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IMMERSIVE MATHEMATICS IN RENDERED ENVIRONMENTS

A talk/presentation by Justin Dimmel and Camden Bock (Bates ’16)
Thursday, January 18
Carnegie 113
7:00 pm.

“We report on the design and development of HandWaver, a gesture-based mathematical making environment for use with room-scale virtual reality.  A beta version of HandWaver was developed at the IMRE Lab at the University of Maine and released in the spring of 2017. Our goal in developing HandWaver was to harness the modes of representation and interaction available in virtual environments and use them to create experiences where learners could use their hands to construct geometric figures using a series of gesture-based operators, such as stretching figures to bring them up into higher dimensions, or revolving figures around axes. We will describe plans for research and future development.”

Justin Dimmel is assistant professor of mathematics education and instructional technology at the University of Maine. He earned his MS in mathematics and Ph. D. in mathematics education at the University of Michigan. Prior to earning his Ph. D., Justin worked for 5 years as a high school mathematics teacher at adventure-based boarding schools in New England and the Bahamas. He investigates how people learn to represent mathematics and communicate their mathematical ideas to others.

Camden Bock ’16, is a research assistant in the College of Education and Human Development and the Maine Center for Research in STEM Education at The University of Maine, pursuing a MST and PhD in STEM Education with concentration in mathematics education. Camden works in the IMRE Lab, under the supervision of Professor Justin Dimmel, to develop HandWaver, a room-scale gesture-based virtual environment for geometric manipulation. Prior to joining the IMRE Lab, Camden completed a B.S. in mathematics and certification.

 

 


A dynamic subject, with connections to many disciplines, mathematics is an integral part of a liberal arts education. It is increasingly vital in understanding science, technology, and society.

2017 Seniors

Photography by Chip Ross, Associate Professor of Mathematics at Bates