Recently Awarded Grants

Congratulations to the following Bates College investigators who have recently been awarded grants!

Bates Fulbright Scholars

Congratulations to this year’s Fulbright Student Awardees and to Áslaug Ásgeirsdóttir, Professor of Politics and Associate Dean of the Faculty, Amy Douglass, Professor of Psychology, and Anita Charles, Senior Lecturer in Education and Director of Secondary Teacher Education, who have been awarded Fulbright Scholarships!

Bev Johnson

Professor of Earth and Climates Sciences

Dr. Johnson has been awarded a grant from the University of Maine through their Maine Sea Grant program, funded by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Dr. Johnson will work with partners at Maine Coastal Program, Maine Natural Areas Program, and Biological Conservation to measure methane emissions, carbon and sequestration, vegetation, hydrology and sedimentation in tidally restricted salt marshes in an effort to better quantify the benefits of salt marsh conservation and restoration.

Dr. Johnson’s research efforts are further supported by the Maine Coast Heritage Trust, which has generously funded a student intern to work with Dr. Johnson during the Summer of 2022.

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration logo

Award No. UMS1363, $140,215. This research is supported by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). These data and related items of information have not been formally disseminated by NOAA, and do not represent any agency determination, view, or policy.

Maine Coast Heritage Trust logo

MCHT Summer 2022 Internship, $6,000.

Lori Banks

Assistant Professor of Biology

Dr. Banks has been awarded a competitive renewal grant from the Maine INBRE program through the Mount Desert Island Biological Laboratory (MDIBL) with funding from the National Institutes of Health for her project “Understanding the Mechanistic Outcomes of Human Rotavirus NSP4 Sequence Variation”. Rotavirus afflicts millions of children and results in the death of 300-500 thousand each year. As part of this project, the Banks lab will explore the relationship between sequence and function of a key protein in rotavirus infection, NSP4, with the eventual goal of targeting NSP4 for development of antiviral therapeutics .

National Institutes of Health logo

Award No. P20GM103423-22/BATES, $125,010. Research reported in this publication was supported by the National Institute Of General Medical Sciences of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number P20GM103423. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.

Colleen O’Loughlin

Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry

Dr. O’Loughlin has been awarded a competitive renewal grant from the Maine INBRE program through the Mount Desert Island Biological Laboratory (MDIBL) with funding from the National Institutes of Health. Dr. O’Loughlin’s research focuses on understanding factors that influence bacteria that commonly live on human skin, including understanding how specific compounds can alter the bacteria from mutualistic to pathogenic interactions. Her research may contribute to better understanding and preventing post-operative infections.

Headshot of Colleen O'Loughlin
National Institutes of Health logo

Award No. P20GM103423-22/BATES, $125,010. Research reported in this publication was supported by the National Institute Of General Medical Sciences of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number P20GM103423. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.

Ryan Bavis

Helen A. Papaioanou Professor of Biological Sciences

Dr. Bavis serves as Primary Investigator for an award from the Maine INBRE program through the Mount Desert Island Biological Laboratory (MDIBL). The INBRE (IDeA Networks of Biomedical Research Excellence) program through the National Institutes of Health supports a multidisciplinary research network with a broad biomedical or behavioral thematic focus with a goal of strengthening research expertise and infrastructure and spurring interaction with other IDeA programs. The Bates INBRE award supports student summer research fellowships and internships, a speaker series, and a 2 week short course for Bates students at the MDIBL lab.

National Institutes of Health logo

Award No. P20GM103423-22/BATES, $193,617. Research reported in this publication was supported by the National Institute Of General Medical Sciences of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number P20GM103423. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.

Marcelle Medford

Assistant Professor of Sociology

Congratulations to Dr. Medford, who was awarded a 2022 Career Enhancement Fellowship from the Institute for Citizens and Scholars!

Shoshona Currier

Director, Bates Dance Festival

Shoni Currier has been awarded several grants this year to support the Bates Dance Festival, including one National Endowment for the Arts award. The BDF was one of approximately 550 organizations out of ~1,800 applicants to receive an American Rescue Plan award in the third round of NEA funding. This $150,000 award will help the festival recover from the disruptions caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.

A second grant from the NEA and an Association of Performing Arts Professionals ArtsForward grant, made possible through support from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, will support the presentation of contemporary dance and community engagement by Reggie Wilson/Fist and Hell Performance Group and Ananya Dance Theater as part of the 2022 Bates Dance Festival.

