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Gender and Sexuality Studies

Professors Ewing (Environmental Studies), Herzig (Gender and Sexuality Studies), Kane (Sociology), and Rand (Art and Visual Culture and Gender and Sexuality Studies, chair); Associate Professors Beasley (African American Studies and American Cultural Studies), and Hill (Politics); Visiting Associate Professor Plastas (Gender and Sexuality Studies); Assistant Professors González Valencia (Art and Visual Culture) and Robert (Geology)



The Program in Gender and Sexuality Studies analyzes local and global entanglements of knowledge, power, pleasure, and resistance. Drawing on histories of anti-racist, decolonial, feminist, queer, and trans work, courses examine shifting dynamics of privilege, exclusion, and marginalization. The program also cultivates action, practice, and reciprocal engagement with the many communities of which we are part. To study gender and sexuality in these ways is to refute simple assertions about identity in favor of richly detailed accounts of the specific conditions through which particular social positions are maintained and transgressed. Students may choose to either major or minor in gender and sexuality studies.

The Program in Gender and Sexuality Studies was formerly the Program in Women and Gender Studies. Students who entered the college before fall 2017 and who major or minor in this program are women and gender studies majors or minors. Students entering the college in fall 2017 and thereafter are gender and sexuality studies majors or minors. The program codes that accompany course numbers have changed from WGS to GSS and from WS to GS. More information on the gender and sexuality studies program is available on the website (bates.edu/gender).

Major Requirements. Students must complete ten courses, including:

1) All of the following:
GSS 100. Introduction to Gender and Sexuality Studies.
AA/GS 201. Race, Ethnicity, and Feminist Thought.
INDS 250. Interdisciplinary Studies: Methods and Modes of Inquiry.
GSS 400. Junior-Senior Seminar.

Majors should try to take GSS 100 and INDS 250 before the end of the sophomore year.

2) Additional Courses. Five additional courses offered by gender and sexuality studies or program-approved courses offered by other departments and programs. At least two of these five courses must be at the 300 or 400 level. No more than one Short Term course may be counted toward the major. The list below includes committee-approved first-year seminars and courses from other departments and programs that may also be used to fulfill major or minor requirements:

ENG 238. Jane Austen: Then and Now.
FYS 135. Women in Art.
FYS 177. Sex and Sexualities.
FYS 305. Corporal Culture: Body and Health in America.
FYS 346. Desire, Devotion, Suffering.
PLTC 297. The Household and Political Theory.
RHET 260. Lesbian and Gay Images in Film.
RHET 265. The Rhetoric of Women's Rights.

3) GSS 457, 458. Senior Thesis.

Students should consult the program chair about transfer credits or other courses that may be used toward fulfillment of major or minor requirments.

The gender and sexuality studies course list represents only those courses which are currently part of the Bates curriculum. Because of the interdisciplinary nature of the program, many courses in gender and sexuality studies have prerequisites in other departments. Majors should plan their schedules carefully and are urged to consult regularly with the chair to ensure that their program has both breadth and depth.

Senior Thesis. Planning for the senior thesis should begin in the junior year. In consultation with the chair of the program, each student chooses a thesis advisor according to the subject matter of the thesis. With the assistance of the thesis advisor, each major submits a thesis proposal to the faculty Committee on Gender and Sexuality Studies according to a schedule determined by the program. Students should consult the program website for thesis guidelines and a schedule of deadlines.

Pass/Fail Grading Option. Aside from the thesis, which must be taken for a grade, there are no restrictions on the use of the pass/fail option within the major.

Minor. A minor in gender and sexuality consists of GSS 100, AA/GS 201, INDS 250, GSS 400, at least one other 300- or 400-level gender and sexuality studies course, and two other committee-approved courses. No more than one Short Term course may be counted toward the minor.

Pass/Fail Grading Option. There are no restrictions on the use of the pass/fail option within the minor.

Courses

GSS 100. Introduction to Gender and Sexuality Studies.

Interdisciplinary, intersectional study of gender and sexuality in cross-cultural and historical perspective. Emphasis is given to the diversities of race, class, ethnicity, age, (dis)ability, sexuality, nationality, and religion. Not open to students who have received credit for WGST 100. Enrollment limited to 39. Normally offered every year. Staff.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

EN/GS 121G. Asian American Women Writers.

This course examines from a sociohistorical perspective fictional, autobiographical, and critical writings by Asian American women including Meena Alexander, Sui Sin Far, Gish Jen, Maxine Hong Kingston, Tahira Naqvi, Cathy Song, Jhumpa Lahiri, and Hisaye Yamamoto. Students explore their concerns with personal and cultural identity, as both Asian and American, as females, as minorities, and often as postcolonial subjects. The course highlights the varied immigration and social histories of women from different Asian countries, often homogenized as "Oriental" in mainstream American cultural representations. Not open to students who have received credit for EN/WS 121G. Enrollment limited to 25. (Race, Ethnicity, or Diasporic Literature.) (Post-1800.) L. Dhingra, T. Salter.
Concentrations

INDC 130. Food in Ancient Greece and Rome.

Participants in this course study food in ancient Greece and Rome: the history of the food supply for agrarian and urban populations; malnutrition, its probable impact on ancient economies, and its uneven impact on populations; famine; the symbolism of the heroic banquet—a division of the sacrificial animal among ranked members of society, and between men and gods; cuisine and delicacies of the rich; forbidden food; the respective roles of men and women in food production, and their unequal access to food supply; dietary transgression; and sacred food. Cross-listed in classical and medieval studies, gender and sexuality studies, and history. Not open to students who have received credit for CMS s28. Enrollment limited to 49. (European.) (Premodern.) D. O'Higgins.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

GS/PT 155. Gender, Power, and Political Systems.

