Courses

trio in lab

Courses
CHEM 107A. Atomic and Molecular Structure/Lab.
Fundamental concepts underlying the structure and behavior of matter are developed. Major topics include states of matter, atomic structure, periodicity, and bonding. This course, or its equivalent, is a prerequisite for all advanced courses in chemistry and biological chemistry. Laboratory: three hours per week. Enrollment limited to 39 per section. Normally offered every year. [L] [Q] [QF] [S] [SR] M. Côté, G. Laurita, C. O'Loughlin, Staff.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

CHEM 108A. Chemical Reactivity/Lab.
A continuation of CHEM 107A. Major topics include thermodynamics, kinetics, equilibrium, acid/base behavior, and electrochemistry. Laboratory: three hours per week. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 107A. Enrollment limited to 39 per section. Normally offered every year. [L] [Q] [QF] [S] [SR] M. Côté, G. Laurita, T. Lawson.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

CHEM 111. Science and Human Welfare: A Historical Perspective.
The interests of individuals, economic entities, and political sectors drive scientific exploration, and the resulting discoveries may or may not be equitably applied to improve the welfare of human populations as a whole. This course uses a case-study approach to examine the chemical principles behind examples of some of most significant applications of scientific problem solving that have occurred within the past 300 years. Each application is analyzed in terms of the forces that guided the discovery and the impact the discovery has had on the welfare of the affected social groups. Enrollment limited to 24. [S] T. Lawson.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

CHEM 125. Bioenergetics and Nutrition.
Living organisms require nutrients extracted from the environment to support the chemical reactions necessary for all life processes including development, growth, motion, and reproduction. Maintaining the chemical reactions that allow the web of life to continue to exist on Earth demands a continuous input of energy. This course examines the flow of energy from the sun into the biosphere through plants and into animals, with a focus on humans. Through a combination of research and oral presentations, problem solving, and group discussions, the chemistry behind this energy flow is explored, as are the ways in which energy is used by living organisms. The nutritional requirements required to support these energy transformations also are considered. Recommended background: high school chemistry. Not open to students who have received credit for CH/ES 108B or CHEM 108A. Enrollment limited to 29. [Q] [QF] [S] [SR] T. Lawson.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

CHEM 212. Separation Science/Lab.
A study of some of the most universally used methods and techniques of chemical separation. Both theory and applications are covered. Topics include chemical equilibrium, liquid-liquid extraction, gas and liquid chromatography, and electrophoresis. Laboratory: three hours per week. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 108A. Enrollment limited to 19. Normally offered every year. [L] [Q] [S] M. Sommer.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

CHEM 215. Inorganic Chemistry/Lab.
A study of the wide-ranging aspects of inorganic chemistry. The use of periodic trends and fundamental principles of inorganic chemistry to systematize the descriptive chemistry of the elements is explored. Topics include reaction mechanisms in inorganic chemistry, ligand field theory, and solid state chemistry. Applications of inorganic chemistry to biochemistry, environmental chemistry, and geochemistry are also considered. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 108A. Enrollment limited to 29. Normally offered every year. [QF] [S] [SR] G. Laurita.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

CHEM 217. Organic Chemistry I/Lab.
An introduction to organic chemistry. Topics include bonding, structure, stereochemistry, and nomenclature; reactions of alkyl halides; and spectroscopic methods. Laboratory: three hours per week. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 108A. Enrollment limited to 49. Normally offered every year. [L] [S] [SR] A. Kennedy, J. Koviach-Côté.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

CHEM 218. Organic Chemistry II/Lab.
A continuation of CHEM 217. The reactions of alcohols, alkenes, alkynes, carbonyl compounds, aromatics, and radicals are studied from both a mechanistic and a synthetic point of view. Laboratory: three hours per week. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 217. Enrollment limited to 49. Normally offered every year. [L] [S] [SR] A. Kennedy, J. Koviach-Côté.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

CHEM 301. Quantum Chemistry.
Major topics include quantum mechanics, atomic and molecular structure, and spectroscopy. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 108A, MATH 106, and PHYS 107 or 109. Corequisite(s): MATH 205. Enrollment limited to 20. Normally offered every year. [Q] [QF] [S] [SR] M. Côté.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

CHEM 302. Statistical Thermodynamics.
Major topics include statistical mechanics and chemical thermodynamics. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 108A, MATH 106. Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): PHYS 107 or 109. Enrollment limited to 32. Normally offered every year. [Q] [QF] [S] [SR] M. Côté.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

CHEM 303. Modern Data Acquisition and Analysis.
Making measurements is a key element of chemistry and other physical sciences. Measurements made with commercial turn-key instruments typically employ operations whose details are obscured by slick user interfaces. To help students make fuller and more sophisticated use of such instruments, this course provides a hands-on introduction to the details of the hidden operations: simple analog electronics, digital data acquisition, and computer-based data analysis. Students create simple electronic circuits, use the LabVIEW programming language to program computers to generate and acquire electronic signals, and apply Matlab software to analyze and extract meaning from the measurements they make. Relatively simple experiments and devices relevant to the physical sciences provide opportunities to put the ideas and techniques discussed into practice. The course includes discussions of the necessary background and theory, but strongly emphasizes hands-on experience. Neither experience with computer programming (in LabVIEW, Matlab, or otherwise), nor knowledge of electronics, is assumed. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 108, PHYS 108, or PHYS 109. Recommended background: MATH 106. Enrollment limited to 19. One-time offering. M. Côté.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