Bates Dance Festival dancers wearing gold sequin outfits performing outdoors under a tree
Bates Dance festival dancer performing choreography next to a tree trunk

A one year grant from the New England Foundation for the Arts (NEFA) through the New England Arts Resilience Fund, part of the United States Regional Arts Resilience Fund, an initiative of the U.S. Regional Arts Organizations and The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, with major funding from the federal CARES Act and the American Rescue Plan Act from the National Endowment for the Arts will support Bates Dance Festival staff positions that were reduced in 2020 and 2021 due to the pandemic and increased fees for existing staff positions as BDF builds towards a full capacity festival in Summer, 2022. Four additional awards from NEFA NEST program will help bring artists Barbie Diewald, Aretha Aoki, Vanessa Anspaugh, and Rennie Harris to the BDF.

Planning of this year’s festival is further supported by an award that is funded in part by two grants from the Maine Arts Commission, an independent state agency supported by the National Endowment for the Arts.

Additional funding has been provided by The Maine Humanities Council and the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) as part of the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021. This 18 month award has the goal of supporting provision of humanities programming to the public will support the next phase of a project called The Future Impossible. The Future Impossible was founded as a response to Black Lives Matter and is a call for all educational institutions to raise awareness around racial disparity and to make significant reforms to hiring and teaching practices that reflect the urgent need to contend with racial inequity. Funding from MCH will support the addition of new essays and discussions to the project, as well as an in-person platform during the 2022 BDF Festival.

Read more about the NEA awards and the APAP ArtsForward award…

National Endowment for the Arts logo

National Endowment for the Arts Award No. 1889479-33, $40,000; Award No. 1896006-66, $150,000.

New England Foundation for the Arts logo

New England Foundation for the Arts Award No. 21-39671, $10,000; Award No. 22-40648, $4,500; Award No. 22-40647, $4,500; Award No. 22-40649, $4,500; and Award No. 22-40651, $10,000.

Maine Humanities Council logo

Maine Humanities Council Award No. SHARP-PROJ-11, $7,500.

Maine Arts Commission logo

Maine Arts Commission Award No. CT#20211223000000000055, $15,000.

Association of Performing Arts Professionals ArtsForward logo

Association of Performing Arts Professionals, $50,000.

Krista Aronson

Professor of Psychology, Assoc. Dean of the Faculty

The “Identity and Multilingualism through Picture Books: Summer Institute for K-3 at Bates College” has been made possible in part by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Democracy demands wisdom. This one year grant will support a two-week summer institute, to be held at Bates during Summer, 2022, for 29 elementary school teachers and will focus on pedagogical approaches to language learning through an equity lens.

Diverse BookFinder logo
National Endowment for the Humanities logo

National Endowment for the Humanities, Award No. ES-281204-21, $173,664

Matt Côté

Associate Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry

Dr. Côté and collaborators at the University of Maine have been awarded a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy in support of their project “Next Generation Harsh-Environment Materials and Wireless Sensor Techniques for Energy Sector Applications“. Over the next two years, Dr. Côté and Bates undergraduate researchers will use nonlinear optical harmonic generation microscopy and spectroscopy to study the strain induced in silicon carbide electronics when exposed to harsh environmental conditions. The project will use a multifunction optical microscope/spectrometer, constructed and housed in Prof. Côté’s laboratory, to generate spatial maps of changes in the devices’ material properties on a length scale from ~300 nm to tens of microns.

Headshot of Matt Côté
US Department of Energy logo

The work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Award No. DE-SC002 (UMS1332), $30,000 (Bates College portion only).

Aleks Diamond-Stanic

Assistant Professor of Physics & Astronomy

Dr. Diamond-Stanic has received funding from the National Science Foundation to support his project “Absorption and Emission Line Probes of Galactic Winds with eBOSS”. This is an 3 year long collaborative RUI proposal between Bates and researchers at the University of Wisconsin. As part of this project, Dr. Diamond-Stanic will bridge a gap between our theoretical understanding and observations of factors that limit the size of galaxies as they are forming. The team will use observations of 300,000 galaxies from the extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS) measure galaxy outflow and physical properties. In addition, the PIs will use web-based computational astronomy activities to design a new curricular module for high school and undergraduate labs centered on the engineering, data, and science of the eBOSS survey and will distribute this new module through a series of workshops.