This course scrutinizes several sites where power is produced—constitutions, international politics, political theory, voting, social movements, and globalization— in order to assess the impact of gender on the status, behavior, and authority of different political actors. Recognizing how race, class, sexuality, and citizen status matter, students consider why women are under-represented in nearly all governments and how women make more of a difference in national and global politics than the images of "men in suits" imply. Students examine questions, concepts, and theories which acknowledge women's political agency and help access their influence across a range—ancient to emerging—of political systems. Not open to students who have received credit for PT/WS 155. Enrollment limited to 39. (Identities and Interests.) (Philosophical, Literary, and Legal Studies.) L. Hill.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

AA/GS 201. Race, Ethnicity, and Feminist Thought.

While all courses in the gender and sexuality studies program examine gender in relation to other critical categories of social identity and experience, this course focuses on race, ethnicity, and national power at their intersections with gender. Using perspectives from the social sciences, the humanities, and critical-race, womanist, feminist, and queer theories, students examine feminist efforts at self-definition and self-sufficiency, as well as feminist contributions to knowledge, social and political activism, and theorizing. Not open to students who have received credit for AA/WS 201. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 29. Normally offered every year. L. Hill.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

GSS 202. Queer and Trans Sports Studies.

This course brings queer studies and trans studies perspectives to sport, looking at practice, representation, discourse, and relations among them. Topics include the reach into the lives of all athletes of gender binarism and gender segregation; the regulation of transgender, gender nonconforming, and intersex athletes, including the delineation of those categories, in the context of other discourses around human variation in sport; the roles of raced masculinities, femininities, heteronormativities, and homonormativities in the valuation of athleticism, athletes, and sports; and issues from pleasure to pink-washing surrounding the participation of queer-identified people in recreational, competitive, and professional sport. Recommended background: one course on the study of gender, sexuality, queer studies, trans studies, and/or sports studies. Not open to students who have received credit for WGST 202. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 29. [W2] E. Rand.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

GS/RE 203. Women, Gender, and Islam.

The course introduces normative Islamic traditions and Islamic discourses about women and gender from inception of the religion in the seventh century C.E. to the present day. It surveys Muslim women's experiences across a broad span of historical periods and cultural arenas, from the Middle East, Asia, and Africa to Europe and North America. Encouraging a critical postcolonial reflexive perspective and emphasizing Muslim women's voices and historical agency, the course draws on a range of scholarly disciplines and methods including historical, anthropological, literary, and art historical studies to explore understandings beyond common stereotypes of "the oppressed Muslim woman." Recommended background: GSS 100. Not open to students who have received credit for RE/WS 203. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 39. Staff.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

CM/GS 204. Gender and the Body in Ancient Greece.

How did people in ancient Greece think about the categories of male and female? How did these categories intersect with others, such as social status, age, and ethnicity? This course considers issues of gender in archaic and classical Greece and looks at how Greek people thought about the body, sexuality, and "transgressive" behavior and individuals. Students analyze literary texts (in translation) as well as medical, religious, and legal evidence—inscriptional and textual—and modern scholarship. Not open to students who have received credit for CM/WS 204. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 35. D. O'Higgins.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

GS/RE 207. Eve, Adam, and the Serpent.

This course examines the historical formation of Genesis 1–3 against the background of its literary, cultural, and historical context and its subsequent interpretation and use in Jewish, Christian, and Islamic traditions. Special attention is given to the ways in which the biblical texts have been interpreted and used to imagine, promote, and justify social orders — both hierarchical and egalitarian — as well as how the construction of gender relations links to the ways in which other social institutions are articulated and justified. Topics include the creation of the cosmos, characterizations of the Creator, the origins and perfection of humanity, the origins of evil, and the nature of the garden. Not open to students who have received credit for RE/WS 207. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 39. C. Baker.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

GS/PT 219. Social Movements in Latin America.

Social movements have often played key roles in Latin American politics. In the 1980s, grassroots movements against dictatorships raised hopes that poor and marginalized groups might spur processes of democratization and development. In the new democratic regimes, however, significant social and economic inequalities persist, marking political and social space in acute ways. This course explores the struggle by poor and marginalized groups for space, both theoretically and literally, through examination of rural landless movements, urban squatter movements, LGBT movements, and women's movements in the region. Not open to students who have received credit for PLTC 219. Enrollment limited to 29. (Governance and Conflict.) (Identities and Interests.) J. Longaker.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

GS/PT 220. Gender, War, and Peace.

This course uses gender as an analytical tool to examine the history of war and peace. How do war and militarization construct masculinities and femininities? What types of roles have women played in the making of war and in the making of peace? How has gender socialization influenced people's analysis of and participation in war and in peace activism? What are the gender politics of the politics of war and of peacemaking? How is gender deployed in current war zones and in current movements for peace? Recommended background: GSS 100. Not open to students who have received credit for GS/PT s12, or PT/WS 220 or s12. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 29. (Governance and Conflict.) (Political Economy.) M. Plastas.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

INDC 238. Queer Power: Political Sociology of U.S. Sexuality Movements.

