the Division III Women's Rowing Championship held at the Indianapolis Rowing Center on June 1, 2019 in Indianapolis, Indiana. (Photo by Justin Tafoya/NCAA Photos via Getty Images)

Justin Tafoya/NCAA Photos via Getty Images

Head coach Peter Steensta (left) takes a championship selfie with his jubilant rowers during ceremonies honoring Bates as the 2019 NCAA Division III women’s rowing champions.

Winners of the 2019 rowing title in Indianapolis, Bates has captured three straight titles and four out of the last five.


Tied Up in Garnet

Bates College 2019 Commencement (the one hundred and fifty-third) on the Historic Quad, at which Travis Mills receives an Doctor of Humane Letter. Placing the collar on Mills is the college's mace bearer, Charles Franklin Phillips Professor of EconomicsMichael Murray.

Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College

Nicholas Coker ’19 of Narrows, Va., sports a garnet tie and Bates graduation stole as he and classmates line up for the Commencement processional on Alumni Walk.


Family Walk

Lake Andrews at dusk. Professor Jon Baughman circles the Puddle with his family.

Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College

On an early June evening at Lake Andrews, Associate Professor of Rhetoric, Film, and Screen Studies Jon Cavallero and his wife, Kathryn McGill-Cavallero, walk along Burgoyne Walk as their son, Emmett Cavallero, age 2, comes along for the ride.


Reunited and It Feels So Good

Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College)

Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College

As Reunion 2019 kicks off, classmates Anabel Schmelz ’14 and William Pollard ’14 greet one another with a big Bates hug on Alumni Walk.


Reunion Reflections

Phyllis Graber Jensen

Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College

The windows of Hedge Hall reflect the dazzling 2019 Reunion fireworks display taking place over Lane Andrews.

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