National Science Foundation logo

This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 2107726, $276,575. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

Michelle Greene

Assistant Professor of Neuroscience

The National Science Foundation has provided 4 years of funding to support Dr. Greene’s project “RII Track-2 FEC: The Visual Experience Database: A large-scale point-of-view video database“. Dr. Greene and collaborators at the University of Nevada, Reno and North Dakota State University, who are currently in year 3 of this project, are working to create a database of video captured from head-mounted cameras combined with recordings of the videographer’s eye movements. The data is recorded by a diverse set of observers engaged in common, everyday activities such as shopping, eating, or walking. Through this design Dr. Greene hopes to bypass many of the biases of existing databases by representing common, human experiences. The data will be used to further our understanding of human visual experience and could be used to increases the efficacy of computer vision algorithms. Read more...

National Science Foundation logo

This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1920896. $3,974,001. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation

Holly Ewing

Professor of Environmental Studies

Dr. Ewing has been awarded funding from the National Science Foundation for a four year project “EPSCoR Track 2: Computational Methods and Autonomous Robotics Systems for Modeling and Predicting Harmful Cyanobacterial Blooms” that seeks to improve our ability to predict harmful cyanobacteria blooms in freshwater bodies. Working with collaborators at Dartmouth College, Dr. Ewing and her students will use autonomous vehicles to collect data from local freshwater bodies and then use machine learning techniques to improve bloom prediction capabilities.

National Science Foundation logo

This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1923004 (Dartmouth College subaward no. R2199). Award amount $841,776. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

Louise Brogan

Assistant in Instruction in Biology

Dr. Brogan has received funding from the University of Maine National Science Foundation EPSCoR program in support of her project “Molecules to Ecosystem Course ReDesign 2021“. Molecules to Ecosystems (BIO204) is a course-based research experience that utilizes original research using environmental DNA. This funding will support Dr. Brogan’s efforts over the next two years to develop additional modules for BIO204 to include the research interests of additional faculty and ensure novel research questions are addressed.

National Science Foundation logo

This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. OIA-1849227 (University of Maine, Maine Center for Research in STEM Education (RiSE Center) EPSCoR subaward no. 5100603001). Award amount $10,000. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

Jeff Oishi

Associate Professor of Physics & Astronomy

Dr. Oishi and collaborators at Northwestern University have received funding to support their project “Magneto-Rotational Instability in the Sun? Global Radiation-MHD Simulations of the Near-Surface Shear Layer” from National Aeronautics & Space Administration (NASA). Currently in the second of three years, this study aims to study the origins of the sun’s magnetic activity.  origins of the Sun’s magnetic activity and considers the novel approach that the seat of global solar magnetic activity resides mostly within Near-Surface-Shear Layer.

National Aeronautics and Space Administration logo

The work is supported by the U.S. National Aeronautics & Space Administration, Office of Science, under Award No. 80NSSC20K1280 (Northwestern University subaward no. 60057449 BC), $80,892 (Bates College portion only).

Geneva Laurita

Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry

Dr. Laurita has received funding from the National Science Foundation for her project “RUI: Developing Insight and Control of Polarity in the Pyrochlore Lattice” to study the polarity in pyrochlore oxides with the longer-term aim of identifying a means of generating polar crystal structures, a class of materials commonly used in electronic devises, with the use of lead (Pb). This three year project provides significant research opportunities to Bates undergraduates, including onsite reach at National Laboratories and travel to national conferences.

National Science Foundation logo

This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1904980. $170,278. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

Carrie Diaz Eaton

Associate Professor of Digital and Computational Studies

Dr. Diaz Eaton has received funding from the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation to support the initial development of and strategic planning for the Institute for a Racially Just, Inclusive and Open STEM Education (RIOS) over 16 months. RIOS reimagines STEM education grounded in the principles of open education, open science, racial justice, equity and inclusivity.  With support from the Hewlett Foundation, RIOS offers leadership development, collaborative programs, strategic communications, and relationship building to develop a strategic plan for the RIOS Institute. 

Associate Professor Carrie Diaz Eaton teaches in front of a chalkboard
William and Flora Hewlett Foundation logo

Award No. 2021-2923, $605,852

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