This course introduces students to social movement theory and interest group politics in the United States via the case study of gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) politics from the immediate post-World War II period to the present, and examines the relationship of sexuality to the racial and gender dynamics of American identity-based social movements. The course traces the development of research methodologies to study collective action from early rational choice models to resource mobilization theory to new social movement models and political opportunity and process models. How the LGBTQ movements drew upon, expanded, and challenged foundations established by both African American civil rights and feminism is also explored. A range of source materials includes political science, sociology, and history monographs and articles, primary source documents, literature, and film. Cross-listed in gender and sexuality studies, politics, and sociology. Enrollment limited to 29. (Identities and Interests.) (Institutional Politics.) S. Engel.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

GS/PT 245. Democratizing States and Gender Politics.

How do gender politics shape democracy? Does political change create opportunities for increasing women's representation in politics, leadership, and access to decision making? Under what circumstances do women oppose authoritarian regimes? How does gender affect the development of democractic governance? This course uses a comparative approach to investigate cases of regime change and democratization in Latin America, Eastern and Central Europe, the Middle East, and sub-Saharan Africa in order to understand whether and how political change creates possibilities for democratizing gender relations and politics. Not open to students who have received credit for PT/WS 245. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 29. (Identities and Interests.) L. Hill.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

GSS 248. Queer Studies.

This course considers the production and regulation of gender and sexuality in relation to norms of identity, social organization, and embodiment, and the interconnections of queer sexualities and queer genders with each other and with race, economic status, citizenship, and other axes of difference. While the course engages the body of scholarship understood in the 1990s and beyond to form a field called "Queer Theory," it also focuses on activist and scholarly work generated before, outside, and against its boundaries, especially in queer of color critique and trans studies, with central attention to lives and thinking of people embodying or associates with marginalized genders and sexualities. Recommended background: one course on the study of gender, sexuality, queer studies, and/or trans studies. Not open to students who have received credit for EN/WS 248. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 29. (Community-Engaged Learning.) [W2] Normally offered every year. S. Engel, E. Osucha, E. Rand.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

INDC 250. Interdisciplinary Studies: Methods and Modes of Inquiry.

Interdisciplinarity involves more than a meeting of disciplines. Practitioners stretch methodological norms and reach across disciplinary boundaries. Through examination of a single topic, this course introduces students to interdisciplinary methods of analysis. Students examine what practitioners actually do and work to become practitioners themselves. Cross-listed in African American studies, American cultural studies, and gender and sexuality studies. Prerequisite(s): AAS 100, ACS 100, or GSS 100, and one other course in African American studies, American cultural studies, or gender and sexuality studies. Enrollment limited to 39. Staff.
Interdisciplinary Programs

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

GS/PT 254. Gender Matters: U.S. Women and Politics.

What difference has women's visible entry into U.S. politics over the last forty years made in the everyday lives of most women? Just as idealized notions of gender have molded politics since America's founding, politics shapes women's and men's lives as citizens, workers, and parents. How does gender make a difference when leaders are selected, policy agendas are set, and resources are allocated? How do women's participation and influence—as decisive voters, social movement activists, persuasive legislators, and presidential candidates—affect the conduct of politics or our thinking about policy priorities? This course recognizes U.S. women—variously positioned in racial, class, sexual, and cultural communities—as political subjects and reviews concepts, frameworks, and theories used to make sense of both changes and continuity in women's status, participation, and influence on public life and decision making. Not open to students who have received credit for PT/WS 254. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 29. (Identities and Interests.) (Institutional Politics.) L. Hill.
Concentrations

GS/PL 262. Philosophy and Feminism.

One central project of feminist philosophy is the use of philosophical methods to think carefully about important and distinctive features of the lives of women, and also about the concepts employed in the feminist political movement and similar social movements, such as those centered around race, class, disability, and sexuality. Topics include: what it is to be a woman; what it is to face discrimination or oppression; science and society, particularly genders in science; sex and sexuality; reproduction; the family; gender in popular culture; and the body and appearance, including the fashion and beauty industries. Not open to students who have received credit for PHIL 262 or PL/WS 262. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 29. Normally offered every year. S. Stark, L. Ashwell.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

INDC 267. Blood, Genes, and American Culture.

Places recent popular and scientific discussions of human heredity and genetics in broader social, political, and historical context, focusing on shifting definitions of personhood. Topics include the ownership and exchange of human bodies and body parts, the development of assisted reproductive technologies, and the emergence of new forms of biological citizenship. Recommended background: course work in biology and/or gender and sexuality studies. Cross-listed in African American studies, American cultural studies, and gender and sexuality studies. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 39. R. Herzig.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

GS/SO 270. Sociology of Gender.

This course focuses on the social construction of gender through a consideration of a series of interrelated social institutions and practices central to gender stratification. Emphasis is placed on the intersections between gender inequality and inequalities of race/ethnicity, class, sexual orientation, and nation. Recommended background: one previous course in gender and sexuality studies or sociology. Not open to students who have received credit for SO/WS 270. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 29. (Community-Engaged Learning.) E. Kane.
Concentrations

AN/GS 275. Cross-Cultural Perspectives on Gender and Sexuality.

Comparative analysis of the social construction of gender in a wide range of contemporary societies, focusing on the contrast among African, South American, and North Atlantic notions of gender identity and gender relations. Students work toward a deeper understanding of gender diversity, confronting their own cultural assumptions. Not open to students who have received credit for AN/WS 275. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 29. (Community-Engaged Learning.) Normally offered every year. E. Eames.
Concentrations

GS/PT 282. Constitutional Law II: Rights and Identities.

