Campus events: Oct. 1–31, 2018

“Watering Hole (Social Species in the Late Anthropocene),” a 2017 oil painting by Laurie Hogin, appears in the Museum of Art exhibition Anthropocenic, opening Oct. 27.

Hello from Bates!

This is a listing of public events at the college during October 2018.

The public is invited to these events. Except as noted, admission is free.

Need directions? Here’s a campus map.

Want the latest events information? Visit the daily Events page.

Can’t attend the game? Watch the livestream:

  • Go to gobatesbobcats.com
  • Hover over the “Media” tab
  • Click the “Livestreams” link and look for your event. (Not all games are livestreamed.)

Questions or comments? Contact events editor Doug Hubley at calendar@bates.edu.


Recurring Events

Taking place while Bates is in session. Please confirm before you go.

4:15pm daily | Dharma Society sit: A 20-minute group meditation. Wednesday–Sunday, meditation is silent. Beginners are welcome and orientations provided. FMI abrownel@bates.edu.
Gomes Chapel

12:15pm Mon | Monday Meditation: Start your week well with a 20-minute meditation facilitated by the Multifaith Chaplaincy. Beginners welcome. FMI 207-786-8272.
Gomes Chapel

6:30pm Mon | Zen meditation led by Associated Buddhist Chaplain Jaime McLeod. Cushions provided, beginners welcome. FMI jaime@treetopzencenter.org.
Gomes Chapel

6pm Wed | Life drawing with the Museum of Art. Dry-media easels and drawing benches provided, bring drawing board and supplies. $10/$9 museum members; $90/$80 for pre-purchased 10-session tickets. FMI 207-786-8302.
Olin 259


Zach Bernstein ’20 of Syracuse, N.Y., speaks with a representative from the Boston University School of Public Health during the 2017 Graduate and Professional School Fair at Bates. (Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College)

2 Tue

11am | Graduate and Professional School Fair: Each fall, more than 80 graduate and professional schools come to campus. Students, faculty, staff and the public are invited to meet with admissions representatives to learn about the variety of programs offered, admission requirements and what distinguishes one program from another. Tip: Before the fair, visit the website to review the attending institutions, program descriptions, and questions you might have. FMI jsmith6@bates.edu.
Gray Athletic Building

4:15pm | Labor Income Share and the Relative Price of Investment in the U.S.: A talk by economics professor Edouard Wemy of Clark University. FMI dbegin@bates.edu.
Pettengill G21

6pm | Volleyball vs. University of New England.
Alumni Gym


3 Wed

9pm | {pause}: The Multifaith Chaplaincy offers a deeply reflective, secular half-hour of silence, poetry, music, dance and art. FMI 207-786-8272.
Gomes Chapel


4 Thu

4:15pm | Plato on Pleasure and Harmony in the Republic: Assistant professor of philosophy at Duquesne University, Kelly Arenson discusses Plato’s arguments about pleasure, psychic harmony and the three parts of the soul in Book 9 of the Republic. FMI 207-786-8295.
Hedge 208


5 Fri

3:30pm | Women’s tennis vs. Merrimack College.
Wallach Tennis Center

7:30pm | Olin Concert Series: Dahlov Ipcar’s Favorite Folk Songs & Ballads. Friends of the beloved Maine artist Dahlov Ipcar present a concert of her favorite folk music while projecting her illustrations of the songs. The performers: Bob Zentz and Jeanne McDougall Zentz, and the Portland band Roll & Go — Nor and Eli Dale, Charlie Ipcar and Jeff Logan. Tickets: $15, available at batesconcerts.eventbrite.com. Presented in conjunction with the Museum of Art exhibition Dahlov Ipcar: Blue Moons & Menageries (see below). Learn more about Ipcar. FMI 207-786-6135.
Olin Concert Hall


Reflected in a mirrored wall at the Marcy Plavin Dance Studio, Bates dancers rehearse “Passing” for last year’s Back to Bates Dance Concert. The piece celebrated the life and works of dance program founder Plavin. (Theophil Syslo/Bates College)

6 Sat

9am | Tennis: Wallach Men’s Tournament.
Wallach Tennis Center

11am | Women’s soccer vs. Connecticut College.
Russell Street Field

Noon | Back to Bates Dance Concert: An interlude of dance by students, faculty and guest artists celebrating the college’s Homecoming & Family Weekend. FMI 207-786-6161.
Schaeffer Theatre

Noon | Field hockey vs. Connecticut College.
Campus Avenue Field

1pm | Football vs. Williams.
Garcelon Field

2pm | Men’s soccer vs. Connecticut College.
Russell Street Field


7 Sun

9am | Tennis: Wallach Men’s Tournament.
Wallach Tennis Center

Noon | Back to Bates Dance Concert (see Oct. 6). FMI 207-786-6161.
Schaeffer Theatre


