Catalog


Extradisciplinary Studies

Extradisciplinary courses are those that fall outside the domain of the college's existing departments and programs. They are listed in the Catalog and Schedule of Courses with a subject header of "EXDS."

Courses

EXDS 115. Bates Science Fellows.

What does it mean to "think like a scientist"? In this course, students apply knowledge and skills from other science and mathematics courses to the study of contemporary issues in science. This year-long sequence integrates scientific and quantitative concepts commonly covered in first-year science and math courses. With readings, class discussions, individual and group work, students examine and analyze case studies and the scientific literature on various topics. Throughout the course, emphasis is given to how we develop and understand scientific knowledge. One-half course credit is granted upon completion of the course. Corequisite(s): one of the following: any 100-level biology or geology course; CHEM 107A; FYS 274; MATH 105, 106, 205 or 206; NRSC 160; NS/PH 117; or PHYS 107. Not open to students who have received credit for INDS 115. Enrollment limited to 12. Instructor permission is required. Normally offered every year. J. Smedley.

EXDS 116. Bates Science Fellows.

A continuation of EXDS 115. One-half course credit is granted upon completion of the course. Prerequisite(s): EXDS 115. Corequisite(s): one of the following: any 100-level geology course; BIO 190; CHEM 108A; MATH 105, 106, 205 or 206; or PHYS 108. Not open to students who have received credit for INDS 116. Enrollment limited to 12. Instructor permission is required. Normally offered every year. J. Smedley.

EXDS 201. Writing across the Curriculum, Composition, Writing Center Theory.

This course, which is taken concurrently with student’s first semester as a Writing Fellow with Writing at Bates, introduces students to the academic field of composition studies, approaching the topic through an in-depth study of the higher education writing center. The course includes a survey of the rhetoric and composition literature, the Writing across the Curriculum (WAC) movement, and the theories that underlie current best practices in college and university writing programs. Students practice using writing as a tool for learning and critical thinking, and receive the training and background necessary to engage Bates faculty as partners in the teaching of writing. The course is open to students with an interest in the course material and who are not serving as Writing Fellows, with permission from the instructor. Enrollment limited to 39. Instructor permission is required. [W2] Normally offered every year. D. Sanford.

EXDS 215. Bates Science Fellows II.

What does it mean to practice science? What are some ways scientists apply their knowledge, skills and research to contemporary concerns in the sciences, as broadly defined? How do scientists learn from each other and work collaboratively? In the first of a yearlong sequence (EXDS 215 and EXDS 216), students integrate scientific and quantitative concepts from their mathematics and science courses through readings, discussions, individual work, and group projects. The course emphasizes the development and understanding of scientific knowledge and its applications to the practice of science, with some focus on the life sciences. One-half course credit is granted upon completion of the course. Corequisite(s): any science or mathematics course. Open only to sophomores. Enrollment limited to 12. Instructor permission is required. Normally offered every year. K. Palin.

EXDS 216. Bates Science Fellows II.

A continuation of EXDS 215. One-half course credit is granted upon completion of the course. Prerequisite(s): EXDS 215. Corequisite(s): any science or mathematics course. Open only to sophomores. Enrollment limited to 12. Instructor permission is required. Normally offered every year. K. Palin.
Short Term Courses

EXDS s11. Financial Accounting.

This course is an introduction to the framework, basic concepts, and generally accepted accounting principles and standards underlying financial accounting systems. Students learn to analyze and record financial transactions form a source document through the entire accounting cycle. Accounting concepts include merchandising operations, inventory costing methods, internal controls and cash, receivables, liabilities, and long-term assets including intangibles. Students create basic financial statements and apply analytical tools to these and to statements from real companies. Additionally, ethical issues in accounting are discussed as relevant topics arise. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 29. Normally offered every year. Staff.