This course introduces students to constitutional interpretation and development in civil rights and race equality jurisprudence, gender equality jurisprudence, sexual orientation law, and matters related to privacy and autonomy (particularly sexual autonomy involving contraception and abortion access). Expanding, contracting, or otherwise altering the meaning of a right involves a range of actors in a variety of venues, not only courts. Therefore, students consider rights from a "law and society" perspective, which focuses on analyzing judicial rulings as well as evaluating the social conceptualization, representation, and grassroots mobilization around these rights. Prerequisite(s): PLTC 216. Recommended background: PLTC 115. Not open to students who have received credit for PT/WS 282. Enrollment limited to 29. (Identities and Interests.) (Philosophical, Literary, and Legal Studies.) S. Engel.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

AV/GS 287. Gender and Visual Culture.

This course concerns gender in the making and viewing of visual culture, with emphasis on the later twentieth and early twenty-first centuries, and the roles of visual culture in the construction of gendered identities. Topics include the use of the visual in artistic, political, and historical representations of gendered people; queer and trans genderings; the visualization of gender in relation to race, ethnicity, nationality, class, age, sex, and sexuality; and matters of censorship, circulation, and resources that affect the cultural production of people oppressed and/or marginalized by sex and/or gender. Not open to students who have received credit for AV/WS 287. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 29. (Race, Sexuality, Gender.) [W2] E. Rand.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

GS/PT 292. Freedom in an Age of Constraints.

Is freedom a concept, a principle, or a practice? Is capitalism the scene of human domination, human freedom, or both? What is the relationship between one’s social identity and freedom—is it liberating or imprisoning? What is the relationship of political freedom to power, equality, and community? In this course, students consider these kinds of questions by reading classics in Western political theory, including Dostoyevski, Rousseau, and Marx, and by analyzing contemporary writings on feminist and queer politics, Black Lives Matter, contemporary capitalism, and more. Recommended background: PLTC 191. Not open to students who have received credit for PT/WS 292. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 29. (Identities and Interests.) (Philosophical, Literary, and Legal Studies.) N. Hagel.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

INDC 301A. Sex and the Modern City: European Cultures at the Fin-de-Siècle.

Economic and political change during the 1800s revolutionized the daily lives of Europeans more profoundly than any previous century. By the last third of the century, the modern city became the stage for exploring and enacting new roles, new gender identities in particular. This course examines the cultural reverberations of these cataclysmic changes by focusing on sex, gender, and new urban spaces the decades around the turn of the twentieth century. Students consider the writings of Zola and Freud, investigate middle-class flirtations with the occult, and read about sensational crimes like those of Jack the Ripper. Cross-listed in European studies, gender and sexuality studies, and history. Enrollment limited to 15. (European.) (Modern. ) [W2] C. Shaw.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

GS/HI 301Q. A Woman's Place: Gender and Geography in the United States, 1800–Present.

Using a case study approach, this course looks at diverse American women from the early 1800s to the present and how they shaped, traversed, and contested the spaces they inhabited or were assigned, whether public or private, rural or urban, temporary or lifelong. Not open to students who have received credit for HI/WS 301Q. Enrollment limited to 15. (Modern. ) (United States.) [W2] M. Creighton.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

INDC 301Z. Race and U.S. Women's Movements.

This course focuses on how racial formations develop in women's movements and how gender ideologies take shape through racialization. Some of the movements examined include the woman's suffrage movement, the anti-lynching movement, the civil rights movement, moral reform movements, the welfare rights movement, the women's liberation movement, and the peace movement. Students analyze how the intertwined categories of race and gender shape various women's responses to debates about issues including citizenship, U.S. foreign policy, reproductive rights, and immigration. Students consider current theoretical and methodological debates and examine the topic through the perspectives of women in various ethnic and racial groups. Cross-listed in gender and sexuality studies, history, and politics. Prerequisite(s): one course in gender and sexuality studies. Enrollment limited to 15. (Identities and Interests.) (Institutional Politics.) (Modern. ) (United States.) [W2] M. Plastas.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

GS/PT 302. Gender, Sexuality, and Conflict.

This course considers gender-based dimensions of war and its bi-products (participation in violence, human trafficking, poverty, lack of environmental resources, corruption). What are the different risks that people experience based on gender? Does an increase in conflict imply an increase in sexual violence? Students will explore these issues in a global context. New course beginning Winter 2018. Enrollment limited to 15. (Governance and Conflict.) [W2] One-time offering. C. Abdo-Katsipis.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

INDC 302. Black Feminist Activist and Intellectual Traditions.

This junior-senior seminar examines the intersections of gender with black racial and ethnic identities as they have been and are constructed, expressed, and lived throughout the African/black diaspora. Special attention is given to the United States but substantial consideration is given to Africa, the Caribbean, Latin America, Canada, Europe, and Australia. The course combines approaches and methodologies employed in the humanities, social sciences, and arts to structure interdisciplinary analyses. Using black feminist (womanist), critical-race, and queer theories, students examine African-descended women’s histories, activism, resistance, and contributions to culture, knowledge, and theorizing. Crosslisted in African American studies, American cultural studies, and gender and sexuality studies. Prerequisite(s): one course in African American studies, American cultural studies, or gender and sexuality studies. Enrollment limited to 15. S. Houchins.
Interdisciplinary Programs

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

GS/RE 310. Gender and Judaism.

In this course, students explore aspects of Jewish culture and images of Jews and Judaism through the lenses of gender and sexuality. They examine ideologies, images, and practices from Jewish traditions with an eye to the ways in which gender and sexuality are constructed, maintained, contested, and/or transformed through them. Feminist Jews and Judaism serve as sources for insight and critique as well as constructive resources for religious reflection, ritual, and visions of Judaism's future. Not open to students who have received credit for RE/WS 310. Enrollment limited to 15. C. Baker.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

GS/RE 311. Buddhism and Gender.