8 Mon

7pm | Inspiring Radical Creativity: An Evening with Gabby Rivera. Rivera is an outgoing, outspoken creator invested in fostering better dialogue and improving our most vulnerable communities. Author of the acclaimed coming-of-age novel Juliet Takes a Breath, she’s also the writer of the new Marvel series America — featuring the first-ever queer Latinx teen-girl superhero — which is catching headlines from The New York Times, CNN, Vogue and other top media. FMI 207-786-8303.
Chase Hall, Memorial Commons


Bates field hockey will take on UMaine-Farmington on Oct. 9. Here, Taylor Lough ’19 shoots during the Bobcats’ win over UMF in 2017. (Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College)

9 Tue

6pm | Field hockey vs. Maine–Farmington.
Campus Avenue Field


10 Wed

11:45am | Public Works in Progress: Bates students share their summertime experiences, sponsored by the Harward Center for Community Partnerships, working with diverse organizations in the nonprofit and governmental sectors. FMI 207-786-8273 or mdeschai@bates.edu.
Commons 221–222

3pm | American Red Cross blood drive: With blood donations always needed, Bates Emergency Medical Services hosts several American Red Cross blood drives every year. Students, faculty, staff and community members are encouraged to donate. FMI jsheltra@bates.edu.
Chase Hall, Memorial Commons

7pm | Theory Into Practice: Focus on Criminal Justice Reform. Panelists include Maine state Sen. Mark Dion and Maine State Prison Warden Randall Liberty. Sponsored by the Harward Center for Community Partnerships. FMI 207-786-6202.
Muskie Archives

7pm | Volleyball vs. Maine Maritime Academy.
Alumni Gym

9pm | {pause} (see Oct. 3).
Gomes Chapel


11 Thu

6pm | Field hockey vs. Southern Maine.
Campus Avenue Field


Guitarists Hideki Yamaya and John Schneiderman perform a Beethoven program on Oct. 12.

12 Fri

8am | Trans Studies in the Global South: This daylong event features the work of emerging scholars working in trans studies, a field including the study of gender normativities and nonconformities. The three sessions will include presentations and discussion. Presented by the Program in Gender and Sexuality Studies. FMI rherzig@bates.edu.
Commons 221–222

3pm | Women’s soccer vs. Colby.
Russell Street Field

7pm | Volleyball vs. Husson.
Alumni Gym

7:30pm | Eggs: For an independent study, Alison Greene ’20 directs Florence Keith-Roach’s dark two-character comedy about, as the playwright says, “female friendship, fertility and freaking out.” Free, but tickets required: bit.ly/bates-theater-dance. $5 donations gratefully accepted. FMI 207-786-6161.
Black Box Theater

7:30pm | Hideki Yamaya and John Schneiderman, guitarists: Yamaya and Schneiderman, who is Yamaya’s mentor and former professor, specialize in music from the 18th and 19th centuries on plucked stringed instruments, both familiar and less well-known. Drawing on their 2017 recording, their Bates program consists of music by Beethoven arranged for two guitars. Free but tickets required: batesconcerts.eventbrite.com. FMI 207-786-6135 or olinarts@bates.edu.
Olin Concert Hall


Brendan Costa ’21 sprints 70 yards for a touchdown against Tufts in September 2017. (Theophil Syslo/Bates College)

13 Sat

1pm | Football vs. Wesleyan.
Garcelon Field

5pm | Eggs (see Oct. 12).
Black Box Theater


14 Sun

2pm | Eggs (see Oct. 12).
Black Box Theater


18 Thu

3pm | Women’s soccer vs. Lesley College.
Russell Street Field

7pm | Field hockey vs. Endicott.
Campus Avenue Field


23 Tue

3pm | Women’s soccer vs. Colby.
Russell Street Field

7pm | Volleyball vs. Husson.
Alumni Gym


A scene from The Workshop, featured at the Tournées Film Festival.

24 Wed

3pm | Men’s soccer vs. Colby.
Russell Street Field

6pm | Field hockey vs. Colby.
Campus Avenue Field

7pm | Tournées Film Festival: The Workshop. The annual touring festival of francophone film returns to Bates. In writer-director Laurent Cantet’s film, a novelist teaches a writing workshop for a diverse group of young unemployed people. As the novelist attempts to understand why one of her students embraces a reprehensible ideology, the film builds into a breathtaking thriller that provides startling insight into conflicts of culture and belief pertinent far beyond France. An opening reception for the festival starts at 6:30pm, and a Q&A follows. FMI lballadu@bates.edu. (2017, 113 min.)
Olin 104

9pm | {pause} (see Oct. 3).
Gomes Chapel


Shown in a 2015 photo with Jason DeFelice ’17 and Julia Rice ’16, Nancy Koven (center) gives a talk on Oct. 25 in conjunction with her appointment as the inaugural John E. Kelsey Professor of Neuroscience. (Josh Kuckens/Bates College)

