Emily McConville

Emily writes and edits content for Bates publications.

Stories by Emily McConville
Bates in the News: May 22, 2020

Thursday, May 21, 2020 4:34 pm

An alumnus monitors Balkan border violence, and two alumnae care for patients' physical and spiritual health in Massachusetts hospitals.

Stacia Poulin, President's House Coordinator/Events AssistantDining, Conferences and Campus Events, prepares a hamburger for Cheryl Lacey on the Commons Grill.Dining Services in CommonsAssociate Professor of Theater Christine McDowell leads a team of Bates students — in residence — as they work in Schaeffer Theatre’s costume shop making coronavirus masks for members of the Bates community. To date, they have provided 340 masks for Dining Services, Security, Facility Services custodians, and Occupational Health and Safety.
By hand-making face masks for Bates workers, students feel ‘part of something’

Thursday, May 21, 2020 3:21 pm

Bates hopes to provide cloth face coverings for every student and employee who needs one. In their new jobs in the costume shop, resident students are contributing hundreds.

Slideshow: Photography gives Bates student unique view of semester in Ghana

Tuesday, May 5, 2020 2:18 pm

“I was able to build relationships with other students, with Ghanaians, with musicians, that I don’t think would have been possible if I hadn’t been pursuing photography.”

Can people’s tweets help find coronavirus outbreaks?

Friday, May 1, 2020 10:55 am

Chris Danforth ’01 of the University of Vermont, who studies emotions through millions of social media posts, noticed a big dip in national mood — and thinks Twitter can prove useful for public health officials.

Bates in the News: April 24, 2020

Friday, April 24, 2020 10:13 am

It's good Bates in the News: On April 17, Jack Allard ’16 left a Philadelphia hospital after a highly publicized weeks-long battle with COVID-19.

Associate Professor of Digital and Computational Studies Carrie Diaz Eaton teaches (in Carnegie 226) her course DCS 105. Calling Bull in a Digital World.Our world is rife with misinformation. This course is designed to hone digital citizenship skills. It is about "calling b***s*** ": spotting, dissecting, and publicly refuting false claims and inferences based on quantitative, statistical, and computational analysis of data (with R). Students explore case studies in policy and science; possible examples include food stamps, caffeine, improving traffic, and gendered mortality rates. Students practice visualizing data; interpreting scientific claims; and spotting misinformation, fake news, causal fallacies, and statistical traps. In so doing, the course offers an introduction to programming. New course beginning Winter 2019. Enrollment limited to 29. [Q] C. Diaz Eaton.
Bates professor Carrie Diaz Eaton wins $300K grant to support open education

Friday, April 24, 2020 8:16 am

Reflecting Bates' leadership in the field, Bates professor Carrie Diaz Eaton and colleagues will use a $300,000 grant from the Hewlett Foundation to create and share free educational materials — with a focus on equity.

Jennifer Koviach-Côté and Joshua Rubin share 2020 Kroepsch teaching award

Friday, April 17, 2020 11:50 am

The winners of this prestigious Bates award discuss the value of confusion, building confidence, and the “joy in a student getting it.”

‘Be gentle with yourself’: teaching and learning in troubled times

Thursday, April 16, 2020 2:01 pm

While the routine of schoolwork can be good for kids, families and teachers should cut themselves a lot of slack, says education professor Anita Charles.

Going virtual, Multifaith Chaplaincy reminds students that ‘you are still a part of this place’

Friday, April 10, 2020 8:40 am

As COVID-19 has forced most students to go home, employees to work remotely, and religious services to move online, the Multifaith Chaplaincy's mission hasn't changed: fostering connection.

‘We’ve always dealt with these issues’: How COVID-19 affects rural schools

Thursday, April 9, 2020 3:34 pm

As schools scramble to provide meals and technology in the pandemic, a Bates scholar looks to the future — and a student school board member makes decisions in the present.

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