This course examines the role of gender in Buddhist communities from the inception of the religious tradition to the modern day. How has gender identity influenced the development of this tradition? Where do we see gender in Buddhist literature, doctrine, and art? How do modern ideas of what "Buddhism" is affect change in the North American context, and how is this different from the Buddhist past? The course draws on a variety of sources, including literary, cinematic, and visual materials, to answer these questions. Special attention is given to how gender is presented in doctrinal texts, and the (dis)connection between these documents and the lived experiences of Buddhist people, as presented in interviews and autobiographies by Buddhist practitioners from a variety of moments and communities. Not open to students who have received credit for RE/WS 311. Enrollment limited to 15. [W2] A. Melnick.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

GS/SP 323. Gendered Experiences in the Américas Borderlands.

Students become acquainted with testimonies, film, comics, and fiction and nonfiction narratives that engage border tensions and issues of immigration in English and Spanish. Concepts such as sense of place, mobility, and permanence; histories of place; place of enunciation; transnational migration; and transnational historical networks are utilized as critical lenses to analyze gendered experiences of migration. All discussions and written assignments are in Spanish. Recommended background: SPAN 230. Prerequisite(s): one 200-level Spanish course above SPAN 211. Only open to juniors and seniors. Not open to students who have received credit for SP/WS 323. Enrollment limited to 15. C. Aburto Guzmán.
Concentrations

GS/PT 326. The Politics of Authenticity.

Is there such a thing as an authentic self? If so, can politics help us realize it? In this writing-attentive course, students discuss what the politics of authenticity is or might be, how it has been conceptualized in American politics and Western political theory, and why it has become an object of widespread suspicion and continuing appeal. Students examine how authenticity has been posited and contested in three different domains: in the history of Western political thought; in feminist, queer, and transgender writings; and in discussions of race. Authors include Rousseau, Freud, Butler, Malcolm X, Yoshino, and Coates. Not open to students who have received credit for PT/WS 326. Enrollment limited to 15. (Identities and Interests.) (Philosophical, Literary, and Legal Studies.) [W2] N. Hagel.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

GSS 335. Tobacco: Gender Matters.

In the opening episode of the television show Mad Men, entitled "Smoke Gets in Your Eyes," cigarettes feature as the primary signifier of mid-twentieth-century social norms and cultural divides. As Mad Men suggests, tobacco matters to our ability to understand the formation of cultural values and divides. In this reading- and research-intensive seminar, students use gender and queer theory to examine the global history of tobacco production, consumption, and control. Through historical and comparative study they consider the role of tobacco in shaping ideas about gender, race, ethnicity, sexuality, and class. Topics include the political economy of tobacco, tobacco control movements, tobacco and human rights, and health equity. Prerequisite(s): GSS 100. Not open to students who have received credit for GS/PT s14, PT/WS s14, or WGST 335. Enrollment limited to 15. (Community-Engaged Learning.) M. Plastas.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

INDC 342. Performance, Narrative, and the Body.

This course examines the politics of the body through the inter/transdisciplinary frames of the narrative and performance, including the specific ways performance and narrative theories of the body and cultural practices operate in everyday life and social formations. Students examine how the "body" is performed and how narrative is constructed in a variety of different contexts such as race, gender, disease, sexuality, and culture. The course places narrative and performance at the center (rather than the margins) of inquiry, asking how far and how deeply performativity reaches into our lives and how performances construct our identities, differences, and our bodies: who we are and who we can become. Cross-listed in African American studies, anthropology, and gender and sexuality studies. Prerequisite(s): GSS 100. Recommended background: course work in African American studies, American cultural studies, anthropology, gender and sexuality studies, politics, or sociology. Enrollment limited to 15. M. Beasley.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

GS/PY 343. Women, Culture, and Health.

This course examines a variety of perspectives on women's health issues, including reproductive health, body image, sexuality, substance use and abuse, mental health, cancer, AIDS, heart disease, poverty, work, violence, access to health care, and aging. Each topic is examined in sociocultural context, and the complex relationship between individual health and cultural demands or standards is explored. Prerequisite(s): AS/PY 260; NS/PY 160 or 200; or PSYC 211, 215, 235, 242, or 303. Not open to students who have received credit for PY/WS 343. Enrollment limited to 49. (Diversity.) Staff.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

GS/SP 344. Gendering Social Awareness in Contemporary Spain.

In this course, students use gender as the main category of analysis, paying particular attention to its interconnectedness with power. Carefully examining texts written by women in contemporary Spain, students explore the deliberate use of gender as a lens through which to understand different forms of domination—economic, political, and social. Prerequisite(s): one 200-level Spanish course above SPAN 211. Recommended background: SPAN 230. Only open to juniors and seniors. Not open to students who have received credit for SP/WS 344. Enrollment limited to 15. Instructor permission is required. F. López.
Concentrations

AV/GS 345. Trans Studies in the Politics of Visibility.

Many people have welcomed the increased visibility of trans and/or gender-nonconforming people as a sign of progress. Yet who is visible, what constitutes visibility, and whom do particular visibilities benefit? This course uses a trans studies framework to consider both the products and the politics of visibility. Topics include the representation of queer gender and trans and/or gender-nonconforming people in contemporary visual culture; critiques of visibility in relation to state surveillance and white supremacy; and the interconnected roles of norms regarding race, sexuality, ethnicity, class, and ability in perceptions and practices of gender normativity and transgression. Recommended background: at least one course with substantial work in gender, queer, or trans studies or the study of visual culture. Enrollment limited to 15. E. Rand.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

GS/PT 347. Gender and the State.

Two key questions provide the focus for this course: How does gender define citizenship, politics, and the state? How do states shape and use notions of manhood and womanhood to pursue their goals? Theoretical framings of gender and politics form the basis for reviewing processes through which gender constructions shape governace and policy as well as how state rulers manipulate gender norms in pursuit of development, war, or political control. Using case studies from various national contexts, the course investigates how women diversely identified (re)define their political roles, seek access to state power, and thus pursue visibility and authority within the state. Recommended background: one course in gender and sexuality studies or politics. Enrollment limited to 15. (Governance and Conflict.) (Identities and Interests.) L. Hill.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

INDC 352. Preserving the Vibration: Digitizing the Legacy of Vertamae Smart-Grosvenor.

This course introduces public and digital humanities through the life and work of noted journalist, food anthropologist, and public broadcaster Vertamae Grosvenor. Public humanities is concerned with expanding academic discourse beyond academia and facilitating conversations on topics of humanistic inquiry with the community at large. Digital studies provide a plethora of unconventional ways to engage community in public dialogues for the greater good. Drawing from books, operas, NPR audio segments, interviews, cookbooks, and other artifacts of Grosvenor, students create and curate a digital archive. Themes include Gullah culture, African American migration, foodways, memoir, public memory, and monuments. Leading theories and methods of black feminism, material culture, race, food studies, new media and digital humanities are foregrounded. Cross-listed in African American studies, American cultural studies, digital and computational studies, and gender and sexuality studies. Prerequisite(s): one of the following: AA/AC 119; AA/HI 243; AAS 100; ACS 100; AC/AV 340; AC/EN 395B; AV/GS 287; GSS 100; INDS 250 or 267; REL 255 or 270. Enrollment limited to 15. M. Beasley.
Interdisciplinary Programs

AC/GS 353. Critical Theory/Critical Acts.

Critical theory unravels streams of repressive discourses and hierarchies in our contemporary world, and artists have fostered ruptures and fissures in everyday life. This seminar ponders the concept of "cultural worker" and laments the domain of theory by exploring the intersections between critical theory, art, and cultural politics. Students engage in the ruptures, the fragments of knowledge, and making sense of the residue of "social change" while not forgetting the problematization of the aesthetic. They consider U.S.-based interdisciplinary artists such as Thiong'o, Fusco, Ana Mediata, Tania Bruguera, David Hammon, Jay-Z, Pope.L, and Lady Gaga with critical theorists such as Fanon, Butler, Foucault, Phalen, Muñoz, Moten, Adorno, Barthes, Olkowski, and Benjamin. This seminar is based on close readings of theoretical texts and connecting those texts with contemporary cultural politics. Prerequisite(s): AA/AC 119, ACS 100, AC/AV 340, AC/EN 395B, AV/GS 287, GSS 100, or INDS 250 or 267. Not open to students who have received credit for AC/WS 353. Enrollment limited to 15. M. Beasley.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

GSS 355. Gender and Technology.

This advanced reading seminar examines historical and contemporary relationships among masculinities, femininities, and technologies. Throughout, the seminar seeks to illuminate structured relations of inequality, investigating the ways in which everyday material objects come to generate, enforce, and transform patterns of social stratification. Prerequisite(s): GSS 100 and two other courses listed in gender and sexuality studies. Not open to students who have received credit for WGST 355. R. Herzig.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

GSS 356. Marriage in America.

This reading-intensive seminar delves into the surprising history of ideas and practices of marriage in the United States and U.S. territories from the colonial era to the present. Paying special attention to the idealization of intimate romantic love in contemporary popular culture, readings and discussions explore the interplay of citizenship, religion, consumption, labor, reproduction, sexuality, and racialized gender in an institution long at the center of American life. Prerequisite(s): GSS 100. Not open to students who have received credit for WGST 356. Enrollment limited to 19. R. Herzig.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

GSS 360. Independent Study.

Students, in consultation with a faculty advisor, individually design and plan a course of study or research not offered in the curriculum. Course work includes a reflective component, evaluation, and completion of an agreed-upon product. Sponsorship by a faculty member in the program/department, a course prospectus, and permission of the chair are required. Students may register for no more than one independent study per semester. Normally offered every year. Staff.
Interdisciplinary Programs

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

GSS 365. Special Topics.

A course or seminar offered from time to time and reserved for a special topic selected by the Committee on Gender and Sexuality Studies.
Interdisciplinary Programs

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

FR/GS 377. Colon/Colonisé: Récits de l'Expérience Nord-Africaine.

This course studies the colonial, postcolonial, and immigrant experience of North Africans as portrayed in Francophone literature. Readings include narratives and journals from the beginning of the colonial period in Algeria (1830), as well as the contemporary novels and discourse of feminists such as Assia Djebar, Malika Mokeddem, and Leïla Sebbar. Gender is often highlighted as a category of analysis. Prerequisite(s): FRE 240, 250, or 251. Not open to students who have received credit for FRE 377. Staff.
Concentrations

ED/GS 384. Education in a Globalized World.

We live in an era characterized by global flows of ideas and information, commodities, and people. In this course students examine the impacts of globalization and globalism upon educational policy and practices. Students explore how these transformative forces influence educative processes in different geographical, national, and cultural contexts. Topics address a set of concerns with enduring resonance to the field of educational studies, including social inequity and change; relations of power; and constructions of race, gender, and social class. A thirty-hour field experience is required. Not open to students who have received credit for ED/WS 280 or 384. Enrollment limited to 28. (Community-Engaged Learning.) [W2] P. Buck.
Concentrations

GS/SO 395I. Race, Class, Gender, and Family.

This seminar focuses on current debates in the research and policy literatures on social inequality and family. Potential topics include family policy, poverty, domestic violence, the division of labor in households, reproduction, partnerships, parenting, children's experiences within families, and the integration of work and family. All of these topics are addressed with attention to the role of intersecting social inequalities in structuring family experiences, including race, class, gender, sexuality, and nation. Prerequisite(s): SOC 204 and 205. Not open to students who have received credit for SO/WS 395I. Enrollment limited to 15. [W2] E. Kane.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

GS/SO 395K. Knowledge, Action, and Social Change.

This seminar explores the politics of knowledge and the potential role of research in advancing social justice and social change. Students consider competing perspectives on the public relevance of academic research, including debates within sociology and feminist studies. With those debates as context, students conduct publicly-engaged work through community-based research projects on issues related to social inequality. Prerequisite(s): INDS 250 and GSS 100, or SOC 204 and 205. Not open to students who have received credit for SO/WS 395K or SOC 395K. Enrollment limited to 15. (Community-Engaged Learning.) [W2] E. Kane.
Concentrations

EN/GS 395P. Worldly Women as Artists: Transnational Women Writers.

This course explores the question of what (or who) qualifies a woman to be regarded as an artist. Students also create an "artist portfolio" in the medium of their choice (visual arts, music, performance, photography, writing, etc.). In her novel, To the Lighthouse (1927), Virginia Woolf resisted the prevailing sentiment that "women can't paint, women can't write." How do twentieth- and twenty-first-century women writers represent female artists? How have transnational female painters and writers described their own creative journeys either visually or in writing? How are the female artists’ personae, themes, and challenges different from male perspectives on art? This seminar examines the fiction, paintings, poetry, and memoirs by Woolf, Dickinson, Kate Chopin, Christina Rossetti, Georgia O’Keeffe, Mary Cassatt, Frida Kahlo, Mary Oliver, Cathy Song, Gogi Saroj Pal, Siona Benjamin, Shani Mootoo, and others. Not open to students who have received credit for EN/WS 395P. Enrollment limited to 15. Instructor permission is required. (Critical thinking.) [W2] L. Dhingra.
Concentrations

EN/GS 395R. Sex Work on Stage and Screen.

This course examines stage and screen representations of sex work from two distinct cultural moments: early modern England and contemporary North America. Using concepts from Marxist, feminist, and queer theory, students investigate the cultural meanings of prostitution across time. Plays by Shakespeare, Middleton, Jonson, and Behn are paired with seventeenth-century polemics and fictional conversion narratives. The second phase of the course features films from 1990 onward, including Pretty Woman, The Girlfriend Experience, and Tangerine. Along with excerpts from novels and memoirs, supplemental readings from recent economic and sociological studies inform the study of these filmic representations of sex work. Recommended background: ENG 213 or 214. Enrollment limited to 15. Instructor permission is required. (Pre-1800.) [W2] One-time offering. M. Wright.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

EN/GS 395Z. Arab-American Feminisms.

This course develops students' ability to look at the intersection of gender, ethnicity, politics, and sexuality. Students read theoretical and literary material as a catalyst for discussions of fiction, focusing on the way Arab American feminists articulate their unique theoretical concerns. Students read such scholars as Mohja Kahf, Rabab Abdulhadi, Nadine Naber, and Randa Jarrar. Students consider the critical triumphs and limitations of creative and theoretical work in discussing these subjects. Recommended background: previous course work in American cultural studies or gender and sexuality studies. Not open to students who have received credit for EN/WS 395Z. Enrollment limited to 15. Instructor permission is required. (Race, Ethnicity, or Diasporic Literature.) [W2] T. Pickens.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

GSS 400. Junior-Senior Seminar.

This seminar is an advanced inquiry into feminist and queer theories and methods. Drawing on work in several disciplinary fields, students ask how using gender and sexuality as categories of analysis illuminates and/or alters work in other disciplines. Students also investigate the development of core theories and methods within gender and sexuality studies. Required of all majors and minors. Normally, one 400-level seminar is offered each year.
Interdisciplinary Programs

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

GSS 400C. Understanding Disease.

Intensive reading seminar examining the nature, causes, and consequences of human disease and illness. Students consider biomedicals model of disease; the professionalization of medical care; and the role of class, nation, gender, sexuality, and race in disease research and treatment. Prerequisite(s): five core courses in gender and sexuality studies. Not open to students who have received credit for WGST 400C. Enrollment limited to 15. Instructor permission is required. R. Herzig.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

GSS 400D. Global Feminisms.

A seminar exploring feminist movements in an international context. Topics include divisions of labor and the "global assembly line," immigration and transnationalism, postcolonialism, and cultural imperialism. Students analyze local and international feminist activism and examine multiple definitions of gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, and nationhood. Prerequisite(s): five core courses in gender and sexuality studies. Not open to students who have received credit for WGST 400D. Enrollment limited to 15. Instructor permission is required. R. Herzig, L. Hill, M. Plastas.
Interdisciplinary Programs

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

GSS 457. Senior Thesis.

The research and writing of an extended essay or report, or the completion of a creative project, under the supervision of a faculty member. Majors normally register for GSS 458 in the winter semester. Majors writing an honors thesis register for both GSS 457 and 458. [W3] Normally offered every year. Staff.
Interdisciplinary Programs

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

GSS 458. Senior Thesis.

The research and writing of an extended essay or report, or the completion of a creative project, under the supervision of a faculty member. Majors normally register for GSS 458 in the winter semester. Majors writing an honors thesis register for both GSS 457 and 458. [W3] Normally offered every year. Staff.
Interdisciplinary Programs

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

Short Term Courses

GS/PT s12. Gender, War, and Peace.