25 Thu

4:30pm | Stories of Neuroscience: A talk by Nancy Koven in conjunction with her appointment as the inaugural John E. Kelsey Professor of Neuroscience. Koven’s research in neuropsychiatry examines brain structure and function in the context of mental health, focusing on the interplay between cognition and emotion in behavior. Endowed by Michael Bonney ’80 and Alison Grott Bonney ’80, the Kelsey Professorship honors Professor Emeritus of Psychology Kelsey and his contributions to the Bates neuroscience program; and it recognizes a faculty member who exemplifies the supportive, innovative and hands-on approach to teaching neuroscience. FMI hfear@bates.edu.
Pettengill G52

7:30pm | Bill Roorbach, writer: Literary Arts Live presents a reading and conversation with the award-winning Maine author. Roorbach’s newest book is the story collection The Girl of the Lake; he also wrote The Remedy for Love, a Kirkus Prize finalist, and the best-selling Life Among Giants. Sponsored by the English department. FMI 207-753-6963.
Muskie Archives


26 Fri

7pm | Volleyball vs. Amherst.
Alumni Gym

7:30pm | Bates Digital Music Symposium: The first-ever Bates Digital Music Symposium presents emerging artists selected from applicants in more than 10 countries. Featured are works created with hand-made instruments, a live interactive video game for musicians and haptic interfaces — that is, systems enabling interactions with the computer via bodily sensations and motions. Sponsored by the Mellon Foundation as part of the New Scholars Series. A talk precedes the concert at 7pm. Free but tickets required: batesconcerts.eventbrite.com. FMI 207-786-6135 or olinarts@bates.edu.
Olin Concert Hall


Elizabeth Rush, author of When the Seas Rise, gives the annual Otis Lecture on Oct. 27. A photographer and a writer of creative nonfiction, Rush was a Mellon postdoctoral fellow at Bates in 2015–16. (Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College)

27 Sat

1pm | Football vs. Colby.
Garcelon Field

2pm | Tournées Film Festival: Polina. The first feature by leading French choreographer Angelin Preljocaj was written and directed in tandem with documentarian Valérie Müller. Depicting the coming of age of a young ballerina as she discovers contemporary dance, it stars Anastasia Shevtsova, a 19-year-old Russian dancer who learned French to play the title role. Q&A follows the movie. FMI lballadu@bates.edu. (2016, 108 min.)
Olin 104

2pm | Volleyball vs. Trinity.
Alumni Gym

7pm | On Rising: Exertion, Activism and Art in the Age of Climate Change. A talk by creative-nonfiction writer Elizabeth Rush, author of Rising: Dispatches From the New American Shore. Called “moving and urgent” by Pacific Standard, the book details communities’ responses to rising sea levels. The annual Otis Lecture is funded by the Philip J. Otis Endowment, which helps support Bates programs with an environmental focus. Free but tickets required, available at bit.ly/Otis1027. FMI hfear@bates.edu.
Olin Concert Hall

8:30 pm | Opening reception: This reception opens the fall-winter exhibitions at the Bates College Museum of Art: Anthropocenic: Art About the Natural World in the Human Era and Amy Stacey Curtis: Time and Place (see below). The reception follows the annual Otis Lecture, co-sponsored this year by the museum and related to Anthropocenic. FMI 207-786-6158, Museum of Art website or museum@bates.edu.
Museum of Art


31 Wed

11:45am | Public Works in Progress (see Oct. 10).
Commons 221–222

9pm | {pause} (see Oct. 3).
Gomes Chapel


“Hunters of the Moon,” a 1962 oil painting by Dahlov Ipcar.

Museum of Art

bates.edu/museum

museum@bates.edu

Ending Oct. 6

Dahlov Ipcar: Blue Moons & Menageries: This array of paintings, drawings, prints and sculptures represents nearly the entire career of Ipcar, one of Maine’s best-known artists. Many of the works shown are exhibited publicly for the first time.

Maine Moderns: Drawings by Marsden Hartley and Carl Sprinchorn: This exhibition brings together figural drawings by artists who were longtime friends. Lewiston native Hartley is recognized as an innovative and important figure in American Modernism. Sprinchorn was a Swedish-American artist who did much work in Maine. His drawings here include several that appeared in Sprinchorn’s first New York show, where he met Hartley.

Oct. 27–Dec. 21

Amy Stacey Curtis: Time and Place: Curtis is recognized for her ambitious and interactive sculpture installations, notably an 18-year project in which nine “solo-biennials” were composed of 81 installation and new-media works. This show, however, focuses on drawings by Curtis, which illustrate her fascination with themes of order, chaos and repetition. No less impressive than her large-scale installations, these graphic works provide a more intimate and personal approach to her continued examination of interconnectedness.

Oct. 27—March 23

Anthropocenic: Art About the Natural World in the Human Era: Scientists are thinking about how the Holocene, the geological period that began after the end of the last ice age around 12,000 years ago, has perhaps been replaced by the Anthropocene — an epoch named for humans and defined as one in which our impact on the world has been so acute that it is in the geologic evidence. Anthropocenic is a topical and compelling group exhibition by artists who — embracing widely varied conceptual strategies, artistic practices and media — make art about the natural world and our effects on and interrelation with it in the 21st century.

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