The Writing & Language Center

The Writing & Language Center (WLC) brings together Bates students and trained peer tutors for collaborative conversation at any stage of the writing or speaking process. The program provides a convenient, student-centered option for students seeking to develop their writing or oral communication skills.

During a typical academic year, our peer tutors conduct more than 3,000 one-to-one conferences on everything from PowerPoint presentations for first-year seminars, to papers in all academic disciplines at all course levels, to senior theses and posters for the Mount David Summit. As students themselves, our peer tutors communicate on students’ terms, bringing student-oriented perspectives, insights, and local knowledge to the conversation.

The Writing & Language Center is located in The Academic Resource Commons (ARC) on the first floor of Ladd Library. Appointments encouraged. Drop ins welcome! Check out our peer tutor schedules and availability by logging into WCOnline with your Bates credentials or by stopping by the front desk of ARC and talking to a Resource Representative. You can also chat with a Resource Rep during our hours of operation using our Chat widget on the website.

Please click here for more detailed information on the Writing & Language Center’s web page which lives on The Academic Resource Commons’ website.

Student Comments About Peer Tutors in the WLC

  • “The [peer tutor for writing] helped me to think about my paper more as a whole rather than just sentence by sentence. I now find myself doing much more rearranging with paragraphs and sentences to make my papers flow more logically.”
  • “I would often go in worried, and leave relieved.”
  • “My FYS [Course-Attached Tutor, or CAT] tries her hardest to help me grow as a writer.  She is the best!”
  • “The [peer tutor for writing] was very effective at asking the right questions to help me re-think the content of my talk at micro and macro levels. She was very approachable, respectful, and supportive – she even came to the talk.”
  • “He made me question what I was actually saying in my paper. As a writer I tend to overdo it at times. He helped me get straight to the point.”