This course uses gender as an analytical tool to examine the history of war and peace. How do war and militarization construct masculinities and femininities? What types of roles have women played in the making of war and in the making of peace? How has gender socialization influenced people's analysis of and participation in war and in peace activism? What are the gender politics of the politics of war and of peacemaking? How is gender deployed in current war zones and in current movements for peace? Recommended background: GSS 100. Not open to students who have received credit for GS/PT 220, or PT/WS 220 or s12. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 29. (Governance and Conflict.) (Political Economy.) M. Plastas.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

GS/PT s14. Gender and Tobacco.

This course explores the sociohistorical complexities of tobacco and the political economies of tobacco production, consumption, and regulation. The course focuses on how gender, race, and class influence tobacco industry policies, tobacco control procedures, the health and economic impact of tobacco on communities, and the strategies of grassroots and transnational activists in tobacco regulation movements. Recommended background: course work in gender and sexuality studies. Not open to students who have received credit for GSS 335, PT/WS s14, or WGST 335. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 29. M. Plastas.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

INDC s18. Wilde Times: Scandal, Celebrity, and the Law.

Oscar Wilde, an icon today, was popular in his own time as well. His relationship with Alfred Douglas was an open secret despite the fact that homosexuality was at the time a criminal offence. Indeed, Wilde’s sexuality was tolerated until he sued Douglas’ irascible father for libel. This course begins with the 1895 trials, seeking to understand cultures of sexuality in a period notorious for sexual repression, and contextualizing issues they raise of scandal and the law, celebrity, gender, and sexuality. Designed to encourage independent research, the course guides students through the research process, drawing to the fore histories often hidden from view. Cross-listed in European studies, gender and sexuality studies, and history. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 29. (European.) (Modern. ) C. Shaw.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

INDC s19. Food, Culture, and Performance.

This interdisciplinary seminar examines the idea of cultural engagement through food. Students explore the meanings of food and eating across cultures, with particular attention to how people define themselves socially, symbolically, and politically through food consumption practices. Students in this community-based course collaborate with Nezinscot Farm exploring themes of gathering, homesteading, and biodynamic farming. The course develops research and writing skills, introduces visual and performance theories of culture, and fosters an understanding of the importance of food and its relationship to identity construction, histories, and cultural literacy. The course culminates in a performative meal. Cross-listed in African American studies, American cultural studies, anthropology, and gender and sexuality studies. Enrollment limited to 19. (Community-Engaged Learning.) M. Beasley.
ConcentrationsInterdisciplinary Programs

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)

GS/PT s27. Feminisms of the 1970s and 1980s.

This course explores the rise of multiple feminist theories and forms of activism during the 1970s and 1980s. Students critically examine the genealogy of the conceptualization of "second-wave feminism," and explore the role of gay, Chicano, and black liberation, civil rights, and labor struggles on the development of feminist thinking and action. The course pays particular attention to how feminists of this period addressed questions of U.S. foreign policy in Vietnam, Central America, and South Africa; the nuclear arms race; and U.S. domestic race relations. Students read from primary source material and study the literature produced by Marxist feminisms, black feminisms, lesbian feminisms, liberal feminisms, and radical feminisms. Recommended background: GSS 100. Not open to students who have received credit for PT/WS s27. Open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 25. (Identities and Interests.) (Institutional Politics.) M. Plastas.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

GS/PT s32. Global Flows: Work, Sex, and Care.

Globalization refers to processes underlying profound changes in contemporary life from the corporate boardroom to the family bedroom. What do women, sex and sexuality have to do with the global political economy? How does gender—the social organization of sexual difference—shape the future "world without borders"? In what ways might global restructuring depend on women and gender relations? This course examines how gendered divisions of labor, power, and decision making shape flows of money, jobs, goods, technology, and people across borders. Students examine interdisplinary perspectives from political economy, gender and sexuality studies, and film studies to consider gender as a critical dimension of global processes of change and transformation in international flows, connections, production, and consumption. Not open to students who have received credit for PT/WS s32. Enrollment limited to 19. (Identities and Interests.) L. Hill.
Concentrations

This course is referenced by the following General Education Concentrations

INDC s33. Brazil in Watercolor: Sexuality Politics in the Tropics.

What are the historical and social bases for an intersectional identity politics of race, gender, and specifically, sexuality? How have sexuality movements emerged to champion the struggles of marginalized lesbians, gays, bisexuals, and trans identities? How has the state responded to LGBT advocacy? What are the implications for an inclusive democratic citizenship? This course takes students to three urban centers of LGBT activism in Brazil: Salvador da Bahia, Rio de Janeiro, and São Paulo. In each, they participate in experiential and embodied learning with LGBT activists, nongovernmental organizations, participatory councils, and policy machinery for these communities. Recommended background: coursework in gender and sexuality studies, Latin American studies, or politics. Cross-listed in gender and sexuality studies, Latin American studies, and politics. New course beginning Short Term 2018. Enrollment limited to 12. Instructor permission is required. One-time offering. J. Longaker.

GSS s50. Independent Study.

Students, in consultation with a faculty advisor, individually design and plan a course of study or research not offered in the curriculum. Course work includes a reflective component, evaluation, and completion of an agreed-upon product. Sponsorship by a faculty member in the program/department, a course prospectus, and permission of the chair are required. Students may register for no more than one independent study during a Short Term. Normally offered every year. Staff.
Interdisciplinary Programs

This course counts toward the following Interdisciplinary Program(s)