BI/CH 304. Biochemistry of Virus Replication and Host Cell Defense Systems.
Viruses that infect eukaryotic cells have evolved a wide range of strategies to co-opt the biochemical machinery of host cells for the purpose of maximizing virus replication success. Eukaryotic cells have simultaneously evolved mechanisms to limit the extent to which viruses can establish successful infections. This course examines, in large part through the primary literature, the replication biochemistry used by representative examples of mammalian viruses and the cellular biochemical pathways designed to defend cells and organisms from viral takeover. Students are expected to apply what they learn by preparing a grant application narrative as a final project. Prerequisite(s): BIO 242, or BIO 195 and 202, and CHEM 218. Enrollment limited to 15. [S] T. Lawson.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

CHEM 308. Topics in Physical Chemistry.
This course explores topics in physical chemistry beyond those encountered in Quantum Chemistry. Topics are drawn from the following: theoretical aspects of spectroscopy, molecular structure and dynamics, and condensed matter. Computation for modeling and visualization is emphasized. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 301, MATH 205, or PHYS 308. Enrollment limited to 19. [Q] [QF] [S] [SR] M. Côté, M. Sommer.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

CHEM 310. Biophysical Chemistry.
An overview of physical chemical principles and techniques used in understanding the properties, interactions, and functions of biological molecules. Thermodynamic, kinetic, and statistical mechanical principles are applied to understanding macromolecular assembly processes (i.e., assembly of viruses or ribosomes) and macromolecular interactions involved in gene expression and regulation, DNA replication, and other biological processes. Techniques used in studying protein folding, RNA folding, and enzyme kinetics are presented. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 108A, PHYS 107, and MATH 106. This course is normally offered every year, alternating with CHEM 302. Enrollment limited to 32. [Q] [QF] [S] [SR] P. Schlax.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

CHEM 313. Spectroscopic Determination of Molecular Structure.
In this course the utilization of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectral data for structural analysis is developed. Particular attention is given to the interpretation of proton, carbon-13, and two-dimensional NMR spectra, and to the interpretation of fragmentation patterns in electron-impact mass spectrometry. Theoretical and instrumental aspects of modern NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry are covered. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 218. Enrollment limited to 19. [S] [SR] J. Koviach-Côté.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

CHEM 316. Advanced Topics in Inorganic Chemistry.
A study of selected advanced topics in inorganic chemistry. Topics may include bioinorganic chemistry, inorganic materials science, and inorganic reaction mechanisms. Critical reading of the current literature, and applications of inorganic research, are emphasized. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 215. Enrollment limited to 19. [S] G. Laurita. Enrollment limited to 19. [QF] [S] [SR] G. Laurita.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

CH/NS 320. Mechanisms of Memory.
This course engages students in ideas from the fields of neuroscience, chemistry, biology, and psychology to understand on a chemical level how memory is stored and recalled in the human brain. Using seminal experiments as a foundation, students differentiate between “learning” and “memory” and connect model systems from the molecule all the way to behavior. Multimodal assignments explore the broad scope of experimental design and the cutting-edge subtleties of what it means to store and access information in the brain. Prerequisite(s):( BIO 202 and 204) or Bio 242 and CHEM 217. Enrollment limited to 39. [CP] [HS] [S] A. Kennedy.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

CHEM 321. Biological Chemistry I/Lab.
An introduction to biologically important molecules and macromolecular assemblies. Topics discussed include the structure and chemistry of proteins; the mechanisms and kinetics of enzyme-catalyzed reactions; and the structure, chemistry, and functions of carbohydrates, lipids, nucleic acids, and biological membranes. Laboratory: three hours per week. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 218. Recommended background: Bio 242, or BIO 202 and 204, and CHEM 217. Enrollment limited to 26. Normally offered every year. [L] [Q] [QF] [S] [SR] T. Lawson, C. O'Loughlin, P. Schlax.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

CHEM 322. Biological Chemistry II/Lab.
A survey of the major metabolic processes in living cells. Topics discussed include protein synthesis, DNA replication and gene expression, the global organization of metabolic pathways, carbohydrate and fatty acid metabolism, biological oxidation, reduction and energy production, and the metabolism of nitrogen-containing compounds. Special attention is given to the mechanisms by which metabolic processes are regulated. Laboratory: three hours per week. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 321. Enrollment limited to 36. Normally offered every year. [L] [Q] [QF] [S] [SR] T. Lawson, C. O'Loughlin.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

CHEM 323. Analytical Spectroscopy and Electrochemistry.
Spectroscopic and electrochemical methods employed in chemical analysis are discussed. Topics include ultraviolet, visible, infrared, and atomic spectroscopy; and potentiometric and voltametric methods of analysis. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 217. Not open to students who have received credit for CHEM 223. Enrollment limited to 29. [S] Staff.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

CHEM 325. Advanced Organic Chemistry.
A study of important organic reactions with emphasis on structure, stereochemistry, mechanism, and synthesis. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 218. Enrollment limited to 19. [S] [SR] A. Kennedy, J. Koviach-Côté.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

CHEM 337. Natural Products and Secondary Metabolites as Drugs.
Over a third of all FDA-approved drugs originated as natural products originally made by mammals, plants, and microbes. As sequencing technologies have improved our ability to peer into genomes, there is a renewed hope that this genomic revolution will drive an expansion of drug-like natural products. In this course, students explore the biochemical pathways for the production of secondary metabolites, relate their synthesis to primary metabolism, and explore the clinical trial process. They discuss natural product biochemistry, assay development, clinical trial planning, patient recruitment, and how natural products have shaped human history. Recommended background: BIO 242, BIO 202 and 204, or CHEM 321. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 218. Enrollment limited to 19. [SR] C. O'Loughlin.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

CHEM 360. Independent Study.
Students, in consultation with a faculty advisor, individually design and plan a course of study or research not offered in the curriculum. Course work includes a reflective component, evaluation, and completion of an agreed-upon product. Sponsorship by a faculty member in the program/department, a course prospectus, and permission of the chair are required. Students may register for no more than one independent study per semester. Normally offered every semester. Staff.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

BIOC 457. Senior Thesis.
A laboratory or library research study in an area of interest under the supervision of a member of the biology or chemistry department. Senior majors deliver presentations on their research. Students register for BIOC 457 in the fall semester and BIOC 458 in the winter semester. Majors writing an honors thesis register for both BIOC 457 and 458. [W3] Normally offered every year. Staff.
Interdisciplinary Programs

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

CHEM 457. Senior Research and Seminar.
A laboratory or library research study in an area of interest under the supervision of a member of the department. Each senior major delivers one presentation on the research for each thesis credit. Students register for CHEM 457 in the fall semester. Majors writing an honors thesis register for both CHEM 457 and 458. [W3] Normally offered every year. Staff.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

BIOC 458. Senior Thesis.
A laboratory or library research study in an area of interest under the supervision of a member of the biology or chemistry department. Senior majors will be asked to deliver presentations on their research. Students register for BIOC 457 in the fall semester and BIOC 458 in the winter semester. Majors writing an honors thesis register for both BIOC 457 and 458. [W3] Normally offered every year. Staff.
Interdisciplinary Programs

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

CHEM 458. Senior Research and Seminar.
A laboratory or library research study in an area of interest under the supervision of a member of the department. Each senior major delivers one presentation on the research for each thesis credit. Students register for CHEM 458 in the winter semester. Majors writing an honors thesis register for both CHEM457 and 458. [W3] Normally offered every year. Staff.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

Short Term Courses
BI/CH s24. Introduction to Scanning Microscopies.
Many of the recent advances in microscopy have been based on scanning a probe, which can be a light beam, electron beam, or mechanical tip, across a sample. This course provides hands-on experience with, and a discussion of the theory underlying, scanning microscopies. Students learn to use a scanning electron microscope and a confocal microscope and complete an individual project. Prerequisite(s): one of the following: CHEM 107A, 108A; PHYS 107, 108. Enrollment limited to 14. [SR] M. Côté.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

CHEM s37. Advanced Chemical Measurement Laboratory/Lab.
The use of spectroscopic methods to probe atomic and molecular structure, and to identify, characterize, and quantify chemical species is examined. Measurements of thermodynamic and kinetic parameters describing chemical reactions are performed. Theoretical and experimental aspects of several techniques including nuclear magnetic resonance, infrared spectroscopy, and UV-visible spectroscopy are covered. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 301, 302, or 310. Enrollment limited to 29. [L] [Q] [QF] [S] [SR] P. Schlax, M. Côté.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

CHEM s42. Chemical Synthesis and Reactivity/Lab.
Multi-step synthesis, reactivity, and characterization of complex inorganic and organic molecules. Working independently, students carry out week-long experiments designed to introduce important techniques in modern organic and inorganic chemistry. Concepts covered include stereoselective reactions, air sensitive syntheses, and purification techniques. In addition, students gain hands-on experience with a wide variety of instrumentation used for compound characterization. Emphasis is placed on proper techniques in laboratory work, safety, waste handling, and communicating experimental approaches and results. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 218. Enrollment limited to 15. [CP] [L] [S] [SR] Staff.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

CHEM s50. Independent Study.
Students, in consultation with a faculty advisor, individually design and plan a course of study or research not offered in the curriculum. Course work includes a reflective component, evaluation, and completion of an agreed-upon product. Sponsorship by a faculty member in the program/department, a course prospectus, and permission of the chair are required. Students may register for no more than one independent study during a Short Term. Normally offered every year. Staff.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations