Psychology

Professors Kahan (chair), Kelsey, Low, Nigro, and Reich; Associate Professors Aronson, Boucher, Douglass, Koven, and Sargent; Assistant Professor Castro; Lecturers Fraser-Thill, Langdon, and Mathis



Students who major in psychology examine behavior and mental processes using the scientific method and learn to apply this knowledge in real-world and laboratory settings. Students are exposed to a large variety of topics and methods within the field of psychology (breadth) and are required to take additional courses in one of several focus areas (depth). Senior majors must complete an empirical, research thesis, a community-based research thesis, or a theoretical review and integration. For an empirical thesis, a student conducts original research on an issue of theoretical or practical concern. For a community-based research thesis, a student works in the community, using his or her training in psychology to address social or psychological issues in an applied setting. For a theoretical review and integration, a student conducts a comprehensive and critical review of the extant literature. More information on the psychology department is available on the website (www.bates.edu/PSYC.xml).

Major Requirements

The major consists of eleven courses, including the thesis. All majors are required to complete successfully:

1) PSYC 101 (Principles of Psychology), although this requirement may be waived for students who achieve a four or five on the Advanced Placement examination in psychology or who pass a departmental examination.

2) One course with content related to biological aspects of behavior and mental processes. Courses with content related to biology, identified with designation (Biological), may also count toward the content area course requirements described below.

3) One course with content related to diversity, broadly defined. Courses with content related to diversity or multiculturalism, identified with designation (Diversity), may also count toward the content area course requirements described below.

4) PSYC 218 (Statistics).

5) Either PSYC 261 (Research Methods) or ED/PY 262 (Community-Based Research Methods) must be completed before the end of the junior year.

6) Courses in specific content areas. Students must take at least seven content-area courses. Of these seven courses, at least one must be in each of the four contents areas (listed below) and at least three must be taken in a student's chosen area of focus. In addition, of these seven content-area courses, at least four must be at the 300-level, two of which must be in the focus area and one of which must be outside the focus area. (The fourth 300-level course may be either in the focus area or outside of it.) Only one Short Term course may be counted toward the major. Short Term courses numbered s10-s29 maybe counted at the 200 level; Short Term courses numbered s30-s49 may be counted at the 300 level.
The content areas are as follows. Courses marked with an asterisk are offered irregularly.

Cognition and Emotion.

PSYC 230. Cognitive Psychology.
PSYC 250. Motivation and Emotion.
PSYC 302. Sensation and Perception.
PSYC 305. Animal Learning. *
NS/PY 330. Cognitive Neuroscience.
PSYC 361. Topics in Affective Neuroscience.
PSYC 374. Psychology of Language. *
PSYC 380. Social Cognition.
PSYC s19. Animal Cognition: Exploring the Minds of Birds, Bees, Chimps, and Dolphins. *
PSYC s29. The Psychology of Humor. *
PSYC s38. Political Psychology. *

Biological and Health.

NS/PY 200. Introduction to Neuroscience.
PSYC 215. Brain Matters.
PSYC 235. Abnormal Psychology.
PSYC 303. Health Psychology.
PSYC 333. Advanced Topics in Abnormal Psychology.
PSYC 362. Psychopharmacology: How Drugs Affect Behavior.
NS/PY 363. Physiological Psychology.
PSYC 375. Psychology of Sport and Exercise.
PSYC 399. Junior-Senior Seminar in Biological Psychology. *
INDS s15. Health, Culture, and Community.
PSYC s41. Seminar in Biological Psychology/Neuroscience. *
PSYC s42. Practicum in Clinical Neuropsychology. *

Developmental and Personality.

PSYC 211. Psychology of Personality.
PSYC 240. Developmental Psychology.
PSYC 320. Adolescence.
PSYC 322. Child Psychopathology.
PSYC 340. Infancy. *
PSYC 341. Advanced Topics in Developmental Psychology. *
PSYC 372. Racial and Ethnic Identity Development.
PSYC 381. The Self.
PSYC s30. Contemporary Psychotherapies with Practicum. *
PSYC s36. Diversity in Adolescence. *

Cultural and Social.

PY/SO 210. Social Psychology.
AS/PY 260. Cultural Psychology.
PSYC 307. Applied Social Psychology. *
PY/SO 310. Advanced Topics in Social Psychology.
PSYC 311. Psychology of Religion. *
PSYC 317. Psychology and Law.
PY/WS 343. Women, Culture, and Health.
PSYC 370. Psychology of Women and Gender. *
PY/SO 371. Prejudice and Stereotyping.
PY/SO s18. Unequal Childhoods. *
PSYC s35. Psychology and the Media. *

7) A senior thesis that takes one of three forms: empirical research, community-based research, or theoretical review and integration. The thesis satisfies the [W3] requirement.

It is recommended that students take no more than thirteen courses in the major, including the thesis.

Study Abroad and Summer Study

Psychology majors may transfer up to three credits from summer or study-abroad programs toward the major, provided the courses are preapproved by the faculty liaison for off-campus study (typically the chair). Students should submit to the liaison a course description and syllabus for each transfer course. With the liaison's approval, one of the three courses may be a statistics or methodology course that may be used in lieu of Statistics (PSYC 218), Research Methods (PSYC 261), or Community-Based Research Methods (ED/PY 262), but students are strongly encouraged to take their statistics and methodology courses at Bates. Under no circumstances is any student permitted to apply more than one course taken elsewhere to a single content area. The biological core course and diversity-related course may not be taken elsewhere.

Students considering off-campus study should keep in mind several considerations. As previously noted, either PSYC 261 or ED/PY 262 must be completed before the end of the junior year, and PSYC 218 is a prerequisite for either course. Moreover, the department not only encourages students to take their statistics and methods courses at Bates, but also cautions students that it is extremely rare to find a non-Bates statistics or methods course that is sufficiently comparable to qualify for major credit. This set of considerations has significant implications for students who do not complete Statistics by the end of their sophomore year. All students considering a major in psychology should be aware that if they are unable to complete Statisitcs by the end of the sophomore year—even if that inability is a product of being randomized out during preregistration—then they will likely have to stay at Bates both semesters of the junior year in order to keep psychology viable as a major option.

Thesis

A thesis may be completed during the fall and/or winter semester of the senior year. Topics for theses must be approved by the department. For fall semester and two-semester theses: 1) students register for PSYC 457A (for empirical research), PSYC 457B (for community-based research); or PSYC 457C (for theoretical review and integration); 2) proposals must be submitted by 4:00 p.m. on Thursday of the second full week of classes in the fall semester. For winter semester theses: 1) students register for PSYC 458A (for empirical research), PSYC 458B (for community-based research); or PSYC 458C (for theoretical review and integration; 2) proposals must be submitted by 4:00 p.m. on the second Thursday in November. Guidelines for proposals are on the department's website (http://www.bates.edu/psychology/thesis/thesis-planning/senior-thesis-proposal-guidelines/). Candidates for the honors program are invited by the department from among those seniors conducting two-semester thesis projects who have shown a high degree of initiative and progress by the end of the fall semester. The faculty thesis advisor must assure the department that the student's work is of honors caliber and is progressing satisfactorily before the department invites the student.

In the fall semester, students in PSYC 457B meet in a seminar, and the instructor serves as advisor. In the winter semester, students who choose PSYC 458B must find an individual advisor. Students contemplating this option should talk to staff members in the community–based learning program of the Harward Center for Community Partnerships and to their instructor or advisor before contacting a placement site. Once a site is selected, students must submit an agreement, signed by a representative of the organization and by the student, with the thesis proposal.

All seniors must present their thesis work at a general meeting of the department at the end of the semester. Presentations take the form of a ten- to fifteen-minute talk or a poster that describes the project.

Pass/Fail Grading Option

Pass/fail grading may not be elected for courses applied toward the major.

Courses
PSYC 101. Principles of Psychology.
A course intended to provide students with a thorough and rigorous introduction to the study of behavior and mental processes. The course also prepares students for more advanced work in psychology and related fields. Fundamental psychological laws and principles of human behavior are examined in the light of the scientific method. The course is a prerequisite for all other courses in the department. Enrollment limited to 60 per section. Normally offered every semester. Staff.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

NS/PY 200. Introduction to Neuroscience.
In this course, students learn how the structure and function of the central and peripheral nervous systems support mind and behavior. Topics introduced include neuroanatomy, developmental neurobiology, neurophysiology, neuropharmacology, and neuropsychiatry. The course is aimed at prospective majors and nonmajors interested in exploring a field in which biology and psychology merge, and to which many other disciplines (e.g., chemistry, philosophy, anthropology, linguistics, computer science) have contributed. Prerequisite(s): PSYC 101 or any 100-level biology course. Not open to students who have received credit for PSYC 215. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 50. Normally offered every year. J. Castro, N. Koven.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

PY/SO 210. Social Psychology.
A study of people in social settings. Topics covered include conformity, interpersonal attraction, and attitude formation and change. Theoretical principles are applied to such social phenomena as social conflict, stereotyping, competition, and altruism. Prerequisite(s): PSYC 101. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 50. Normally offered every year. M. Sargent, H. Boucher.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

PSYC 211. Psychology of Personality.
This course introduces the fundamentals of personality psychology. Topics include a variety of personality theories, the trait debate, physiological factors that may shape personality, assessment of personality and approaches to personality research, and personality over the life-course. Readings include Freud, Erikson, Rogers, and research articles on abnormal psychology and personality. Prerequisite(s): PSYC 101. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 50. Normally offered every year. K. Aronson, K. Low.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

PSYC 215. Brain Matters.
This course explores how regulation and dysregulation of mind results from differential brain activity. Following an introduction to the structure and function of the central nervous system, students consider examples of neurological and psychiatric pathology and discuss psychological and neuroscientific approaches to intervention. Topics include neuronal signaling, neuroanatomy, neuroplasticity, psychopharmacology, states of consciousness, categories of mental illness, models of psychotherapy, and human/machine interactions. Prerequisite(s): PSYC 101. Not open to students who have received credit for NS/PY 200. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 50. N. Koven.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

PSYC 218. Statistics.
A course in the use of statistical methods for describing and drawing inferences from data. Experimental and correlational research designs are studied by analyzing data for numerous problems. Topics covered include sampling theory, correlation and regression, t-tests, chi-square tests, and analysis of variance. Prerequisite(s): PSYC 101 or NS/PY 200. Enrollment limited to 30. Normally offered every semester. [Q] Staff.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

PSYC 230. Cognitive Psychology.
This course provides an overview of contemporary research and theories concerning the structure and processes of the mind. Topics covered include information processing, artificial intelligence, sensory memory, masking effects, object recognition, attention, short-term/working memory, long-term memory, false memories, language, and decision making. Prerequisite(s): PSYC 101. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 50. Normally offered every year. T. Kahan.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

PSYC 235. Abnormal Psychology.
This course reviews the etiology, symptoms, and treatment of the major mental illnesses. Topics range from affective disorders to psychosomatic presentations to dissociative disorders. Students master diagnostic criteria, review case material, and evaluate research on a variety of topics related to psychopathology. Prerequisite(s): PSYC 101. Enrollment limited to 50. Normally offered every year. K. Low, N. Koven, R. Fraser-Thill.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

PSYC 240. Developmental Psychology.
A comprehensive introduction to current thinking and research in developmental psychology. This course covers prenatal development through old age and death. Topics include attachment, gender, language acquisition, play, and adolescent suicide. Prerequisite(s): PSYC 101. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 50. Normally offered every year. R. Fraser-Thill, G. Nigro.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

PSYC 250. Motivation and Emotion.
The course examines the mechanisms involved in activating and directing behavior and in forming, expressing, and perceiving emotions. Analysis includes evaluation of the role of physiological, environmental, and cognitive variables in mediating the following behavioral processes: thirst, hunger, sex, arousal, reward, stress, choice, consistency, and achievement. Prerequisite(s): PSYC 101. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 50. Offered with varying frequency. Staff.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

AS/PY 260. Cultural Psychology.
This course provides an introduction to the theoretical perspectives and research findings of cultural psychology, with an emphasis on comparisons between North American and East Asian cultural groups. Topics include defining culture as a topic of psychological inquiry; the methods of conducting cultural research; the debate between universality versus cultural specificity of psychological processes; acculturation and multiculturalism; and cultural influences on thought, emotion, motivation, personality, abnormality, and social behavior. Prerequisite(s): PSYC 101. Enrollment limited to 50. Normally offered every year. H. Boucher.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

PSYC 261. Research Methods.
This course provides comprehensive coverage of the major methods used in psychological research, with special emphasis on experimental design. Students receive extensive practice in designing, conducting, analyzing, and interpreting the results of research studies, and writing reports in American Psychological Association style. Prerequisite(s): PSYC 218. Enrollment limited to 15. [W2] Normally offered every semester. Staff.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

ED/PY 262. Community-Based Research Methods.
This course introduces research methods through collaborative community partnerships. Students collaborate with local professionals such as teachers on research projects that originate in their work sites. Class meetings introduce design issues, methods of data collection and analysis, and ways of reporting research. Prerequisite(s): PSYC 218 or EDUC 231. Enrollment limited to 15 per section. [W2] Normally offered every year. K. Aronson, G. Nigro.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

PSYC 302. Sensation and Perception.
The course examines the field of perception: how we organize and interpret sensory information so that we can understand the external world. Topics covered include principles of psychophysics; the eye and brain; pattern perception; color vision; perception of depth, size, and motion; hearing and auditory system; touch; taste; and smell. Prerequisite(s): PSYC 101. Enrollment limited to 20. Normally offered every year. T. Kahan.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

PSYC 303. Health Psychology.
This course introduces health psychology from a biopsychosocial perspective. The course first describes the theoretical underpinnings of the biopsychosocial model, and the fundamentals of anatomy and physiology. The course then reviews the current research on stress, coping and illness, and stress management techniques. Research on psychosocial contributors to heart disease, cancer, chronic pain syndromes, and other illnesses is reviewed, along with implications for prevention and treatment. Prerequisite(s): one of the following: NS/PY 200, PSYC 211, 215, 235, 242, or 250. Enrollment limited to 50. K. Low, S. Langdon.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

PSYC 305. Animal Learning.
The course examines historical and recent trends in animal learning. Topics include classical and operant conditioning, biological constraints on learning, and cognitive processes. Prerequisite(s): one of the following: NS/PY 200, PSYC 230 or 250. Staff.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

PSYC 307. Applied Social Psychology.
This course examines the application of social psychological theory and research methods to pressing social problems. Topics include violence, altruism, health, law, intergroup conflict, persuasion, and relationships. Prerequisite(s): PSYC 218. Enrollment limited to 25. A. Douglass.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

PSYC 311. Psychology of Religion.
This course examines religion from a social-psychological perspective, focusing on current psychological science to understand why some humans find religion compelling and the implications of religious faith (or lack thereof). Topics include the psychological benefits of religious faith, negative outcomes of religious faith, the role of religion in inter-group conflict, how thoughts of the divine affect perceptions of physical space, and how mental systems make sense of information about religion. Prerequisite(s): PSYC 218. Enrollment limited to 25. A. Douglass.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

PSYC 316. Community Psychology.
Community psychology is devoted to theory, research, and social action that promote positive well-being and prevent the prevention of problems in communities, groups, and individuals. As a field, it shares interests with clinical psychology, public health, sociology, and social work, but has developed its own unique perspective on issues. This course introduces students to major theories and concepts in the field; evaluates their implications for research, practice, and policy; and works in collaboration with community partners so students can put what they learn into action. Prerequisite(s): ED/PY 262 or PSYC 261. Enrollment limited to 16. G. Nigro.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

PSYC 317. Psychology and Law.
In the American criminal justice system, the administration of justice is influenced by a broad range of variables, many of which have been the subject of empirical research in social and cognitive psychology. This course examines how psychological research informs the dialogue surrounding controversial issues in the criminal justice system. Topics covered include eyewitness testimony, confession evidence, detection of deception, expert testimony, and reconstructed/repressed memories. Prerequisite(s): PSYC 261 or ED/PY 262. Enrollment limited to 25. Normally offered every year. A. Douglass.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

PSYC 320. Adolescence.
This course offers comprehensive coverage of contemporary theory and research on adolescent development. Topics include physical, cognitive, emotional, and identity development. Applying an ecological systems theory approach, each of these topics is nested within family, peer, cultural, and historical contexts. Prerequisite(s): One of the following: PSYC 211, 235, 240, 261, ED/PY 262, or AN/ED 378. Enrollment limited to 20. K. Aronson.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

PSYC 322. Child Psychopathology.
This course examines the development, maintenance, and treatment of emotional, behavioral, and mental disorders in children and adolescents. Topics include anxiety disorders, autism, mental retardation, eating disorders, conduct disorders, learning disorders, and mood disorders. Various theoretical viewpoints are considered. Prerequisite(s): PSYC 101. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 50. Staff.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

NS/PY 330. Cognitive Neuroscience.
This course explores how the neurological organization of the brain influences the way people think, feel, and act. Particular emphasis is given to the brain systems that support motor control, object recognition, spatial processing, attention, language, memory, executive functions, and emotion. Students also investigate clinical syndromes and unusual cognitive phenomena. A wide range of research techniques is introduced, including positron emission topography, functional magnetic resonance imaging, neuropsychological assessment, startle blink response, event-related potentials, magnetoencephalography, and transcranial magnetic stimulation. Prerequisite(s): NS/PY 200 or 363 or PSYC 215 or 230. Normally offered every year. N. Koven.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

PSYC 333. Advanced Topics in Abnormal Psychology.
A consideration of contemporary categories of abnormality from several points of view: psychoanalytic, biological, cognitive-behavioral, and existential. Additional topics include differential diagnosis, treatment methods, DSM-IV, and legal issues related to mental illness. Case materials and treatment strategies are also reviewed. Prerequisite(s): PSYC 218 and either 211, 235, or 242. Enrollment limited to 25. K. Low.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

PSYC 340. Infancy.
A seminar that examines the behavior, growth, and development of children from conception through two years of age. Topics include the perceptual, physical, cognitive, language, and social development of infants. The research methods used to study infants are introduced and discussed throughout the course. Weekly study of journal articles is designed to encourage a deeper understanding of these topics. Ethical issues in infancy are also considered. Prerequisite(s): PSYC 240 and PSYC 261 or ED/PY 262. Enrollment limited to 15. Staff.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

PSYC 341. Advanced Topics in Developmental Psychology.
A seminar that examines the concepts and methods of developmental psychology. Topics vary from year to year and may include the effects of new media, peer relations, physical and sexual abuse, and resilience in development. Prerequisite(s): PSYC 218 and 240. Enrollment limited to 20. R. Fraser-Thill, G. Nigro.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

PY/WS 343. Women, Culture, and Health.
This course examines a variety of perspectives on women's health issues, including reproductive health, body image, sexuality, substance use and abuse, mental health, cancer, AIDS, heart disease, poverty, work, violence, access to health care, and aging. Each topic is examined in sociocultural context, and the complex relationship between individual health and cultural demands or standards is explored. Prerequisite(s): PSYC 211, 215, 235, 242, or 303. K. Low.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

PSYC 360. Independent Study.
Students, in consultation with a faculty advisor, individually design and plan a course of study or research not offered in the curriculum. Course work includes a reflective component, evaluation, and completion of an agreed-upon product. Sponsorship by a faculty member in the program/department, a course prospectus, and permission of the chair are required. Students may register for no more than one independent study per semester. Normally offered every semester. Staff.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

PSYC 361. Topics in Affective Neuroscience.
A seminar that examines advances in the emerging interdisciplinary field of affective neuroscience. Topics may include methodology, cognitive components of emotion, emotion in personality and temperament, neuroscience of positive and negative affect, moral emotions, unconscious emotions, evolutionary perspectives of affect, emotion dysregulation and psychopathology, neuroethics and neurolaw, and neuroscience of fervor. Prerequisite(s): NS/PY 200 or PSYC 215. Not open to first-year students or sophomores. Enrollment limited to 15. N. Koven.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

PSYC 362. Psychopharmacology: How Drugs Affect Behavior.
This course examines the effects that drugs have on behavior, including the ability to cause addiction and to reduce neurologic and behavioral disorders such as Parkinson's disease, anxiety, ADHD, depression, and schizophrenia. By examining the effects of these drugs on neurotransmitters, students better understand how the brain mediates these behaviors. Attention is also paid to methodology, drug development, regulatory policy, and the role of pharmaceutical companies. Prerequisite(s): NS/PY 200, PSYC 215, 250, 305, or 330. Staff.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

NS/PY 363. Physiological Psychology.
The course is an introduction to the concepts and methods used in the study of physiological mechanisms underlying behavior. Topics include an introduction to neurophysiology and neuroanatomy; an examination of sensory and motor mechanisms; and the physiological bases of ingestion, sexual behavior, reinforcement, learning, memory, and abnormal behavior. Laboratory work includes examination of neuroanatomy, development of neurosurgical and histological skills, and behavioral testing of rodents. Prerequisite(s): NS/PY 200 or BI/NS 308. Normally offered every year. [L] J. Castro.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

PSYC 365. Special Topics.
Offered from time to time for small groups of students working with a faculty member on specialized projects or experiments. Prerequisite(s): PSYC 261 or ED/PY 262. Instructor permission is required. Staff.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

PSYC 370. Psychology of Women and Gender.
This course takes a critical look at psychology's theories and research about women and gender. Students examine topics such as menarche, mothering, and menopause from a variety of perspectives; the ways that race, ethnicity, class, sexual orientation, and age modify women's experiences are considered. The utility of psychological knowledge for effecting social change is explored. Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): one of the following: PSYC 261, ED/PY 262, INDS 250, or another research methodology course. G. Nigro.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

PY/SO 371. Prejudice and Stereotyping.
Two issues that have long held the interest of social psychologists and that are of great social importance are prejudice and stereotyping. This course explores traditional and contemporary social psychological research on unconscious and covert forms of prejudice as well as cognitive and emotional functions served by stereotyping. The course concludes with an examination of the challenges to prejudice reduction and stereotype change. Prerequisite(s): PSYC 218. Enrollment limited to 50. M. Sargent.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

PSYC 372. Racial and Ethnic Identity Development.
This course is designed to develop students' understanding of how individuals from different backgrounds come to define themselves in terms of race or ethnicity. Students explore theories that explain how racial/ethnic identity develops among individuals from Caucasian, African American, Asian, Hispanic, American Indian, and mixed race backgrounds. They also consider the role that others play in the identity development process and how identity relates to important life outcomes. As a final project, students are given the opportunity to analyze their own experience by applying course material to their own life through the creation of an autobiography. Prerequisite(s): PSYC 261 or ED/PY 262. Enrollment limited to 20. K. Aronson.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

PSYC 374. Psychology of Language.
This course examines language from psychological and linguistic perspectives. Topics covered include language acquisition, advantages and disadvantages of bilingualism, the relationship between language and thought, speech perception, word recognition and semantics, sentences and discourse, language production and slips of the tongue, the biological bases of language and language disorders, and the future of languages (focusing on language extinction). Prerequisite(s): PSYC 101. Recommended background: PSYC 230. Enrollment limited to 30. T. Kahan, K. Mathis.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

PSYC 375. Psychology of Sport and Exercise.
Sports and exercise are familiar physical experiences that have strong psychological components. This course examines the science and application of the biopsychosocial connections of these pursuits. Topics include arousal/anxiety, motivation, team cohesion and leadership, injury and stress, exercise adherence, and intervention strategies. Prerequisite(s): PSYC 261 or ED/PY 262. Enrollment limited to 25. S. Langdon.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

PSYC 380. Social Cognition.
Every day we characterize and evaluate other people, endeavor to understand the causes of their behavior, and try to predict their future actions. This course examines these social judgments and the cognitive processes upon which they depend. Topics include attribution theory, biases in social-information processing, impression formation, and stereotyping. Prerequisite(s): PSYC 218. Enrollment limited to 18. M. Sargent.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

PSYC 381. The Self.
This course is intended to provide intensive coverage of classic and contemporary theory and research regarding the self. Topics include self-knowledge, self-esteem, self-regulation, self-presentation/impression management, gender, and culture. Lectures and class discussions prepare the class for a student-driven group research project. Prerequisite(s): PSYC 261 or ED/PY 262. Recommended background: PSYC 210. Not open to students who have received credit for PSYC s33. Enrollment limited to 20. H. Boucher.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

PSYC 399. Junior-Senior Seminar in Biological Psychology.
A course designed to give junior and senior majors an opportunity to explore a significant new area in biological psychology. The topic changes from year to year and with the expertise of the faculty member. Possible topics include neural bases of additions, memory, sexual behavior, and stress. Prerequisite(s): one of the following: BI/NS 308 or NS/PY 330 or 363. Not open to students who have received credit for PSYC 401. Enrollment limited to 15. Staff.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

PSYC 457A. Senior Thesis/Empirical Research.
This type of thesis involves empirical research and report writing supplemented by individual conferences with an advisor. Students register for PSYC 457A in the fall semester or for PSYC 458A in the winter semester. Majors writing a two-semester or honors thesis register for both PSYC 457A and 458A. [W3] Normally offered every year. Staff.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

PSYC 457A, 458A. Senior Thesis/Empirical Research.
This type of thesis involves empirical research and report writing supplemented by individual conferences with an advisor. Students register for PSYC 457A in the fall semester or for PSYC 458A in the winter semester. Majors writing a two-semester or honors thesis register for both PSYC 457A and 458A. [W3] Normally offered every year. Staff.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

PSYC 457B. Senior Thesis/Community-Based Research.
This type of thesis involves community-based research and report writing in collaboration with a community partner and faculty advisor. Students complete 50 to 60 hours of work in a community placement and meet regularly for structured reflection about ethics, the cultural context of students' work, individual and social change, and other topics specific to students' placements. In the fall semester, students register for PSYC 457B and participate in a weekly seminar. In the winter semester, students register for PSYC 458B and engage in individual conferences with an advisor. Unless there are compelling circumstances that preclude it, students electing to complete a one-semester community-based research thesis are expected to do so in the fall seminar, rather than in the winter. Majors writing a two-semester or honor thesis register for both PSYC 457B and 458B. [W3] Normally offered every year. G. Nigro, K. Aronson.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

PSYC 457B, 458B. Senior Thesis/Community-Based Research.
This type of thesis involves community-based research and report writing in collaboration with a community partner and faculty advisor. Students complete 50 to 60 hours of work in a community placement and meet regularly for structured reflection about ethics, the cultural context of students' work, individual and social change, and other topics specific to students' placements. In the fall semester, students register for PSYC 457B and participate in a weekly seminar. In the winter semester, students register for PSYC 458B and engage in individual conferences with an advisor. Unless there are compelling circumstances that preclude it, students electing to complete a one-semester community-based research thesis are expected to do so in the fall seminar, rather than in the winter. Majors writing a two-semester or honor thesis register for both PSYC 457B and 458B. [W3] Normally offered every year. G. Nigro, K. Aronson.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

PSYC 457C. Senior Thesis/Theoretical Review and Integration.
This type of thesis involves a comprehensive and critical review of extant literature using resources available in Ladd Library and supplemented by individual conferences with an advisor. Students register for PSYC 457C in the fall semester or for PSYC 458C in the winter semester. Majors writing a two-semester or honors thesis register for both PSYC 457C and 458C. [W3] Normally offered every year. Staff.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

PSYC 457C, 458C. Senior Thesis/Theoretical Review and Integration.
This type of thesis involves a comprehensive and critical review of extant literature using resources available in Ladd Library and supplemented by individual conferences with an advisor. Students register for PSYC 457C in the fall semester or for PSYC 458C in the winter semester. Majors writing a two-semester or honors thesis register for both PSYC 457C and 458C. [W3] Normally offered every year. Staff.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

PSYC 458A. Senior Thesis/Empirical Research.
This type of thesis involves empirical research and report writing supplemented by individual conferences with adviser. Students register for PSYC 457A in the fall semester or for PSYC 458A in the winter semester. Majors writing a two-semester or honors thesis register for both PSYC 457A and 458A. [W3] Normally offered every year. Staff.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

PSYC 458B. Senior Thesis/Community-Based Research.
This type of thesis involves community-based research and report writing in collaboration with a community partner and faculty advisor. Students complete 50 to 60 hours of work in a community placement and meet regularly for structured reflection about ethics, the cultural context of students' work, individual and social change, and other topics specific to students' placements. In the fall semester, students register for Psychology 457B and participate in a weekly seminar. In the winter semester, students register for Psychology 458B and engage in individual conferences with an advisor. Unless there are compelling circumstances that preclude it, students electing to complete a one-semester community-based research thesis are expected to do so in the fall seminar, rather than in the winter. Majors writing a two-semester or honor thesis register for both Psychology 457B and 458B. [W3] Normally offered every year. G. Nigro, K. Aronson.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

PSYC 458C. Senior Thesis/Theoretical Review and Integration.
This type of thesis involves a comprehensive and critical review of extant literature using resources available in Ladd Library and supplemented by individual conferences with an advisor. Students register for PSYC 457C in the fall semester or for PSYC 458C in the winter semester. Majors writing a two-semester or honors thesis register for both PSYC 457C and 458C. [W3] Normally offered every year. Staff.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

Short Term Courses
INDS s15. Health, Culture, and Community.
This course examines dimensions of health through classroom and community-based experiences, with a special emphasis on current public health issues. The course covers the history and organization of public health; methods associated with health-related research; disparities in health, including those related to race, class, and gender; public policy and health; population-based approaches to public health; and cultural constructions of health and illness. The course is designed to be integrative: expertise from different disciplines is used to address current challenges in public health. Cross-listed in anthropology, biology, and psychology. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 30. K. Low.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

PSYC s19. Animal Cognition: Exploring the Minds of Birds, Bees, Chimps, and Dolphins.
The goals of this course are to introduce students to the basic principles of comparative cognition by examining the mental abilities of several nonhuman species and to convey the importance of studying these animals for their survival. In order to achieve these goals, students in this course 1) are provided with a general historical and evolutionary framework in which to consider cognitive functioning, 2) discuss an extensive reading list during class sessions, and 3) visit the laboratories of distinguished researchers in the field of animal cognition. Prerequisite(s): PSYC 101. Enrollment limited to 16. Instructor permission is required. T. Kahan, K. Mathis.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

PSYC s29. The Psychology of Humor.
This course examines how psychological theory and research have been brought to bear on the study of humor. Topics include nonverbal and verbal humor, humor production and judgment, the psychobiology of humor, cognition and humor, social/cultural aspects of humor, sense of humor as a personality trait, and humor and health. Daily readings include books, review chapters, theoretical papers, and empirical reports that emphasize experimental methods and the analysis of quantitative data. Class sessions include a combination of lecture, student presentations, discussion, films, videos, and activities, including one or more field trips. Prerequisite(s): PSYC 218. This course has an additional fee. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 15. H. Boucher.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

PSYC s30. Contemporary Psychotherapies with Practicum.
This course surveys a variety of contemporary psychotherapies, ranging from dynamic approaches to behavior modification. The course is "hands on," in that students are asked to role-play therapy sessions on videotape as part of the course requirements and practice a variety of therapeutic techniques. The course also includes opportunities to observe treatment on videotape. Prerequisite(s): PSYC 235. Enrollment limited to 20. K. Low.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

PSYC s31. Forensic Psychology.
Students explore the roles that psychologists play in the criminal justice system when the defendant's state of mind is at issue. These roles often involve evaluating a defendant to provide an opinion to the court on the defendant's competence to stand trial; state of mind at the time of offense; and competence to waive Miranda rights, treatment recommendations, and dispositional alternatives. Topics covered include evaluation methodology, malingering, assessment of juveniles, sex offenders, psychopaths, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia. Issues are explored through examination of cases, relevant empirical literature, media coverage of current cases, and review of court decisions. Prerequisite(s): PSYC 218 and 211 or 235. Enrollment limited to 30. Instructor permission is required. Staff.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

PSYC s34. Psychological Perspectives on Sex, Reputation, and Power.
Much of human social activity is in the pursuit of sex, desirable reputation, and power. In this course students consider behavioral and social science research on these and related topics, emphasizing debates about the evolutionary underpinnings of contemporary phenomena. The course engages students in the process of conducting such research themselves. Topics include sexual behavior, mate selection, interindividual dominance, group-based hierarchies (e.g., caste systems), and negotiation. Course activities include daily readings of empirical reports (relying predominantly on advanced statistical methods), discussion, field trips, and laboratory projects. Students must be prepared to view media that include violence and sexually explicit content. Prerequisite(s): BIO 244 or PSYC 218. Enrollment limited to 30. M. Sargent.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

PSYC s35. Psychology and the Media.
Psychology is pervasive in our culture, found in the movies, popular books, magazines, newspapers, and on television, among other venues. This course examines the quality of the psychological information offered to the general public, the manner in which psychology is currently portrayed in popular culture, the rift between psychological science and the media, the difference between science and pseudoscience, and the strengths and weaknesses of psychology "popularizers" of the past. The course concludes with hands-on practice in writing about psychology for the general public in a responsible, critical, and thoughtful manner. Prerequisite(s): PSYC 101 and 261 or ED/PY 262. Enrollment limited to 30. Staff.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

PSYC s36. Diversity in Adolescence.
Adolescence is the transition between childhood and adulthood that is marked by many physical, cognitive, and socioemotional changes. One's psychosocial culture influences the process and experience of this developmental stage. This course examines adolescent development from a variety of psychosocial perspectives including race, religion, disability, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, and gender. The goals are for students to understand adolescent development, encounter different experiences of being in the world, and explore this life stage within some of its contextual framework. The course includes readings, discussions, and experiential activities including field trips. Prerequisite(s): PSYC 240, 242, or 260. This course has a fee of $300. Enrollment limited to 20. S. Langdon.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

PSYC s46. Internship in Psychology.
Participation in off-campus research or service-learning opportunities. Internships are made by specific arrangement and require departmental approval. Normally offered every year. Staff.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

PSYC s50. Independent Study.
Students, in consultation with a faculty advisor, individually design and plan a course of study or research not offered in the curriculum. Course work includes a reflective component, evaluation, and completion of an agreed-upon product. Sponsorship by a faculty member in the program/department, a course prospectus, and permission of the chair are required. Students may register for no more than one independent study during a Short Term. Normally offered every year. Staff.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations